Automotive

Airwheel X3 Electric Unicycle cool

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 28th, 2015 10:46 pm
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7 replies
Jr. Member
May 17, 2012
129 posts
12 upvotes
Toronto, Canada
You seriously think this is worth $632?

Buy a bicycle or an e-bike instead.
[OP]
Banned
Oct 23, 2013
11 posts
3 upvotes
Toronto, ON
Any mistake? It's less than $600 and it is the cheapest one I can find. OH..
ezconnect wrote: You seriously think this is worth $632?

Buy a bicycle or an e-bike instead.
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2004
1273 posts
11 upvotes
Edmonton
I bought a similar one of these, not an airwheel but a CXM. It's a blast to ride and it is actually useful if you commute. It's so small that you can just throw it in the trunk of your car. And you don't have to worry about parking an expensive electric bike outside because you can just carry it like a suitcase and put it under your desk. The charger is light too so you can charge it at work. I sometimes have a 27 minute walk in downtown Edmonton from where I park to the office. Last week I took the wheel and it took only 15 minutes, and it was fun instead of tedious. Once you get some practice, you can mingle amongst pedestrians when the sidewalk is conjested and then blow past them when the path opens up. Nobody has seen anything like this before so you get a lot of attention, and that could be a plus or a minus depending on your personality. The other advantage is both of your hands are free if you want to drink a coffee, talk on the phone or carry an umbrella. That, and you don't get sweaty.

Be careful with the listed specs though. With a 132wh battery I only get about 8km range. I weigh about 95 kilos, so if you weigh less you'll get more. Top speed on mine is 14km/h before it starts beeping at you. Not blisteringly fast, but about 2.5 times faster than walking. It sure feels fast when you are passing pedestrians anyway. I've driven it on gravel, grass, dirt, shale, pavement, wood plank sidewalk etc. It's very versatile. My least favorite to drive on is soft grass, the other surfaces seem to do just fine.

If you know Edmonton at all, there is a hill downtown called Bellamy Hill. I was able to easily go all the way down and back up with no issue. Very impressive. The wheel will go down significantly steeper grades than it will up. Mine is rated at 30 degree incline.

As for the learning curve, within 10 minutes I could ride in a straght line. It took about 3 days until I was comfortable enough to take it downtown. The first part of the learning resulted in sore calves and blisters on your ankles from gripping the device too tightly between your legs, but that stops once you get better. Now after about a week I can do tight circles and am going to attempt to learn to ride backwards. Yesterday I used it to tow my two kids in their red wagon, they thought that was pretty fun. My wife has been learning too, it's taken her a bit longer but after a week she can almost comfortably drive it around the sidewalks in our neighbourhood.

I bought this thing as a toy mostly, wanted something to take camping. But after using it I can definately see how it could be useful as a serious commuting tool within it's limitations. If that's your goal you'd want one with a bigger battery though.
[OP]
Banned
Oct 23, 2013
11 posts
3 upvotes
Toronto, ON
woo..it seems it is a good toy for you :D anyway, i have bought the airwheel and used it for more than a month.good for me too. :D
xoltri wrote: I bought a similar one of these, not an airwheel but a CXM. It's a blast to ride and it is actually useful if you commute. It's so small that you can just throw it in the trunk of your car. And you don't have to worry about parking an expensive electric bike outside because you can just carry it like a suitcase and put it under your desk. The charger is light too so you can charge it at work. I sometimes have a 27 minute walk in downtown Edmonton from where I park to the office. Last week I took the wheel and it took only 15 minutes, and it was fun instead of tedious. Once you get some practice, you can mingle amongst pedestrians when the sidewalk is conjested and then blow past them when the path opens up. Nobody has seen anything like this before so you get a lot of attention, and that could be a plus or a minus depending on your personality. The other advantage is both of your hands are free if you want to drink a coffee, talk on the phone or carry an umbrella. That, and you don't get sweaty.

Be careful with the listed specs though. With a 132wh battery I only get about 8km range. I weigh about 95 kilos, so if you weigh less you'll get more. Top speed on mine is 14km/h before it starts beeping at you. Not blisteringly fast, but about 2.5 times faster than walking. It sure feels fast when you are passing pedestrians anyway. I've driven it on gravel, grass, dirt, shale, pavement, wood plank sidewalk etc. It's very versatile. My least favorite to drive on is soft grass, the other surfaces seem to do just fine.

If you know Edmonton at all, there is a hill downtown called Bellamy Hill. I was able to easily go all the way down and back up with no issue. Very impressive. The wheel will go down significantly steeper grades than it will up. Mine is rated at 30 degree incline.

As for the learning curve, within 10 minutes I could ride in a straght line. It took about 3 days until I was comfortable enough to take it downtown. The first part of the learning resulted in sore calves and blisters on your ankles from gripping the device too tightly between your legs, but that stops once you get better. Now after about a week I can do tight circles and am going to attempt to learn to ride backwards. Yesterday I used it to tow my two kids in their red wagon, they thought that was pretty fun. My wife has been learning too, it's taken her a bit longer but after a week she can almost comfortably drive it around the sidewalks in our neighbourhood.

I bought this thing as a toy mostly, wanted something to take camping. But after using it I can definately see how it could be useful as a serious commuting tool within it's limitations. If that's your goal you'd want one with a bigger battery though.
Newbie
Sep 27, 2015
1 posts
Richmond Hill, ON
I would suggest to buy it or you can also rent it. It is really worth it. It is very good for commuting, run errands or just for pure pleasure. Specially if your commuting is less than 5 kms, if not, its main advantage is that is portable, so you can take it with you and combine with other forms of transportation.

Check this article where I discuss my experience looking for a solution to my daily commute at Toronto where I ride the Viva Bus to get to Newmarket in Ontario, Canada: http://transportatil.com/blogs/news/547 ... le-problem
you can also find more commuting experiences at my blog at http://transportatil.com .

In my case I use a Portable Electric Unicycle, theAirwheel X3 170 wh to go 1.7 kms from my house to the rapid bus stop (Viva Bus), it takes me 7 minutes, my top speed is 13.7 kms/hr when I go on the street that has low traffic. When I get on streets with heavy traffic I go on the sidewalk, here your speed is slower as the road is not as smooth and you have to watch for pedestrians. Before getting to my bus stop, I stop and buy a coffee, as your hands are free is something that I enjoy as part of my morning commute, riding, and enjoying a coffee, meanwhile I go to take my bus. Then I get on the bus, a rapid bus that takes me 25 kms. The Airwheel weights 9.8 kgs so it is not that heavy, so I can perfectly carry it as a portfolio, and then put it under my seat, on my laps, or if there is no seat on the bus, I put it in the middle of the legs. Then I get off and continue riding on it for other 1.7 kms this time to my work. Commuting this way saved me from buying another car. We already have one car as we have small children, so not having a car would be very difficult. However, commuting is normally a solo thing. Here is where the Airwheel can be a very feasible solution. I have seen many trends where cars are getting smaller and smaller, I would say that the Airwheel is a leap forward in this trend, how much smaller can cars be? The Airwheel is already there.

At work, sometimes I need to do some interoffice commuting and go to another office that is at 2.8 kms. I think this segment is similar to the situation you describe. I love this ride because I go on a paved trail, that goes alog a river. No stopsI feel sorry for my coworkers that have to use their car. Sometimes I can't believe I'm heading to a meeting as I'm enjoying nature, driking a coffee (yes, I love driking coffee while I ride!). It takes me 17 mins to get there, my top speed is 13 kms/hr.

Again if your main objective is to get some help in your commute, this is an excellent solution. It is also very good to run short errands, that are less than 5 kms. I find myself forgetting about the milk during my weekly shopping, just to have an excuse to go to the convenience store riding on it. Needless to say that it is also a very good solution to just mess around and go to the trails I do this and it is very pleasant as well.

[IMG]http://transportatil.com/blogs/news/547 ... le-problem[/IMG]

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