Automotive

2022 Mitsubishi Outlander

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 5th, 2022 1:00 am
[OP]
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Nov 10, 2018
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2022 Mitsubishi Outlander

Been researching cars for the younger members of my extended family (retired life is slow) who are about to 'own' a car for a while (8 years +) as they build up their nest egg.

I'm surprised the 2022 Outlander with its 10 year bumper to bumper warranty, build quality, etc isn't higher on people's list.

Generally speaking Japanese cars are reliable but are rust buckets, and German cars are not as reliable but resist corrosion a lot better. The reason is that most German cars go through a zinc 'dunk' prior to painting. I was shocked to see Mitsubishi does this as well on their 2022 Outlander.



The only downside I can think of is that there's no spare tire. Any thoughts on the Outlander for those that have driven one?
For legal topics and discussions, the opinion, guidance, and thoughts provided are my own and are not considered to be legal advice, in any manner.
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Deal Guru
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Sep 3, 2003
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You can't just generalize that Japanese-built vehicles are all rustbuckets and do not undergo extensive rustproofing from the factory.

It's a Nissan Rogue underneath, with a Mitsubishi skin and equipment (like a [barely-usable] third-row of seats), if you don't already know.

That's not a bad thing. The current-gen Rogue has been reviewed very well.
Deal with it.
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Apr 22, 2013
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angryaudifanatic wrote: I'm surprised the 2022 Outlander with its 10 year bumper to bumper warranty, build quality, etc isn't higher on people's list.
Main reason is most people associate Mitsubishi with extremely low end Japanese car. A lot of their previous cars from 2007-2021 provide an extremely poor impression from very low grade interior quality to just something taken for granted for most as door solidity. They once had a 10-10-10 year warranty, I don't know too many who partake in that. Excitement for their vehicles plummeted with the loss of the Evo X. They were tolerable used buys for the long warranty, but to buy a lot of them new...you were effectively buying a very out of date car.
angryaudifanatic wrote: The only downside I can think of is that there's no spare tire. Any thoughts on the Outlander for those that have driven one?
The new one is said to be a major step up from Mitsubishi's efforts for the past 15 years, however I don't think too many people have tried one. It will require them to be circulated into the rental supply chain before most people get to even drive one. The new Outlander is Nissan based, if there's a concerning item its going to be the JATCO CVT which even Nissan is no longer going with.
[OP]
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KorruptioN wrote: You can't just generalize that Japanese-built vehicles are all rustbuckets and do not undergo extensive rustproofing from the factory.

It's a Nissan Rogue underneath, with a Mitsubishi skin and equipment (like a [barely-usable] third-row of seats), if you don't already know.

That's not a bad thing. The current-gen Rogue has been reviewed very well.
Can you please let me know what other Japanese automakers dunk their cars in zinc? This is the gold standard in corrosion resistance.

I know of none and I'd like to know if others do. I know Nissan, Toyota and Lexus do not.
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angryaudifanatic wrote: Can you please let me know what other Japanese automakers dunk their cars in zinc? This is the gold standard in corrosion resistance.

I know of none and I'd like to know if others do. I know Nissan, Toyota and Lexus do not.
At least I can speak for Subaru, where they use galvanized steel in the production of their vehicles. In addition, there's body sealants, and various "anti-chipping" coats in strategic points of the vehicle to help combat against corrosion. Furthermore, more and more vehicles are making use of aluminum, for both structural components and body panels, so they don't turn into iron oxide, naturally.

Surface rust is inevitable, and for the most part only unsightly. Japanese cars haven't been rustbuckets for quite some time now - the first-gen Mazda3 was an obvious exception, but there haven't been any glaring examples in recent memory that I can think of.
Deal with it.
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Dec 16, 2014
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mitsubishi is bottom of the barrel in every category
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May 30, 2012
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karakoram wrote: mitsubishi is bottom of the barrel in every category
What category?
[OP]
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KorruptioN wrote: At least I can speak for Subaru, where they use galvanized steel in the production of their vehicles. In addition, there's body sealants, and various "anti-chipping" coats in strategic points of the vehicle to help combat against corrosion. Furthermore, more and more vehicles are making use of aluminum, for both structural components and body panels, so they don't turn into iron oxide, naturally.

Surface rust is inevitable, and for the most part only unsightly. Japanese cars haven't been rustbuckets for quite some time now - the first-gen Mazda3 was an obvious exception, but there haven't been any glaring examples in recent memory that I can think of.
Subaru is quite literally the bottom of the barrel with corrosion resistance. Their paint as well is worse in class. A lot of the underneath components of Japanese cars are steel and yes a lot of rust. This doesn't generally happen a the Germans due to use of aluminum. Don't even get me started wrt grade of stainless steel used for exhaust components b/w the Germans and the Japanese. So many people lack the knowledge to accurately compare metallurgy between brand A/B and I don't fault them for that.

As a side note, I am surprised to see Hyundai (and I guess on the same note, Genesis) do zinc coatings. I wasn't aware of that. I'm actually very annoyed that Honda/Acura/Lexus/Toyota don't bother with this. Super reliable, super corrosion resistant cars is absolutely something these 4 Japanese automakers can do, but for reasons unknown to me, don't.

That said, I guess we should probably back on topic.

(I should recant a statement I made. I know the Lexus RX built in Canada is dunked in zinc, but I have not seen any other Lexus go through the same wrt Youtube factory videos)
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Jr. Member
Jul 4, 2017
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I owned a Mitsubishi Lancer for a few years and then passed it on to my father who's been driving it since. It's been 6 or 7 years now, 0 issues so far.

I was going to get the outlander, but got a really good deal with Subaru, so went with that instead. It's honestly a great car, I don't know why there aren't more around.

/edit: My best dealership experience ever was at Mitsubishi as well. I drove a whole bunch of cars and went through many dealerships including high end ones. Mitsubishi was by far the best experience.
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2004
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Mitsubishis definitely offer a lot of value right now. Agree with OP that they should probably be higher on people's lists, of the people that are just looking for general use CUVs that don't care about things like high performance or lux branding.
angryaudifanatic wrote: Subaru is quite literally the bottom of the barrel with corrosion resistance. Their paint as well is worse in class.
LOL Subaru. Built like a tin can and that's a guarantee! :lol: Seriously their paint is lulz. It'll chip if you sneeze on it too hard. It's no wonder all the kids that own them need to get those dorky-lookin overpriced, oversized, square mudflaps on 'em :lol: 'Cause you know even if the car is never off-roaded any little grains of sand/dirt that hit the paint in regular driving and it's gonna look sandblasted in no time. Good ol' Subaru!
Deal Guru
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KorruptioN wrote: At least I can speak for Subaru, where they use galvanized steel in the production of their vehicles. In addition, there's body sealants, and various "anti-chipping" coats in strategic points of the vehicle to help combat against corrosion. Furthermore, more and more vehicles are making use of aluminum, for both structural components and body panels, so they don't turn into iron oxide, naturally.

Surface rust is inevitable, and for the most part only unsightly. Japanese cars haven't been rustbuckets for quite some time now - the first-gen Mazda3 was an obvious exception, but there haven't been any glaring examples in recent memory that I can think of.
Subaru Impreza 2009ish hatch and trunk were all rust buckets. That model had to be fixed as part of a recall.
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Dec 30, 2019
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spike1128 wrote: Subaru Impreza 2009ish hatch and trunk were all rust buckets. That model had to be fixed as part of a recall.
All of them? My '08 Impreza Sport has no rust aside from the exhaust, which is expected. The paint is in great shape too.

I have a '10 Nissan Frontier as well. No rust and it's been exceedingly reliable. Yet, ask online and everyone will say "Nissan's are trash!" or "Chrysler of Japan" etc.
[OP]
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Macfuzza wrote: All of them? My '08 Impreza Sport has no rust aside from the exhaust, which is expected. The paint is in great shape too.

I have a '10 Nissan Frontier as well. No rust and it's been exceedingly reliable. Yet, ask online and everyone will say "Nissan's are trash!" or "Chrysler of Japan" etc.
Everyone takes care of their cars differently. In civil court, the litmus test is "on a balance of probabilities", which means (well, actually, it doesn't mean this, but it's analogous to), "more often than not", Japanese cars rust more often than German cars. Why:

1) German cars tend to be better built in places where the customer doesn't see: e.g. underbodies (though mechanical reliability is often a gong show)
2) German cars tend to be zinc dipped
3) German cars tend to use aluminum more than Japanese cars
4) German cars tend to use a better grade of stainless steel

One really only has to look at corrosion warranties between brands. Japanese automakers tend to have significantly worse warranty than German ones (compare Lexus to Mercedes, Audi, etc).

Anyways, let's not let confirmation bias or the law of small number...bias anyone here.

We're all in the same boat.

We(?) all want a super quiet (?), ultra reliable, rust free, feature filled car for as cheaply as possible.

Back to the Outlander?
For legal topics and discussions, the opinion, guidance, and thoughts provided are my own and are not considered to be legal advice, in any manner.
Jr. Member
Dec 30, 2019
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angryaudifanatic wrote: Everyone takes care of their cars differently. In civil court, the litmus test is "on a balance of probabilities", which means (well, actually, it doesn't mean this, but it's analogous to), "more often than not", Japanese cars rust more often than German cars. Why:

1) German cars tend to be better built in places where the customer doesn't see: e.g. underbodies (though mechanical reliability is often a gong show)
2) German cars tend to be zinc dipped
3) German cars tend to use aluminum more than Japanese cars
4) German cars tend to use a better grade of stainless steel

One really only has to look at corrosion warranties between brands. Japanese automakers tend to have significantly worse warranty than German ones (compare Lexus to Mercedes, Audi, etc).

Anyways, let's not let confirmation bias or the law of small number...bias anyone here.

We're all in the same boat.

We(?) all want a super quiet (?), ultra reliable, rust free, feature filled car for as cheaply as possible.

Back to the Outlander?
In short. If you want a long lasting vehicle, buy a Japanese brand and take care of it.

I want a reliable vehicle with a couple specific features and a reasonable price. Your description is likely closer to the average buyer.

The Outlander has been a great value for years. I'm not incredibly excited for the latest Rogue based platform but it appears to be a good vehicle.
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Macfuzza wrote: In short. If you want a long lasting vehicle, buy a Japanese brand and take care of it.

I want a reliable vehicle with a couple specific features and a reasonable price. Your description is likely closer to the average buyer.

The Outlander has been a great value for years. I'm not incredibly excited for the latest Rogue based platform but it appears to be a good vehicle.
Generally I wouldnt mind having a Outlander. If Mitsubishi still use their own AWd system it would be great. Using Nissan awd would be a step back unless they are using the system from the GTR or Infiniti type systems. Ghosen’s Nissan was complete garbage, so that’s why Nissan still has such a bad reputation. CVT from Nissan is pure trash.
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German cars tend to be better built yet less reliable. Kind of a juxtaposition there.

Anyways how you maintain your car goes a long way to prevent rust on any manufacturer. Regularly spray down the underbody, thoroughly flush the wheel wells cause that is where all the crap builds up and regularly seal and wax your paint.

I owned a 1990 Acura Integra for over 20 years got almost 300K glorious KM on her and no rust. Dad owned a 1992 Camry for 20 years over 200K KM on that and no rust. I owned a 2006 Mazda 5 (yes Mazda) for almost 10 years over 100K KM on that and no rust. My dad currently owns a 2009 Infiniti G37 low mileage cause he's retired now and no rust . I currently own a 2013 Honda Civic Si almost 100K KM and guess what no rust. Wife drives a 2015 Nissan Juke over 70K KM no rust. Not sure what else to say.
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Oct 15, 2005
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angryaudifanatic wrote: Can you please let me know what other Japanese automakers dunk their cars in zinc? This is the gold standard in corrosion resistance.

I know of none and I'd like to know if others do. I know Nissan, Toyota and Lexus do not.
Electroplating is pretty widely used in auto manufacturing these days.



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Where do your family members live that rust is a concern? Aside from surface chips which you may not be able to avoid a weekly car wash (with underwash crucially) during the winter months is all you really need. Seldom will you see perforation but surface rust could happen if something strikes the panel. When I purchased a CX-5 for my wife I was told Mazda rust like crazy…coming up on 8 years with the vehicle parked outside year round and a car wash routinely after each snowfall and subsequent salt dump on the road and not a spot of rust on or underneath the vehicle…the winter steel rims well that’s another matter.
[OP]
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100Pacer wrote: Where do your family members live that rust is a concern? Aside from surface chips which you may not be able to avoid a weekly car wash (with underwash crucially) during the winter months is all you really need. Seldom will you see perforation but surface rust could happen if something strikes the panel. When I purchased a CX-5 for my wife I was told Mazda rust like crazy…coming up on 8 years with the vehicle parked outside year round and a car wash routinely after each snowfall and subsequent salt dump on the road and not a spot of rust on or underneath the vehicle…the winter steel rims well that’s another matter.
In the country where it was -23? or so last night and automatic car washes aren't a thing. There's a lot that folks in the GTA take for granted. Surface rust is not a big deal, but when rust corrodes out subframes leading to recalls, etc. Google Ford F150 rust, or Toyota Tundra rust, and you'll see that non German cars have a lot of undercarriage rust.

Now, go take a 15 year old Audi A4 that hasn't been in a collision, and it's spotless underneath. Nope, no surface rust. Audi does test every model through what they call the INKA test, which is a test specific to rust prevention. Audi/Porsche (and BMW/Mercedes (post Chrysler)) have mastered rust resistance, but they couldn't make a reliable engine capable of very high mileage if they had a billion $ in R&D.

Anyway, I'm glad to see that automakers are starting to apply zinc protection to cars. About 2 years ago I reached out to Toyota and Lexus Canada and both said they don't do it. Glad to see there are more options now. For brevity, additional research by yours truly yielded a bit more datapoints on this one. Hyundai does it as well, but there are no videos on Genesis factories on Youtube, though I'd be surprised if they did not do it as Hyundai does. Goes to show Korean cars should be well built in that regard.

I just wish automakers were generally more confident that their cars survive against rust. A 5 year rust warranty is nothing more than a funny joke. Most cars start to rust at the >5 year and onwards mark.

Anyway, back to the Outlander! Will suggest the young one to take it for a test drive.
For legal topics and discussions, the opinion, guidance, and thoughts provided are my own and are not considered to be legal advice, in any manner.
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Jun 23, 2016
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angryaudifanatic wrote: Been researching cars for the younger members of my extended family (retired life is slow) who are about to 'own' a car for a while (8 years +) as they build up their nest egg.

I'm surprised the 2022 Outlander with its 10 year bumper to bumper warranty, build quality, etc isn't higher on people's list.

Generally speaking Japanese cars are reliable but are rust buckets, and German cars are not as reliable but resist corrosion a lot better. The reason is that most German cars go through a zinc 'dunk' prior to painting. I was shocked to see Mitsubishi does this as well on their 2022 Outlander.



The only downside I can think of is that there's no spare tire. Any thoughts on the Outlander for those that have driven one?
I didn't know they had re-designed the gas model for 2022 until I kept seeing the ads popping up on my FB. Saw the GT-Premium trim was 42Kish all in so that was attractive. This would have been a secondary car replacing a 14' Escape so figured we'd take a look. This was late November. Interior was very nice on this trim. 3rd row was a little tight and to be used in a real pinch. My main issues with the car was honestly the power/torque. I just found it too low and the get up took me having to plant my foot down. If it had even mid 200s that would have been a difference. Good car otherwise as far as comfort, tech, safety features and cabin quietness.
Definitely will take a look again when they do the PHEV in this body style. That is supposed to have substantially more power along with getting somewhere around 80km on a charge.

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