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Advise needed for bent copper pipe water service line

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  • Jul 8th, 2021 11:06 am
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 4, 2020
17 posts
2 upvotes

Advise needed for bent copper pipe water service line

Hello experts,

The copper water pipe coming into the house is bent as showing in the picture. Also, the clamp for the ground wire over clamped on the pipe.

What would be the best option to fix it? I guess have to cut the concrete slab, and what kind of fitting should be used under the slab?

Many many thanks!
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16 replies
Sr. Member
Jan 21, 2011
835 posts
349 upvotes
GTA
Best to probably to cut out concrete, pull the pipe up where it is good and start fresh from that location if not too much of a bad spot. That copper pipe is normally a little flexible.

How long were you living in the house? Seems like that has been the way for a good while.
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 4, 2020
17 posts
2 upvotes
lamin wrote: Best to probably to cut out concrete, pull the pipe up where it is good and start fresh from that location if not too much of a bad spot. That copper pipe is normally a little flexible.

How long were you living in the house? Seems like that has been the way for a good while.
Yes, it’s been like that for a while. I agree the best way is pull out the pipe after cutting the concrete instead of having a joint under the slab.

In case if the pipe is not long enough to pull, what would be the proper joint under the slab? I heard some plumbers saying to use corporation coupling? What’s the difference between corporation coupling vs compress coupling?
[OP]
Newbie
Oct 4, 2020
17 posts
2 upvotes
tempperm wrote: Why do u want to fix?
Plan to furnish the room, putting tiles on the floor. Want to make sure everything is ok
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Feb 11, 2007
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Oakville
ftaman99 wrote: Plan to furnish the room, putting tiles on the floor. Want to make sure everything is ok
Doesn't look like there's anything seriously wrong, do not worth touching unless you want to relocate it or something.
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Deal Addict
Nov 17, 2012
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Toronto
If it was me, I'd have it done now before you finish the room.

Depending on the routing of the water line underground, they might be able to bust up the concrete and pull the line up a foot or so away from it's current location to expose fresh pipe for a new valve and connection to your home plumbing. You'd want a 1/4 turn valve installed at that point, and of course this will require the city to turn off the water from outside.

Call a plumber and get an estimate - see what they suggest.

Is the water main in a utility room space near the furnace with a floor drain? Naturally given the apparent age of the pipe and lack of leaking now, it's probably going to be fine for another 30 years, but if that starts to leak, there's no turning it off quickly and your basement will be flooded.
Deal Addict
Nov 9, 2008
1766 posts
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Toronto
Why does the pipe narrow so much around the clamp? Has the clamp crushed the pipe? Doesn't look right, definitely have a plumber look at this. It's before the shutoff so you'll need to have water service shut off at the curb if you want to address this.

And are you sure this is copper service? Hard to tell from the photo. The irregular bulging of the pipe is commonly seen with lead service pipes (we had lead service when we bought our place and it looked similar)
Deal Guru
Feb 9, 2006
12441 posts
7032 upvotes
Brampton
Not sure where you are. (Maybe Toronto)

But it won't be cheap. Looks like they damaged the pipe with the grounding clamp by over tightening it in addition to the tweak in the line.

This is what needs to happen.
- They'll have to call the local government (town etc) to turn off the water outside (the plumber might be allowed to do this depending on local bylaws). The town/city may charge you for this.
- Here's the kicker why you can't avoid not calling the town. There's not a lot of room between the main coming from the ground to the meter tail You'll need someone from the gov to inspect it prior to confirm no one's tampered with the meter. They might ask for pictures etc of before and not send someone.
- Break the ground replace the line (inspection maybe required before filling the hole)
- The plumber might be able to reinstall the meter with the correct meter tail (again local laws)
- Town/city needs to reinspect the meter and tag/apply tamper proof tag

A licensed plumber maybe able skip a couple steps (Self inspect, shutoff) depending on local laws in this but not the meter part.

It's going to run like $1K+ again depending on where you are.
Sr. Member
Mar 10, 2004
762 posts
274 upvotes
Unless you have major water pressure issues i would not touch. If you are gonna touch i d consider having the copper supply line upgraded to 3/4 inch while you are at it.
Deal Fanatic
Jul 7, 2017
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SW corner of the cou…
tebore wrote: This is what needs to happen.
- They'll have to call the local government (town etc) to turn off the water outside (the plumber might be allowed to do this depending on local bylaws). The town/city may charge you for this.
Interesting. The governmental body that supplies water where I am say they will come out to shut water on and off for you, free of charge. I seem to remember when I called them, it was subtly implied I could just use a wrench to do the same and save them the bother.
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Feb 9, 2006
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Brampton
thriftshopper wrote: Interesting. The governmental body that supplies water where I am say they will come out to shut water on and off for you, free of charge. I seem to remember when I called them, it was subtly implied I could just use a wrench to do the same and save them the bother.
I highly doubt you could use a wrench.

In many parts of Canada the curb stops require a "key" that's buried under the frost line usually at the edge of the property line. Only certain licensed plumbers have these keys.
Some municipalities charge (IIRC Toronto does) some don't when they have to come out do turn it in and off.

Why does it matter in this case? This isn't some regular plumbing fixture. The OPs picture is of their main shut off/meter so they need the curb stop shut off.
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Jul 7, 2017
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tebore wrote: I highly doubt you could use a wrench.

In many parts of Canada the curb stops require a "key" that's buried under the frost line usually at the edge of the property line. Only certain licensed plumbers have these keys.
Some municipalities charge (IIRC Toronto does) some don't when they have to come out do turn it in and off.

Why does it matter in this case? This isn't some regular plumbing fixture. The OPs picture is of their main shut off/meter so they need the curb stop shut off.
WP_20210706_14_27_59_Pro.jpg


There's been at least two occasions in the past 4-5 years that have resulted in two frozen (and burst) frost-free outdoor spigots. I am surprised the water meter, valve and pipe have never frozen. Maybe the surrounding soil always has enough latent heat.
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Newbie
Feb 28, 2021
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thriftshopper wrote: Interesting. The governmental body that supplies water where I am say they will come out to shut water on and off for you, free of charge. I seem to remember when I called them, it was subtly implied I could just use a wrench to do the same and save them the bother.
I’m sure it’s changed since 15 years ago but when I did plumbing as a summer job in Kitchener the policy was always to let the city do it. If we turned it off and something broke we were on the hook for the cost to fix it. If the city turned it off and something broke it was on their dime to fix it.
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Jul 7, 2017
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thebluegoat wrote: I’m sure it’s changed since 15 years ago but when I did plumbing as a summer job in Kitchener the policy was always to let the city do it. If we turned it off and something broke we were on the hook for the cost to fix it. If the city turned it off and something broke it was on their dime to fix it.
Excellent advice especially if the water is hard and prone to hardened sediments and deposits. Not a problem here (water is so soft it results in those who grew up here having poor teeth). I shut mine off to install another shut-off valve - the original one was right in the middle of the house a few dozen feet from where the supply (PEX, fortunately) came into the house.
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Jun 24, 2015
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its either the city or the municipality depending on if the city you live has been amalgamated with the municipality.

For example, if you lived in North York in the past, it used to be the Regional Municipality of Toronto (Metro) who shut off the water, now since amalgamation it is the City of Toronto who shuts off the water for north york, infact north york does not exist any more its also the city of toronto.

if your in Woodbridge, its the regional municipality of York who shuts off the water.
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