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Air Canada Announces Plans to Retire Embraer 190 Fleet

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  • Feb 26th, 2018 12:58 pm
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Air Canada Announces Plans to Retire Embraer 190 Fleet

Air Canada has announced that it will retire its twenty-five Embraer 190 aircraft within the next 18 months. The airline made the announcement as it prepares to take delivery of its new Bombardier CS300 aircraft, which is slated to be delivered late 2019.

https://airlinegeeks.com/2018/02/22/air ... 190-fleet/
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I like the prospect of sitting in seats that are 18.5 inches wide and being able to book two seats together for a couple without an adjacent seatmate. The C-Series aircraft have a 2-3 seating layout, and the fuselage width will not allow Air Canada to squeeze a 6th seat into the row, so they can not make the seat any smaller either. The 787 "dreamliner" we are flying to Europe this spring has a 3-3-3 layout with only 17.3 inch wide seats.
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Those EJ's are old so I'm not surprised that they are retiring them. Plus, AC can push the PR angle about buying Canadian. I expect them to advertise that fact once they take delivery.
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craftsman wrote: Those EJ's are old so I'm not surprised that they are retiring them. Plus, AC can push the PR angle about buying Canadian. I expect them to advertise that fact once they take delivery.
10 years old according to the article. The first planes of that model went to market in 2004 when JetBlue started using them.

Delta will have the CS as well. The Bombardier Q400 is quite Canadian, but Porter & Westjet fly them as well. In the summer, despite 3 airlines, it is the only passenger plane that lands here in Moncton.

If you have the Flight Radar app, you can filter to the CS and admire Canadian ingenuity as the planes fly all over Europe. The flights are less impressive for Swissair, but Air Baltic’s trans-Europe network lets you fantasize about the routes here in North America, assuming you forget how small Europe actually is.
Toronto is a very small part of Canada
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Dealmaker1945 wrote: I like the prospect of sitting in seats that are 18.5 inches wide and being able to book two seats together for a couple without an adjacent seatmate. The C-Series aircraft have a 2-3 seating layout, and the fuselage width will not allow Air Canada to squeeze a 6th seat into the row, so they can not make the seat any smaller either. The 787 "dreamliner" we are flying to Europe this spring has a 3-3-3 layout with only 17.3 inch wide seats.
The E-190 with Air Canada has no middle seats. So that’s actually a minus for the Bombardier plane, unless you enjoy middle seats.
https://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Air_C ... er_190.php

The CS won’t be flying to Europe from Canada. Bigger planes are more fuel efficient per seat on long journeys.
Toronto is a very small part of Canada
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MonctonMan wrote: The E-190 with Air Canada has no middle seats. So that’s actually a minus for the Bombardier plane, unless you enjoy middle seats.
https://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Air_C ... er_190.php

The CS won’t be flying to Europe from Canada. Bigger planes are more fuel efficient per seat on long journeys.
As a couple on Airbus/737 flights we usually sit aisle and centre. At least the centre seat on the CS is 19 inches (wider than the aisle seat), so I expect significantly more space.

We won't see the CS-300 on the high volume dreamliner routes, but it does suit lower density routes, e.g. Toronto - Dublin is comfortably within its range at seat costs comparable with larger equipment. It was reported that Air Canada is looking at the European options for this aircraft, although the priority will be the existing E-190 routes.
Last edited by Dealmaker1945 on Feb 23rd, 2018 8:58 am, edited 1 time in total.
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10 years is not an old age at all for airliners. The best US airline Delta has an average fleet age of about 17 years, with many aircraft more than 20 years old. It all comes down to how long it is cost-effective to maintain a given type.
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I'll miss the E190's 2-2 layout (and 1-2 in J) but I won't miss the way the seats in Y make my back hurt. Never figured out why exactly it is (although I suspect it's the backrest angle) but the seats on a 190 make me really uncomfortable after a fairly short time. It's the only aircraft where I really have to try and recline a little bit.
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kavatski wrote: I'll miss the E190's 2-2 layout (and 1-2 in J) but I won't miss the way the seats in Y make my back hurt. Never figured out why exactly it is (although I suspect it's the backrest angle) but the seats on a 190 make me really uncomfortable after a fairly short time. It's the only aircraft where I really have to try and recline a little bit.
I'm a big fan of the E90, although overhead space was limited even in the front cabin. It felt more "intimate" and it was nice to have sit in the lone J seats on the left side.
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MonctonMan wrote: The E-190 with Air Canada has no middle seats. So that’s actually a minus for the Bombardier plane, unless you enjoy middle seats.
https://www.seatguru.com/airlines/Air_C ... er_190.php

The CS won’t be flying to Europe from Canada. Bigger planes are more fuel efficient per seat on long journeys.
But the E-190's have that strange row 'A' where there is no overhead storage AND the underseat storage is about a 1/3 of normal planes. In today's environment of carry-on being king, it's far from the ideal configuration.
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Dealmaker1945 wrote: We won't see the CS-300 on the high volume dreamliner routes, but it does suit lower density routes, e.g. Toronto - Dublin is comfortably within its range at seat costs comparable with larger equipment.
Source about seat costs?

Here is how Bombardier marketed the range:
https://commercialaircraft.bombardier.c ... ities.html

With curfews in both Toronto and Dublin, and Toronto being a hub, I’m sure Air Canada can fill bigger planes on that route. The CSeries is more of a Fort McMurray or Victoria to everywhere in North America type of plane, with emergency airports below. Or providing high frequency on routes where there is demand.

Maybe Porter will use them in their new base in Thunder Bay. ;)
Toronto is a very small part of Canada
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McKinsey wrote: I'm a big fan of the E90, although overhead space was limited even in the front cabin. It felt more "intimate" and it was nice to have sit in the lone J seats on the left side.
Agreed. I always take an A seat in J if I can. The bins over D/F are deeper then they are in Y so as long as everyone puts their bag in the right way I've never had a problem getting mine up there too.
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MonctonMan wrote: Source about seat costs?

Here is how Bombardier marketed the range:
https://commercialaircraft.bombardier.c ... ities.html

With curfews in both Toronto and Dublin, and Toronto being a hub, I’m sure Air Canada can fill bigger planes on that route. The CSeries is more of a Fort McMurray or Victoria to everywhere in North America type of plane, with emergency airports below. Or providing high frequency on routes where there is demand.

Maybe Porter will use them in their new base in Thunder Bay. ;)
"said Benjamin Smith, President of Passenger Airlines for Air Canada. “The economics – it’s got CASM rates that are equivalent to much larger airplanes."

See also:
https://www.airinsight.com/cseries-beat ... ile-costs/

Dublin may not be a good example but it seems that the CS does have enough legs to establish a thin transatlantic route.

BTW I would love to see Porter operating the CS out of Hamilton John C. Munro.
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I liked these planes. No middle seat. Great seat to Aisle ratio. No mobs at the boarding gate. Quick to board and unboard. Trolley didn't take ages to make it to the back of the plane.

Will miss them, but the C series do look nice!
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4seasonscentre wrote: I liked these planes. No middle seat. Great seat to Aisle ratio. No mobs at the boarding gate. Quick to board and unboard. Trolley didn't take ages to make it to the back of the plane.

Will miss them, but the C series do look nice!
I agree completely. These are the only RJs I can say honestly say that I enjoy flying on. I'm sure that the CS will be nice but I'll miss the E90.
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I feel altruistic flying made in Brazil planes. Why donate to UNICEF when you can fly on an Embraer? And with all that cheap Brazilian labour, I’m probably getting a deal to. :)

Brazil does export US$3.8 billion a year in military equipment. I didn’t dare google to whom.

Brazil also inexplicably spends US$40 billion a year on national defence. That’s way more than Canada does. I guess it enables Brazil to threaten war with France over lobster, and win. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lobster_War
Toronto is a very small part of Canada
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kavatski wrote: Agreed. I always take an A seat in J if I can. The bins over D/F are deeper then they are in Y so as long as everyone puts their bag in the right way I've never had a problem getting mine up there too.
I'm on 4 of these birds weekly, and if I am not mistaken, those bins can accommodate 6 bags (if put in properly) for 9 seats, and then the bulkhead folks also have to put their laptop/backpacks. It sucks for those boarding late (e.g. standby).

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