Home & Garden

4' led Tube, Ballast Delete Question.

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 11th, 2020 8:48 am
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 20, 2011
1063 posts
363 upvotes
Mississauga

4' led Tube, Ballast Delete Question.

I want to replace the standard 4" fluorescent tubes with the led equivalent. I know there are different versions and the one I want is "ballast delete", therefore I'd like to know:

Questions:
I see mention of dual end vs single end connections. what is the difference long term?
Single end seems to be the simplest way to connect, yet they're much cheaper to purchase, why?
7 replies
Deal Addict
Sep 8, 2017
3725 posts
3836 upvotes
GTA
I just changed a fluorescent tube fixture to LEDs. I used Phillips UniversalFit LED tubes from Home Depot that don't require deleting the ballast and rewiring the fixture. You just need to check if your ballast is on their compatible list.

I also considered Toggled brand tubes that require the re-wiring you're asking about. But it was too confusing, the Phillips bulbs would work, and they were cheaper. So the Phillips bulbs were the obvious choice for me.

https://www.homedepot.ca/product/philip ... ?rrec=true
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
15426 posts
4597 upvotes
London
MyDream1 wrote: I want to replace the standard 4" fluorescent tubes with the led equivalent. I know there are different versions and the one I want is "ballast delete", therefore I'd like to know:

Questions:
I see mention of dual end vs single end connections. what is the difference long term?
Single end seems to be the simplest way to connect, yet they're much cheaper to purchase, why?
https://www.hyperikon.com/blog/dual-end ... ifference/

tl:dr
Dual end = line on one end of tube, neutral on the other end of tube
single end = one pin = line, other pin = neutral (on the same end of the tube)

Dual ended = for fixtures with multiple tubes (in the same fixture)
Single ended = for fixtures that only use one tube (in the same fixture)

You could use single ended tubes in a fixture that has multiple tubes, but you have to do (a lot) more wiring vs double ended tubes

Edit - ****Note **** if you convert a fixture, you must mark the fixture to ensure any person doing a replacement uses the correct tube.

I used these from a 2016 RFD black friday deal 10 tubes for $70
lightingbox-10-pack-t8-led-light-tube-4 ... 9-2059113/

I don't think dual ended were legal to import into Canada for a long time because one end of the tube could exposed/ live during installation= electrocution hazard
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4050 posts
1305 upvotes
WFH
l69norm wrote: I don't think dual ended were legal to import into Canada for a long time because one end of the tube could exposed/ live during installation= electrocution hazard
The live bits of an Edison screw connector are also exposed and easily accessible during bulb installation = electrocution hazard. Sounds like the paper pushers are being quite selective and inconsistent over what they want to protect us from. No amount of rules can protect us from a lack of common sense.

Is there a standard marking that should be applied to a conversion? Does it need to be in all official languages?
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
15426 posts
4597 upvotes
London
dirtmover wrote: The live bits of an Edison screw connector are also exposed and easily accessible during bulb installation = electrocution hazard. Sounds like the paper pushers are being quite selective and inconsistent over what they want to protect us from. No amount of rules can protect us from a lack of common sense.

Is there a standard marking that should be applied to a conversion? Does it need to be in all official languages?

https://www.premierltg.com/history-of-the-led-tube/


Single-End Wired Type B LED Tubes
Type B LED tubes, also known as ballast bypass or direct wire LED tubes, were released into the market initially as a double-end wired option, but then transitioned to a single end solution due to UL issues. The single-end wired Type B LED tubes quickly surpassed the popularity of Type A LED tubes. A little more work was involved in this retrofit process. The ballast was bypassed, and if the current fluorescent fixture had shunted sockets (most common in T8 fluorescent fixtures) it needed to be re-wired to one end with a new non-shunted socket. With the Type B tubes, the end user is also given a sticker to put on the fixture signifying that the fixture was modified and going forward would need a single-end wired LED T8.

The “Big 3” lighting manufacturers stayed away from this option initially due to safety concerns, such as shock during install if the power is not cut from the fixture during the re-wire process. They were also worried that upon retrofitting a fixture to Type B, an installer years later on might not read the sticker and throw in a fluorescent or ballast compatible LED T8. This would result in the lamps burning out instantly and possibly “exploding”. The risks notwithstanding, small to medium sized lighting manufacturers got behind this option and users loved it. The “Big 3” lighting manufacturers lost a lot of business over the years because of their initial decision and now they all have a Type B option. The Type B solution is the leading method for retrofitting tubes to LED by a wide margin primarily because once you have the fixture converted, all you need for that fixture to work are good LED Type B tubes (no ballast or external driver).

Double-End Wired Type B LED Tubes
As mentioned earlier, many Type B tubes started as double end wired, but due to UL issues they were transitioned to single end. Double-End Type B LED tubes can now be produced without the UL issues, so they are taking off in popularity. The idea is that these will jump into the robust Type B LED T8 market and deliver a solution that results in less up-front work as you can re-use the existing sockets and don’t have to rewire the fixture. However, old fluorescent sockets often need to be replaced anyways making the single end option as feasible as the double end.



........................................................................



Labels are as per the provincial requirements for electrical inspection

Example - Ontario ESA

https://esasafe.com/assets/files/esasaf ... il2020.pdf


“This luminaire has been modified to operate
LED lamps. Do not attempt to install or
operate ___*___ lamps in this luminaire.”

REPLACE ONLY WITH
[Manufacturer][Catalogue Number]
___*___

This luminaire has been modified and no longer operates fluorescent lamps.
Use only XXXXXX LED Tube lamps for lamp replacement
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 20, 2011
1063 posts
363 upvotes
Mississauga
Thanks everyone for their replies.

derass
The reason I want the conversion is because the ballast is gone and although I have spares, I want to eliminate them entirely.

l69norm
The led tubes I'm considering purchasing are Hyperkon, therefore I already read the link you provided and still came up with the questions I'm asking. I did read it again and it seems there really is no advantage one over the other other than single end seems 35% cheaper.

If I'm reading correctly the existing sockets can be used in single and double end led bulbs?

Edit:
I found out one of the main difference, for the single end, the tombstone needs to be non shunted. The dual end, the tombstones need to be shunted.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
15426 posts
4597 upvotes
London
MyDream1 wrote: Thanks everyone for their replies.

.

l69norm
....If I'm reading correctly the existing sockets can be used in single and double end led bulbs?
I believe some T8 tombstones/ sockets have internal shunts (ie the left and right electrical contacts inside the socket are permanently tied together) . If you are using single end led tubes, you may have to replace the shunted tombstone/ socket.

With double ended led tubes, shunted T8 tombstones are not an issue

In my case, the T8 tombstone shunt connection was an external wire which I could cut. In some cases, you can take the shunted tombstone apart to cutout the internal shunt.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Jun 12, 2007
15426 posts
4597 upvotes
London
MyDream1 wrote: ...
The led tubes I'm considering purchasing are Hyperkon, therefore I already read the link you provided and still came up with the questions I'm asking. I did read it again and it seems there really is no advantage one over the other other than single end seems 35% cheaper.

If I'm reading correctly the existing sockets can be used in single and double end led bulbs?

Edit:
I found out one of the main difference, for the single end, the tombstone needs to be non shunted. The dual end, the tombstones need to be shunted.
Double ended tubes need less wiring changes for a fixture with multiple tubes. It allows you to simply daisy chain the wiring across the ends of the all new LED tubes in the same fixture. For example, in a fixture with 4 tubes, the hot wire just daisy chains across one end of all the new tubes while neutral wire daisy chains across the other ends. There's no worry about shunted tombstones, they don't need to be modified/ changed.

Each single ended tube in the same fixture needs have the wiring duplicated. For 4 tube fixture, duplicate the wiring changes 4X and modify / change out shunted tombstones 4X

The time/ labor savings for double ended tubes might not matter much in a simple DIY residential situation where you are modifying only a few fixtures.

In a big commercial building situation, double ended tubes may give a 15-30 min time saving per fixture X thousands of fixtures is a huge labor/ cost savings

Top