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Advice GBC vs UTM !

[OP]
Newbie
Jul 16, 2017
2 posts

Advice GBC vs UTM !

Ok so I'm in a situation right now and I really need some input/advice.
Long story short, I messed up big time at UofT, was suspended for a year due to a low GPA, took some time off to work and reevaluate. I explored a bunch of different career options and finally decided to go to GBC for a Honours Bachelors of Commerce in Financial Services. Now my previous background was in science/psychology, PsychologyI liked and did well in, Chemistry and calculus destroyed me. My issue now is that my parents are apprehensive about me going to a college because they believe that a college is going to give me problems in the future( Grad programs and hiring people will look at it like a community college degree and not a REAL uni degree) They would rather I go back to UTM ( and have a bachelor in psychology with a 2.5 GPA at most) and be unable to do anything and go back to my retail job after getting an expensive piece of paper from 'the best university in Canada'. I do understand where they are coming from and I'm sure it's not an easy road, but I am going to work extremely hard, I've done my research and I've spoken to professors at GBC and UofT. Does it really matter where I go to do my Bachelors? My only option at UofT is a psych major with 2 minors, I cannot transfer to another university, I cannot study anything else at UTM either. After completing the degree at GBC, I plan on working at a bank as an FSR and getting my CFA exams done. Maybe even applying for a masters program.
That is the plan, for now, any input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
5 replies
Jr. Member
Sep 2, 2015
120 posts
26 upvotes
East York, ON
when it comes to your education you rarely go wrong with ignoring your parents. I wish I had ignored mine and had gone to college out of high school. Instead I went to university while heavily depressed and it destroyed me. I got nothing to show for it (and the next 7-8 years, only started getting my stuff together in late 20s).

Even if it turns out it's a bad idea at least you'll know who bears responsibility for it and won't be able to use it as an excuse.
Deal Addict
Mar 6, 2015
1548 posts
251 upvotes
In addition to what Silkweave typed, analyze your previous education in terms of acquired skills -- such as presentation in writing and speech for psychology and business and math skills -- and credentials.... For decisions that important you need a specialist. Is a career advisor at job agency helpful at all?
Silkweave wrote: Even if it turns out it's a bad idea at least you'll know who bears responsibility for it and won't be able to use it as an excuse.
RFDers cannot be responsible for your career....
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Jr. Member
Sep 2, 2015
120 posts
26 upvotes
East York, ON
I'm talking about the OP. It's good to have a few failures under your belt that are entirely your fault since they're a catalyst for growth.
[OP]
Newbie
Jul 16, 2017
2 posts
Appreciate both of your input, I am trying to find a good/reasonable career counselor, no luck so far.
Member
Sep 29, 2014
231 posts
220 upvotes
Toronto, ON
I'm in my low-mid 20s and graduating from a Toronto-based law school next year. And, I am one of the biggest proponents of the age-old saying that "university is not for everyone, and is certainly not the gateway to higher riches for all." I'm also genuinely surprised that you being a few years out of high school, and having already been put on suspension for a year in university, that your parents are still putting any pressure on you to continue in an "unemployable" university program. Are your parents' Canadian educated university graduates, or are they immigrants whose only understanding of the Canadian university system, and the job market for university graduates, comes from anecdotal observations and evidence?

I did an arts degree before going to law school. 60-65% of the Canadian population now holds a degree of some sort. U of T has 60,000+ students and you are in no way a special snowflake for attending that university for a non-competitive undergraduate program. Yes, if you got into one of U of T's more prestigious graduate programs, like their medical school or law school, then that would be a different story altogether, But, they accept high school students with 70s and low 80s into their undergraduate arts/science programs. Nobody is going to be impressed that you came out of an arts/science program with a C to C+ average. It was fine for me since I came out with an A average and got into multiple law schools. But for the average joe with grades of B and lower in an arts/science program? Most of my friends and peers struggled to find decent jobs coming out, they were desperate for anything that paid even a little bit above minimum wage. You certainly will get into any "good" graduate school or professional school programs with a C average. In fact, even a B+ average (3.3), does not cut it for most of these programs anymore. Since it is highly unlikely that you're cut out for academia and graduate school, or will have the grades to get into professional school programs, what do you seriously hope to with just an undergraduate BA/BSc degree alone? I'm very surprised, and a little concerned, that you are/were a university student and didn't do more research to explore degree paths and career opportunities. If you didn't tell me that you went to university before taking time off, and are currently doing a degree in college, I would have assumed you to be a high school student.

Sure, having a degree may be helpful as some jobs have that as a basic requirement. But, then complete a degree in an "employable, practical discipline" that will get you decent jobs coming out. Not theoretical degrees in social science, life science, humanities, etc., but rather degrees in computer science, software engineering, nursing, business, etc. Look, my point is that your parents are talking about university and graduate school as if it's the ticket to you have a six figure salary job. Sure, for some people like myself it very well may be. But, for others like yourself, you need to know when it's not the path meant for you and select something else that fits with your strengths and is achievable. As for your business degree from college, yes, some graduate schools may be skeptical of it, but do you really know what graduate school even is and why people choose to continue their studies? The vast majority of masters degrees are meant for students interested in academia and research. This does not sound like you. As for professional school programs like medicine, dentistry, law, chiropody, veterinary, etc., again, these are some of the most competitive programs to get into in the country and take years of schooling and lots of dedication. It does not seem like this is the right fit for you either.

Take your business degree and run with it. It's a practical degree that has decent job prospects. Sure, you will find it hard to compete with graduates from the top business schools, but at the end of the day, experience trumps all. Instead of worrying about what your parents think and want for you, and whether you should go to university to graduate with low marks from an unemployable arts/science program and tens of thousands of dollars in debt, look for jobs and relevant experience and build your resume. Also, to counter your point about a college degree being worth less than a university degree in the job market, most employers will not care if you have good experiences, grades, personality, and charm. In fact, many of my university friends only have jobs now because they decided to go back to college for diplomas in practical fields (marketing, public relations, medical laboratory science, practical nursing, skilled trades, dental hygienist, engineering tech, and so on). You won't find a lot of posts online with a college graduate complaining about paying off their student loans and getting a decent job. You will find hundreds of posts online with regretful university students wishing they had the foresight to pursue something else and be smarter about their futures.

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