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Advice on replacing existing fridge with new one

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  • Sep 26th, 2019 6:47 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 29, 2018
52 posts
43 upvotes

Advice on replacing existing fridge with new one

Hi Guys,

Recently I have ordered a fridge of 36 inch wide to replace existing 33 inches.

Our kitchen is on the 1st floor and now suspicious if delivery guys can move the fridge up where stairs width is exact or less than 36 inches at some of the places between rails.

Anyone has been through my situation or any advice is much appreciated on whether I will see any damage to property while moving? if any foreseen incidents happened do I need to bear those expenses?
11 replies
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
18339 posts
4733 upvotes
Toronto
They wouldn't move the fridge sideways. You'll find that the fridge you ordered is not 36" thick. Furthermore, even if the thickness were a problem, they can remove the fridge doors.

The main problem is if your stairs goes around a corner or something.
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 29, 2018
52 posts
43 upvotes
yes, it goes around the corner and it is very tight to do turn. Should I take a chance to order or let it pass?
[OP]
Newbie
Dec 29, 2018
52 posts
43 upvotes
Does corner need lot of space to turn my one is 90 degree turn
Member
Dec 20, 2006
416 posts
25 upvotes
York
I wouldn't risk damaging the house for a fridge
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
18339 posts
4733 upvotes
Toronto
Chanelfashion wrote: yes, it goes around the corner and it is very tight to do turn. Should I take a chance to order or let it pass?
Hard to say. You’ll have to the measurements.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 9, 2010
2724 posts
903 upvotes
Windsor
Chanelfashion wrote: Recently I have ordered a fridge of 36 inch wide to replace existing 33 inches.

Our kitchen is on the 1st floor and now suspicious if delivery guys can move the fridge up where stairs width is exact or less than 36 inches at some of the places between rails.

Anyone has been through my situation or any advice is much appreciated on whether I will see any damage to property while moving? if any foreseen incidents happened do I need to bear those expenses?
The fridge is 36" wide, but probably "only" 30" deep (removing the doors, even less deep), so it's likely to fit. If you can remove railings (not a bannister, but like cheap bolt-on railings), that might not be the worst idea either.

Now, you said the fridge is on the 1st floor; how many steps does it take to get up to your 1st floor? Do you only have 1 way in to your house? I brought a piano in through my garage (straight shot), and my appliances through the sliding door in the back. Regardless, a 36" fridge is barely larger than a 33" fridge, and the important dimension (minimum dimension) is likely identical to your old fridge.

I have no advice on damage; I'd say, logically, they'll cover any unreasonable damage, but I don't know.

Maybe snap a pic of the situation you're dealing with; it seems unlikely you'll have an issue getting onto the 1st floor.
One who is offended by truth, has no place among those who seek wisdom.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2014
3325 posts
610 upvotes
I do know of one person who had to sign a paper that basically said that the homeowner would be responsible for any damage to the house when an appliance did not easily fit. It is different when a smaller appliance hits the walls due to negligence on the part of the delivery people.

This was a few years ago. Now if there is any doubt, many stores will send an appliance person (or someone) over to measure to ensure that the new appliance will fit. There will likely be a cost for this. But it is often better to find out first. Too many stores have had returns - 25% restock fee notwithstanding. This is why many stores have started to do this - according to the appliance stores. You can read about it. You are obviously concerned about it so perhaps you should look into it since no one on an internet forum can tell you what will happen.

We are in a bad situation which is why I know. Replacement is going to be very difficult - actually impossible.
Deal Addict
Jan 5, 2003
4189 posts
3467 upvotes
Toronto
Get some cardboard and cut it to the size of the fridge's width and depth. If you don't know the depth without the doors, go to a store and measure it. If you have enough cardboard, mock up the full size, but most people probably don't have enough cardboard lying around. Instead, make two pieces of cardboard to represent the top and bottom and get some poles, broom handles, hockey sticks, etc. to attach to them to represent the sides (height). You now have a light fridge "outline" to try to get through your stairs. Even if don't have poles, etc. for the height, just having the top and bottom represented will help a lot. When you have the bottom cardboard in a tight spot, hold the top cardboard where the top of the fridge will be to make sure you're not going to be hitting something.

Much more fool-proof to try it with a mock up vs. relying on measuring tapes, especially if you're going around curves/corners. Yeah, it's a little bit of arts and crafts work, but can potentially save a huge hassle. I know people who told delivery people exact measurements and they said it won't be problem, and it WAS a problem.

Keep in mind clearances (a few extra inches) for fingers and arms. As others have said, you might need to remove the handrail to gain several inches. Don't try to lift it over the handrail...
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 9, 2003
1419 posts
235 upvotes
Grimsby
I do not think you will get it done. Many years ago we tried to deliver a 2 glass door pop cooler 60 inches wide in this situation. We the mere peons doing the grunting said it was not possible. Our boss who wanted the sale and the buyer who wanted it done disagreed so we tried - and failed.

The issue is when you get to the corner it is necessary to have the cooler exactly upright to negotiate the turn, not leaning as it will be on the easier straight rise. There is no room at the front for the guy/s to lift and the guy/s at the rear need to lift quite high to get the thing level.

The idea jm1 (above) has with a cardboard mock up is sound except you need to add thoughts regarding the sheer weight and the capabilities of those doing the grunting. Can you rely on them not to drop a corner etc.
Deal Expert
Mar 23, 2009
18339 posts
4733 upvotes
Toronto
Owbist wrote: I do not think you will get it done. Many years ago we tried to deliver a 2 glass door pop cooler 60 inches wide in this situation. We the mere peons doing the grunting said it was not possible. Our boss who wanted the sale and the buyer who wanted it done disagreed so we tried - and failed.

The issue is when you get to the corner it is necessary to have the cooler exactly upright to negotiate the turn, not leaning as it will be on the easier straight rise. There is no room at the front for the guy/s to lift and the guy/s at the rear need to lift quite high to get the thing level.

The idea jm1 (above) has with a cardboard mock up is sound except you need to add thoughts regarding the sheer weight and the capabilities of those doing the grunting. Can you rely on them not to drop a corner etc.
60 inches is a completely different story. Obviously what applies for 60" doesn't apply for 36".
Deal Guru
Feb 7, 2017
14986 posts
12112 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
EugW wrote: Hard to say. You’ll have to the measurements.
This

Find the fridge on line ... the website should have all the dimensions you’ll need

Shipped size ... Height, Width, Depth (with & without doors)

As well as what dimensions you’ll need take into consideration for installation

Height + Clearance / Air Circulation Allowance
Depth + Clearance / Air Circulation Allowance
Width + Clearance / Air Circulation Allowance + DOORS OPEN SWING

Fridges cuz the doors come off, and are often wider than they are deep is usually not a big deal to get into a house (front door entry width) or into place (door frame width ... or Stairway / Hallway width).

More often or not it’s the resting spot for the fridge that’s the issue
Not enough clearance around the appliance for proper air circulation
Or space for the door / doors to fully open

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