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Accounting or Computer Science degree? Which is more better in Canada?

[OP]
Newbie
Oct 13, 2021
3 posts
3 upvotes

Accounting or Computer Science degree? Which is more better in Canada?

Which out of these 2 is the more employable degree? The one more likely to land you a good-paying job, with good demand and job opportunities in the job market? I enjoy both and feel can be good at good. I am also open to working in different countries if required/needed.

(1) Computer science degree? (Going on to work as a software developer?)

(2) accounting degree? (Going on getting your CPA and working as an accountant?)

Thank You.
44 replies
Deal Fanatic
Dec 20, 2018
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well... accountants aren't getting 90k starting and six figure signing bonuses even if they're like the cream of the crop unlike compsci gradds

but in 5-10 years...who knows though my bet is on tech...accounting is a grind until you get your designation and even then it's way more saturated and imo growth not as bright as tech
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 13, 2021
3 posts
3 upvotes
seems more jobs in software development/for computer science majors. And I agreed growth and future for software development is better/higher.

is it harder to get an accounting job? Once you get your CPA isn't your life set?
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Jul 7, 2017
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GrandKnight100 wrote: is it harder to get an accounting job? Once you get your CPA isn't your life set?
Don't have/use CPAs here. Used to have 3 levels (at least) with Chartered Accountants (CAs) as top of the heap. You need to pass exams (not just school exams) to get that designation. To get ahead (i.e., make partner) you need to bring in business (so networking involved). If you are introverted and/or don't follow the established flow well, and understand processes well, compsci would be a better bet as long as you stay current (the industry changed a lot. When I was at school, Pascal was the programming language of choice and I haven't heard anything about it in years). If you are extroverted, network easily, and follow the established path well, a CA may be better.

You could also get one of the industrial designations. Businesses always need to get their basic accounting done (CAs for tax and other more complicated stuff).
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Dec 24, 2007
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GrandKnight100 wrote: Which out of these 2 is the more employable degree? The one more likely to land you a good-paying job, with good demand and job opportunities in the job market? I enjoy both and feel can be good at good. I am also open to working in different countries if required/needed.

(1) Computer science degree? (Going on to work as a software developer?)

(2) accounting degree? (Going on getting your CPA and working as an accountant?)

Thank You.
My advice: Do what you enjoy doing so that work doesn't become just work. Don't get into a career because of the $$$. If you get into a career that isn't your passion, you'll regret your choice as you'll be stuck with it for 30 - 40 years and it becomes a grind.

Accounting jobs might be more stable as Accounting has been around like forever and everybody needs Accountants. However, nobody has a crystal ball as to what the job market will look like in 5 to 10 years as the world is changing so rapidly...,globalization of everything has upturned everything. With internet connectivity many lower level accounting jobs can easily (and are being outsourced) to lower wage countries, like India. So will demand in the future for Accountants be the same? If you're mobile and willing to go anywhere in the world, then yes. If not, then maybe not so much. Note, however, that most CPAs do not stay as Accounting Technicians (doing debits and credits and preparing financial statements, which is what you learn as Accounting in school) they progress onto Financial Management.

Job opportunities in the Computer Science field probably will be greater because of the explosion in technology but is continuing to work as a software developer something you would do for 30 - 40 years?? What's beyond software developer for you, if you're in the Computer Science field, since it is pretty wide.
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Jul 31, 2017
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More better? Good thing you're not looking into English degrees.
Deal Guru
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Mar 10, 2005
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Both but chose Comp Science be prepared for constant learning /upgrading /new tech... Etc plus a comp science degree alone might not get you a good paying job from the outset. Most have to start as junior developers and work their way up. Can't speak for Accounting.
"If you want to improve, be content to be thought foolish and stupid." - Epictetus
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2010
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I feel like computer science, especially as a developer, is something you actually have to want to do. You have to build your portfolio, keep learning, keep pushing yourself, etc.

Accounting as a junior is a grind but you can just grind it. You don't have to be really excited for it, because let's face it, who is? Especially if you get into public accounting, auditing, the first few years you can basically just do as you're told and follow orders, and then move into industry or consulting or something else if you're not enjoying it.
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Dec 12, 2016
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SkynyrdsInyrds wrote: More better? Good thing you're not looking into English degrees.
I’m surprised it took that many posts before someone pointed this out.
Sr. Member
Jul 31, 2017
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Here2day2 wrote: I’m surprised it took that many posts before someone pointed this out.

I'm an English prof. I had to say something or my head would have exploded.
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Dec 27, 2013
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Aren’t some elements within the field of accounting vulnerable to replacement by AI? At the rate things are changing, I’m honestly not sure any professions are “set for life.”
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Mar 10, 2011
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Don’t go into Computer Science unless you are good at programming and like it.
Are you creative, resourceful, tenacious and good at problem solving? if yes by all means go into it.
Yes there are more good jobs in the tech industry.

But I’ve seen parents push their kids into it who were not really suited for it and it doesn’t go well with the student having to change their program at school after one year.
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Mar 6, 2015
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SkynyrdsInyrds wrote: More better? Good thing you're not looking into English degrees.
Here2day2 wrote: I’m surprised it took that many posts before someone pointed this out.
SkynyrdsInyrds wrote: I'm an English prof. I had to say something or my head would have exploded.
Biff88 wrote: Yes there are more good jobs in the tech industry.
"More good [sic]? Good thing you're not looking into English degrees" (SkynyrdsInyrds, 2021)
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Mar 6, 2015
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Biff88 wrote: Don’t go into Computer Science unless you are good at programming and like it.
Are you creative, resourceful, tenacious and good at problem solving? if yes by all means go into it.
Yes there are more good jobs in the tech industry.

But I’ve seen parents push their kids into it who were not really suited for it and it doesn’t go well with the student having to change their program at school after one year.
However, for adults what are the better jobs in the tech industry? For teenagers, how can they tell themselves that they are really suited for programming? For example, while they can go take coding courses outside of school curriculum or college ones, would they still need beginner level hobs to test their skills so that their performances can tell if they are really suited.
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Meiji: Ambassador Swanbeck, I have concluded that your treaty is NOT in the best interests of my people. So sorry, but you may not.
Swanbeck: This is an outrage!
Deal Addict
Mar 10, 2011
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cybercavalier wrote: However, for adults what are the better jobs in the tech industry?
There are a multitude of job titles and they all are good steps to go through and advance: Programmer, Developer, Software Engineer all have Junior, Intermediate, Senior levels and in the industry advancement is very rapid. After that, Solutions or Technical Architect positions can be achieved. Once in the industry, some programmers move off to roles such as Systems Analyst, Business Analyst, Project coordinator or Project Manager roles. Things are fluid and one can move off in another direction relatively easily compared to other careers.
cybercavalier wrote: For teenagers, how can they tell themselves that they are really suited for programming? For example, while they can go take coding courses outside of school curriculum or college ones, would they still need beginner level hobs to test their skills so that their performances can tell if they are really suited.
First, look at their math marks. If they are weak, then they probably wont do very well in Computer Science. Are they patient, tenacious and good at problem solving? If yes, these are good signs. Are they meticulous? When programming one needs to meticulously break down a process down to the smallest detail and build from there. Impatience and short attention span are not good traits for programmers. I believe some high schools are offering programming courses therefore a teenager can get their feet wet and see if they are good at it and also if it is something that they like.
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Jul 31, 2017
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cybercavalier wrote: "More good [sic]? Good thing you're not looking into English degrees" (SkynyrdsInyrds, 2021)
In fairness, that sentence isn't that bad.

"[T]here are more (ie. a higher number of) good jobs in the tech industry."
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Mar 6, 2015
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Biff88 wrote: There are a multitude of job titles and they all are good steps to go through and advance: Programmer, Developer, Software Engineer all have Junior, Intermediate, Senior levels and in the industry advancement is very rapid. After that, Solutions or Technical Architect positions can be achieved. Once in the industry, some programmers move off to roles such as Systems Analyst, Business Analyst, Project coordinator or Project Manager roles. Things are fluid and one can move off in another direction relatively easily compared to other careers.



First, look at their math marks. If they are weak, then they probably wont do very well in Computer Science. Are they patient, tenacious and good at problem solving? If yes, these are good signs. Are they meticulous? When programming one needs to meticulously break down a process down to the smallest detail and build from there. Impatience and short attention span are not good traits for programmers. I believe some high schools are offering programming courses therefore a teenager can get their feet wet and see if they are good at it and also if it is something that they like.
Thank this poster. These traits are helpful for potential computer science workers to test their mettle at courses.
If the post or comment helps or delights you, please CLICK that LIKE BUTTON!
Meiji: Ambassador Swanbeck, I have concluded that your treaty is NOT in the best interests of my people. So sorry, but you may not.
Swanbeck: This is an outrage!
Deal Addict
Aug 14, 2015
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Just make sure you take classes with profs who wouldn't belittle you because he couldn't help it.
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Jul 7, 2017
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Biff88 wrote: First, look at their math marks. If they are weak, then they probably wont do very well in Computer Science. Are they patient, tenacious and good at problem solving? If yes, these are good signs. Are they meticulous? When programming one needs to meticulously break down a process down to the smallest detail and build from there.
Depends on the kind of math. Some stuff such as more-esoteric calculus will probably not be needed except in some really scientific application. Universities use them as a tool to weed out the academically-weak. More a matter of process and logic (or logical process).
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May 28, 2012
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SkynyrdsInyrds wrote: I'm an English prof. I had to say something or my head would have exploded.
My head exploded years ago when young family members would say, for example, "Me and my friends are going shopping".

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