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  • Jun 27th, 2018 11:03 am
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Deal Expert
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Aug 18, 2005
21125 posts
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Burlington-Hamilton
They don't build them like they used to.
Most appliances now adays are built to be disposable.

My parents' old Maytag washer lasted 30 years with no repairs, but they let it go when they sold the house. Years later, my dad still regrets not keeping the washer because they didn't know what they had, or that modern appliances will only last a few years before developing problems.
Last edited by Jucius Maximus on Jun 25th, 2018 11:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
- casual gastronomist -
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Sep 29, 2005
6477 posts
1604 upvotes
Montreal
Stoves in particular have been problematic for me. I have had 6 different repairs on 2 stoves in 14 years. I say 2 stoves because it was too expensive to repair the first one after the extended warrantee expired. My first stove was a Frigidaire - repaired 4X and then scrapped after it died and the warrantee was no more. My current stove - repaired 2X so far is a Whirlpool. I thought I would need a 3rd repair but unplugging it and replugging it in seems to have fixed it for now. It has 4 months of extended warrantee left but it's from Sears so I'm SOL.

Meanwhile, my GE washing machine's transmission is being repaired tomorrow.

I've fixed my Kitchenaid dishwasher myself 2X as the string used to support the door snaps after a year or so.
My Amana refrigerator has been trouble-free for 15 years now.

My Inglis clothes dryer has also been trouble-free for 10 years although the door gasket falls off.

My conclusion is that today's appliances look great but the quality is sadly wanting.
Last edited by Phils on Jun 26th, 2018 6:50 am, edited 1 time in total.
Phils
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
23583 posts
22541 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
Phils wrote: Stoves in particular have been problematic for me. I have had 6 different repairs on 2 stoves in 14 years. I say 2 stoves because it was too expensive to repair the first one after the extended warrantee expired. My first stove was a Frigidaire - repaired 4X and then scrapped after it died and the warrantee was no more. My current stove - repaired 2X so far is a Whirlpool. I thought I would need a 3rd repair but unplugging it and replugging it in seems to have fixed it for now. It has 4 months of extended warrantee left but it's from Sears so I'm SOL.

Meanwhile, my GE washing machine's transmission is being repaired tomorrow.

I've fixed my Kitchenaid dishwasher myself 2X as the string used to support the door snaps after a year or so.
My Amana refrigerator has been trouble-free for 125 years now.

My Inglis clothes dryer has also been trouble-free for 10 years although the door gasket falls off.

My conclusion is that today's appliances look great but the quality is sadly wanting.
Sounds like a string of bad luck...
Or, as my Dad used to say in jest
Don’t bad mouth your car, appliances, or tech outloud
Cause they’ll be listening and gang up on you
Smiling Face With Sunglasses
Deal Expert
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Jun 12, 2007
18948 posts
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London
Many appliance manufacturers like Whirlpool, GE/Haier , Electrolux/Frigidaire, Samsung, LG sell under multiple brand names

For example in washers , same physical machine under various brand names:
Maytag Bravos = Whirlpool Cabrio = Kenmore Oasis

Some other Kenmore washers may be made by Samsung or LG

The reliability of a particular model depends on who physically manufactured that appliance, not necessarily the brand name that appears on it
Deal Fanatic
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Oct 22, 2007
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London
This is great anecdotally, but not super useful. There's so much survivor bias when people talk about old products. Every company has the potential to make great units, and the potential to make duds; some designs don't show their inherent flaws until they are couple of years old. If it moves, shakes and/or uses water, certain things just wear out, like belts, rollers, mechanical switches, actuators and solenoids. Products are made to comply with newer regulations, and have tighter tolerances. Consumers are very price sensitive; how much of the market is willing to pay a premium for an appliance with double the lifespan? People like fancy features, but every added layer of complexity adds another pile of failure points.
Even things as mundane as your water and electrical quality have an impact on appliance life.
Moderator
May 28, 2012
12047 posts
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Saskatoon
I wouldn't say older appliances required zero repairs in its lifetime....it's just that appliances from 20+ years ago were mostly mechanical and could be fixed by anyone remotely handy..plus parts were readily available and mostly inexpensive. My washer, dryer and stove were all over 20 years old before I replaced them. The fridge is 25 years old and still running.
Deal Expert
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Jun 12, 2007
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London
Ottomaddox wrote: ..Consumers are very price sensitive; how much of the market is willing to pay a premium for an appliance with double the lifespan?
.
If you think about it, an old school standard washing machine cost like $600 brand new 25 years ago.

Isn't that like $1500-$1800 in today's money?

Consumers today don't want to pay that kind of money.

They want the same equivalent basic washer for the same $600 or less. The manufacturers had to cut corners somewhere
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2002
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rb wrote: Lots more features today so lots more can go wrong....
Lots of truth in that. You see people at the appliance stores going oooh and aaaah at all the features. The more features there are the more that's going to break, especially with the move from mechanical control panels to electronic ones.
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Oct 22, 2007
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London
TomLafinsky wrote: When I was very young I heard someone say that rich people don't buy cheap stuff because they can't afford it. It has always stayed with me, though I'm not sure why? Maybe because I would like to be rich??? I'm not rich, but when I buy something I do all my research even if it takes me 6 months and what I buy is among the highest quality you can find. I take good care of what I own and things rarely break down. I'm doing the same thing with cars, that's why I now only buy Lexus. Not only it saves me money, but it also saves me time as I don't have to waste time at the dealer.
I love toyotas as well.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2004
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East Gwillimbury
Newer appliances are computerized, offers more features and more energy efficient. Electronics will break down, they are not necessarily built poorly. Older appliances may last longer because they have less electronics, but they are not a energy efficient and may not clean as well as their modern equivalent
Deal Fanatic
Sep 29, 2005
6477 posts
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Montreal
Electronics in stoves are problematic as electronics and heat don't play well together. A stove's motherboard usually costs around $500 to replace.

OP, all my appliances are top of the line. It made no difference in quality. They're all problematic. One piece of advice: It may not pay for many items but when it comes to appliances take the extended warrantee.
Phils
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Oct 22, 2007
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London
Phils wrote: Electronics in stoves are problematic as electronics and heat don't play well together. A stove's motherboard usually costs around $500 to replace.
If I ever meet the guy that decided electronics and a steam mode were appropriate for a dryer, I will kick him in the nuts.

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