Food & Drink

For all the wine experts.. which one to buy to store for many years?

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  • Aug 5th, 2020 1:40 pm
[OP]
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Sep 30, 2009
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Richmond Hill

For all the wine experts.. which one to buy to store for many years?

Question for all the wine experts on here.. I'd like to buy a few bottles / or maybe a case of red wine from 2019 (must be from 2019) to store. Looking to store for at least 19+ years..

I personally know nothing about red wine apart from telling if it's earthy or fruity. Any good recommendations on what might age well? I don't want something overly expensive, maybe below $30 / bottle.

I figure I'd ask here first instead of going to LCBO and picking a random one
17 replies
Deal Addict
Jun 8, 2005
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If this is one of those "birth year of my child" wine things, you should consider Port, as it ages well.
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Jul 14, 2006
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Let me jump into my time machine and let you know which ones aged the best.
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May 16, 2005
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Any worthwhile 2019 wine that can age for 19+ years will not be on store shelves yet. Typically it'll take at least 2-3 years of barrel age before they are bottled and sold to the consumers.
In most cases, Bordeaux red wine is considered the most suited for aging for long time. Its consistent quality across all price ranges and is available to end consumers. There are others like Burgundy that may have higher quality for some of the higher end wine, but its not as consistent across the board.
Like the other poster suggested, Port will age forever, and typically the quality is pretty consistent across the board, but its an acquired taste whether you enjoy drinking port. Some others to consider would be good wines from Rhone (CDP, Hermitage), Barolo, and Brunello Di Montalcino.
I would stay away from Australian or Napa, unless its really high end.

Suggestion, if you are in Ontario, wait till the fall. That is when LCBO will offer the futures for the 2019 bordeaux vintage. You order now, pay a deposit, and in 2022 you pick up the wine when its released and pay the balance.
So far, the critics have generally found 2019 bordeaux to be a very good vintage, and with the global economy the way it is, the futures price on the vintage have been 10-20% lower than what 2018 was. The US already had their first tranche of the 2019 futures starting in May/June this year. Canadians are always behind.

Some bordeaux that would be in your $30 price range with aging potential, and available at LCBO futures:
Cantermerle
Senejac
Labegorce
Barde Haut
Chateau Tour St. Christophe
Capbern
Lafon Rochet
Lilian Laduoys
These are typically in the 30-60 dollar range.
The other challenge for you is, do you have the proper storage to keep the wine in good condition for 19+ years? Wine needs to be stored in a dark, chilled, consistent temp(57-65) range.
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Oct 7, 2007
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While wine is a matter of taste and preference, Sonoma Valley (California) wines have been excellent in the past.
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May 10, 2005
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I really need to question why? Why buy and put it away for many years? Why not buy and drink it??
If it is to build up a cellar then just buy a bunch and drink it as you want.

We are wine drinkers and have quite a selection and it never made any sense or value to have wine in the cellar that I could not or should not drink for 5 to 10 years.
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Dec 9, 2003
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With respect to Commie above. While Bordeaux generally are considered good aging wines, my experience over the years with medium priced (ie $30) Bordeaux is that they have not aged well. Frankly I have done better with Chilean, Argentinian, Australian heavy reds - Malbecs or Cab Sauv etc. Right now I have to say that of my 1995-2005 wines (so around 20 years old) I am far happier with the new world wines.
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Jul 7, 2017
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A few considerations (actually about 3) in addition to those mentioned above

1) storage conditions - even o.k. wines will store/age reasonably well if stored well. That means temperatures should never go above 18C (cooler such as 15C) is better. Exposure to higher temperatures will cook the wine or at least cause it to age faster. You end up with something that tastes like unsweetened i.e., fortified sherry.

2) closures. Cork (real - either whole or reconstituted) is permeable and will cause the wine to "age". You have to keep the cork moist (hence why stored wine is usually layed it on its side or even upside down) otherwise it'll dry out. For wines that are stored for decades, corks are even changed. You also run the risk of corked wines - wine spoiled because of naturally-occurring microorganisms in the cork (usual and most apparent symptom is the wine smelling like wet cardboard). Of course, synthetic corks appear to get around this, as do the twist-top/Stelvin closures. It is said (by winemakers) that wine ages minimally with these twist top closures.

3) Tannins. If you want to assess what stores well, a very full-bodied red wine per above is generally a good guide. Even better is tasting. If drunk young, the tannins (makes your mouth pucker) should be heavy. Tannins are natural preservatives found in the skins of dark grapes and also oak wood. They mellow out over time.

If you go to a vineyard, ask the winemaker (especially in smaller wineries). Usually it'll be heavy reds, and high alcohol (>14% ABV). Bordeaux AC and sub-appellation (e.g., Pomerol, St Emilion, Medoc) blends cited above are usually a combination of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot (among others). Cabernet Franc is used too but this wine s a little light. Another good one is Malbec (better known as Cahors AC wine from France, and wines from Argentina). Shiraz/Syrahs (Rhône valley, and also Australia) are also good. Avoid Gamay Noirs (used in Beaujolais nouveau) - a wine to be drunk young and most Pinot Noirs (Burgundy).
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May 16, 2005
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Cough wrote: With respect to Commie above. While Bordeaux generally are considered good aging wines, my experience over the years with medium priced (ie $30) Bordeaux is that they have not aged well. Frankly I have done better with Chilean, Argentinian, Australian heavy reds - Malbecs or Cab Sauv etc. Right now I have to say that of my 1995-2005 wines (so around 20 years old) I am far happier with the new world wines.
Guess that is the fun part of wine...everyone's palette is different and have a different enjoyment level. For myself, Bordeaux have always aged well and a whole different experience than other regions. I do like my malbec's and cabs from Argentinean and Chile...but I challenge someone can find a similar quality of wine like a 1982, 1989, 1990, 2009,2010 Cantermerle. Or at a lower price point, a Lanessan. But again, my palette enjoys a classic old world claret more.

Also, my recommendation on aging the Bordeaux, is also taking into consideration, this is most likely a birth year celebration wine. I would think celebrating a son/daughter's 19th birthday dinner with a bottle of a 19 year old french/bordeaux wine would have a more dramatic flare than a 19 year old Chilean or Argentinan wine.
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May 16, 2005
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Pete_Coach wrote: I really need to question why? Why buy and put it away for many years? Why not buy and drink it??
If it is to build up a cellar then just buy a bunch and drink it as you want.

We are wine drinkers and have quite a selection and it never made any sense or value to have wine in the cellar that I could not or should not drink for 5 to 10 years.
There are many reasons why someone would buy wine and store them away. Some of them being:
- a celebration year wine....birth year of their kids, wedding year,etc...They envision gifting a case of wine made in the year their kid was born when they 19 or 21...or drinking a wine from the year they got marry, during their wedding anniversary for the next 10, 20 , 30 years
- Some wines do develop into a better/different tasting wine when aged, less tannin/alcohol
- trophy/investment purposes, certain wines consistently increase in value over the years, personal story, in 2002/3 I was buying Lafites for $99 USD a bottle, now they are selling in auctions for $700+ a bottle

That's some of the reasons...many more...however, the downside is, especially for the first reason, a lot of people don't have the storage facility to keep these wines for any extended period of time, and they go bad.
Last edited by commie on Aug 4th, 2020 6:19 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 30, 2009
1057 posts
557 upvotes
Richmond Hill
commie wrote: Any worthwhile 2019 wine that can age for 19+ years will not be on store shelves yet. Typically it'll take at least 2-3 years of barrel age before they are bottled and sold to the consumers.
In most cases, Bordeaux red wine is considered the most suited for aging for long time. Its consistent quality across all price ranges and is available to end consumers. There are others like Burgundy that may have higher quality for some of the higher end wine, but its not as consistent across the board.
Like the other poster suggested, Port will age forever, and typically the quality is pretty consistent across the board, but its an acquired taste whether you enjoy drinking port. Some others to consider would be good wines from Rhone (CDP, Hermitage), Barolo, and Brunello Di Montalcino.
I would stay away from Australian or Napa, unless its really high end.

Suggestion, if you are in Ontario, wait till the fall. That is when LCBO will offer the futures for the 2019 bordeaux vintage. You order now, pay a deposit, and in 2022 you pick up the wine when its released and pay the balance.
So far, the critics have generally found 2019 bordeaux to be a very good vintage, and with the global economy the way it is, the futures price on the vintage have been 10-20% lower than what 2018 was. The US already had their first tranche of the 2019 futures starting in May/June this year. Canadians are always behind.

Some bordeaux that would be in your $30 price range with aging potential, and available at LCBO futures:
Cantermerle
Senejac
Labegorce
Barde Haut
Chateau Tour St. Christophe
Capbern
Lafon Rochet
Lilian Laduoys
These are typically in the 30-60 dollar range.
The other challenge for you is, do you have the proper storage to keep the wine in good condition for 19+ years? Wine needs to be stored in a dark, chilled, consistent temp(57-65) range.
Thanks, I will look into those when Fall comes. The second challenge you said is actually a bigger problem. I've never thought of that.. I guess just sticking it in a cabinet / basement for 20 years isn't going to work.. even if I get a wine rack and put them sideways right?
Pete_Coach wrote: I really need to question why? Why buy and put it away for many years? Why not buy and drink it??
If it is to build up a cellar then just buy a bunch and drink it as you want.

We are wine drinkers and have quite a selection and it never made any sense or value to have wine in the cellar that I could not or should not drink for 5 to 10 years.
It's not really for me. I had my first born last year, so I figured it'd be really cool to have a /bottles of wine in their birth year to celebrate.. say when they reach 19, or for when they get married.
thriftshopper wrote: A few considerations (actually about 3) in addition to those mentioned above

1) storage conditions - even o.k. wines will store/age reasonably well if stored well. That means temperatures should never go above 18C (cooler such as 15C) is better. Exposure to higher temperatures will cook the wine or at least cause it to age faster. You end up with something that tastes like unsweetened i.e., fortified sherry.

2) closures. Cork (real - either whole or reconstituted) is permeable and will cause the wine to "age". You have to keep the cork moist (hence why stored wine is usually layed it on its side or even upside down) otherwise it'll dry out. For wines that are stored for decades, corks are even changed. You also run the risk of corked wines - wine spoiled because of naturally-occurring microorganisms in the cork (usual and most apparent symptom is the wine smelling like wet cardboard). Of course, synthetic corks appear to get around this, as do the twist-top/Stelvin closures. It is said (by winemakers) that wine ages minimally with these twist top closures.

3) Tannins. If you want to assess what stores well, a very full-bodied red wine per above is generally a good guide. Even better is tasting. If drunk young, the tannins (makes your mouth pucker) should be heavy. Tannins are natural preservatives found in the skins of dark grapes and also oak wood. They mellow out over time.

If you go to a vineyard, ask the winemaker (especially in smaller wineries). Usually it'll be heavy reds, and high alcohol (>14% ABV). Bordeaux AC and sub-appellation (e.g., Pomerol, St Emilion, Medoc) blends cited above are usually a combination of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot (among others). Cabernet Franc is used too but this wine s a little light. Another good one is Malbec (better known as Cahors AC wine from France, and wines from Argentina). Shiraz/Syrahs (Rhône valley, and also Australia) are also good. Avoid Gamay Noirs (used in Beaujolais nouveau) - a wine to be drunk young and most Pinot Noirs (Burgundy).
Thanks! As the above posters have mentioned , I actually had not thought of storing it in cooler temps. I can't think of anywhere in the house that will be around 15-18c consistently. Buying those wine fridges might seem kind of overkill / I don't have a place to put one of them. yikes.. but if I keep it at room temperature like around 21-22c it would cook the wine making it taste bad

As for the cork issue, I have a wine rack that can fit a few bottles on it's side but then it'll bring me back to the first point.. needing it to be that temperature. So for example if I get a few bottles of those bordeaux, it is recommended I get them recorked?

I guess when things open back up, I can go to some wineries in the falls and ask around as well. I'll also keep an eye on LCBO with the above recommendations.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Sep 30, 2009
1057 posts
557 upvotes
Richmond Hill
commie wrote: There are many reasons why someone would buy wine and store them away. Some of them being:
- a celebration year wine....birth year of their kids, wedding year,etc...They envision gifting a case of wine made in the year their kid was born when they 19 or 21...or drinking a wine from the year they got marry, during their wedding anniversary for the next 10, 20 , 30 years
- Some wines do develop into a better/different tasting wine when aged, less tannin/alcohol
- trophy/investment purposes, certain wines consistently increase in value over the years, personal story, in 2002/3 I was buying Lafites for $99 USD a bottle, now they are selling in auctions for $700+ a bottle

That's some of the reasons...many more...however, the downside is, especially for the first reason, a lot of people don't have the storage facility to keep these wines for any extended period of time, and they go back.
Yep, birth year of my kid last year.. but the more I read.. I'm afraid it might be a lot more complicated than I had thought. Astonished Face
Deal Fanatic
Apr 25, 2006
5974 posts
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commie wrote: There are many reasons why someone would buy wine and store them away. Some of them being:
- a celebration year wine....birth year of their kids, wedding year,etc...They envision gifting a case of wine made in the year their kid was born when they 19 or 21...or drinking a wine from the year they got marry, during their wedding anniversary for the next 10, 20 , 30 years
- Some wines do develop into a better/different tasting wine when aged, less tannin/alcohol
- trophy/investment purposes, certain wines consistently increase in value over the years, personal story, in 2002/3 I was buying Lafites for $99 USD a bottle, now they are selling in auctions for $700+ a bottle

That's some of the reasons...many more...however, the downside is, especially for the first reason, a lot of people don't have the storage facility to keep these wines for any extended period of time, and they go back.
Go back where? Or go bad?

Thanks for the insight
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May 16, 2005
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1xTiMeR wrote: Go back where? Or go bad?

Thanks for the insight
Lol sorry typo. Fixed now, it was suppose to be go bad.
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Just a note re: avoiding wine with cork closures. Had a bottle of Audacity of Thomas G Bright red (2017 vintage cabernet merlot aged in barrels for 14 months so bottled early last year and the earliest?) and it was distinctly corked. Closure was whole cork (as in not reconstituted) This is the first evidently and indisputably corked wine I've had in a long time.
Cream rises to the top. So does scum.

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