Health & Wellness

Alcohol-free Hand Sanitizer Not Work for COVID 19!

[OP]
Member
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Sep 25, 2019
461 posts
713 upvotes

Alcohol-free Hand Sanitizer Not Work for COVID 19!

I want to share this, as we just learned the non-alcohol hand sanitizer is not as good (sellerse do not tell you); for non-alcohol, we have to rub hands for much longer (up to 10 mins).
"Alcohol-free hand sanitizer prices are skyrocketing, but they don't actually work to prevent the coronavirus"

We buy many bottles from Soapopular, but they not share information that CDC not support Soapopular for COVID 19.
Image

From CDC (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nc ... e-faq.html):
Are benzalkonium chloride-containing hand rub products an acceptable alternative to ABHR for COVID-19?

CDC does not have a recommended alternative to hand rub products with greater than 60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol as active ingredients. Benzalkonium chloride, along with both ethanol and isopropanol, is deemed eligible by FDAexternal icon for use in the formulation of healthcare personnel hand rubs. However, available evidence indicates benzalkonium chloride has less reliable activity against coronavirus than either of the alcohols.
8 replies
Deal Fanatic
Dec 5, 2006
9231 posts
4511 upvotes
Markham
No hand sanitizer companies will say their products can kill covid-19
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 6, 2004
8281 posts
2036 upvotes
Mississauga
MikuGirl wrote: I want to share this, as we just learned the non-alcohol hand sanitizer is not as good (sellerse do not tell you); for non-alcohol, we have to rub hands for much longer (up to 10 mins).
"Alcohol-free hand sanitizer prices are skyrocketing, but they don't actually work to prevent the coronavirus"

We buy many bottles from Soapopular, but they not share information that CDC not support Soapopular for COVID 19.
Image

From CDC (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nc ... e-faq.html):
This isn't exactly new news, and it's lacking effectiveness was well known even before the Coronavirus came to town.
Deal Addict
Nov 28, 2013
1225 posts
426 upvotes
London, ON
same thing with wet one wipes - no alcohol no solution to covid
Deal Addict
User avatar
Sep 19, 2002
3602 posts
2327 upvotes
Vancouver
Not really news. Why do you think everyone in the Hot Deals forum asks how much alcohol content there is before buying?

It's like buying a mask without a PP layer.
Deal Addict
Apr 5, 2007
1585 posts
733 upvotes
Canada
amz155 wrote: ...yet it is listed here on Health Canada’s list of antiseptic/antibacterial skin cleansers or hand sanitizers meet Health Canada's requirements for safety, effectiveness and quality:

https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/ ... .html#tbl1


Face With Stuck-out Tongue And Tightly-closed Eyes
The Health Canada site list all approved hand sanitizing products (alcohol, BZK and otherwise) for the DIN or NPN number - it is not meant to mean they are effective against COVID.
The hard surface sanitizer page, on the other hand, is specific to COVID.
Newbie
Jan 15, 2008
48 posts
6 upvotes
Toronto
MikuGirl wrote: From CDC (https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-nc ... e-faq.html): "... Available evidence indicates benzalkonium chloride has less reliable activity against coronavirus than either of the alcohols."
I believe that Lysol and Clorox wipes — and most competing generics — contain benzalkonium chloride or other quaternary ammonium compounds ("quats"), but not alcohol.

I wonder why this is. Are quats cheaper than alcohol? Are they less toxic, in case a toddler accidentally swallows some of the wipe solution? Is there some other reason?
Sr. Member
Aug 14, 2015
951 posts
579 upvotes
Burnaby, BC
unforgettableid wrote: I believe that Lysol and Clorox wipes — and most competing generics — contain benzalkonium chloride or other quaternary ammonium compounds ("quats"), but not alcohol.
Lysol and Clorox wipes both contains alcohol, but neither of them have sufficient concentration level to disinfect coronavirus.
I wonder why this is. Are quats cheaper than alcohol? Are they less toxic, in case a toddler accidentally swallows some of the wipe solution? Is there some other reason?
I don't know the answer to this question, but quats are more toxic than alcohol based wipes.

An educated guess may be that Isopropyl alcohol and ethanol alcohol both produce unpleasant smells that couldn't completely be covered up by fragrance.
The other would be that quats have a slippery nature to it that enhances what cleaning feels like.
Another is that alcohol causes dryness to your own skin, tilting the balance of what customers would buy to wipe their hands with.

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