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Almost vertical crack in foundation / basement

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  • Oct 31st, 2019 1:37 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Nov 1, 2009
2646 posts
77 upvotes

Almost vertical crack in foundation / basement

Hi guys. There is an "almost" vertical crack in the foundation area of our basement with some water seeping through (pic below). The house itself is about 15 years old. We have some foundation guys coming later this week and next week for quotes. Based on phone calls, at a high level two options:
1) Repair from inside for ~$600-800
2) Repair from outside for ~$1500-2000 (digging soil required)

Pretty much everyone (over phone) has recommended the outside approach. I am sure it's "better", but is it worth the cost? While I will listen to the explanations of the contractors, would love to get personal feedback from fellow RFDers who may have done this in the past. And is it normal for this kind of issue after 15-20 years? Thought foundation issues "usually" occur in the first 5 years or so. Thx.
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15 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 11, 2018
1677 posts
1346 upvotes
Definitely get it fixed from outside. Make sure they provide some sort of WRITTEN warranty. Is it normal? Not really. But shit happens ;)

There could have been a weakness since day one and with the freezing/thawing process it resulted in what is happening now.
All the women I have loved have made my life more complete.
Deal Expert
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Dec 26, 2005
16942 posts
1787 upvotes
Thornhill
I don't think the repair from the outside is a fair price and I'm not sure why the repair from the inside is so expensive. I think it's just an injection of something like Sika Crack Repair:
https://can.sika.com/content/canada/mai ... tions.html

I repaired two floor-to-ceiling cracks in our basement from the outside with manual digging over two weekends. Saturdays were dig out, clean, repair, and Sundays were to back-fill. I also did the Sika Crack Repair from the inside at the same time.

bjl
Last edited by t3359 on Oct 30th, 2019 6:54 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Member
Dec 8, 2009
348 posts
60 upvotes
It’s normal. I tried fixing from outside by myself. I bought the repair kit from Rona. But only lasted a few years. I just live with it. Not a big deal if not finishing the basement
Deal Expert
User avatar
Nov 28, 2016
19657 posts
2656 upvotes
Out west
If a person did the grunt work for this and not the actual repair, how much cheaper would it be. Ill dig dirt for a day to save myself a grand.

Also, any thing like this, stopping it from entering is better than stopping it from exiting.
Last edited by WikkiWikki on Oct 30th, 2019 3:44 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 13, 2004
11359 posts
3105 upvotes
Toronto, Ontario
if you are willing to dig down yourself you could easily fix it yourself. There are MANY videos on youtube on how to repair foundation cracks from the outside.

However fixing from the outside is the best it should last forever if its done properly. If you do it from the inside the water is still finding its way into the the concrete and eventually it will likely find a new hole/crack etc so you will need to fix it form the outside but now your paying twice.
0_o
<_<
>_>
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
16266 posts
17748 upvotes
Oakville
Phoenix3434 wrote: Hi guys. There is an "almost" vertical crack in the foundation area of our basement with some water seeping through (pic below). The house itself is about 15 years old. We have some foundation guys coming later this week and next week for quotes. Based on phone calls, at a high level two options:
1) Repair from inside for ~$600-800
2) Repair from outside for ~$1500-2000 (digging soil required)

Pretty much everyone (over phone) has recommended the outside approach. I am sure it's "better", but is it worth the cost? While I will listen to the explanations of the contractors, would love to get personal feedback from fellow RFDers who may have done this in the past. And is it normal for this kind of issue after 15-20 years? Thought foundation issues "usually" occur in the first 5 years or so. Thx.
I would DIY fix from the outside if you are fit.
As that 15 year old home has a cracking foundation and isn't sealed properly from the outside.
Newbie
Sep 7, 2015
31 posts
16 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
Went through the same thing about 3 years ago. I hired a guy with a mini-excavator from KIJIJI to dig about 15 linear feet down to the footing. Took him about 3 hours and cost me around $400. Patched the crack myself, tar, primer, blue skin membrane, 2 inch styrofoam (not really needed, but what the heck). Filled the trench myself with a shovel (much easier than digging). All in all, probably spent around $650.
Deal Addict
Feb 11, 2018
1677 posts
1346 upvotes
A product often used to fill the crack (preferably from the outside...) is epoxy for concrete. It works very well at preventing water from entering the crack in the wall.
All the women I have loved have made my life more complete.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Mar 10, 2005
9536 posts
3155 upvotes
get a few quotes, if some of the quotes seem unreasonable then get more. from my research a few years ago a crack like you have can be fixed from the inside using Polyurethane Concrete Crack Injection.
Discomfort is your friend
Deal Addict
Feb 11, 2018
1677 posts
1346 upvotes
Here is a good comparison between epoxy and polyurethane. I once used epoxy for a similar repair more than a decade ago ands it is still working.
All the women I have loved have made my life more complete.
Deal Expert
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Dec 26, 2005
16942 posts
1787 upvotes
Thornhill
db9514022 wrote: Went through the same thing about 3 years ago. I hired a guy with a mini-excavator from KIJIJI to dig about 15 linear feet down to the footing. Took him about 3 hours and cost me around $400. Patched the crack myself, tar, primer, blue skin membrane, 2 inch styrofoam (not really needed, but what the heck). Filled the trench myself with a shovel (much easier than digging). All in all, probably spent around $650.
Aside from the excavator, this is basically what I did. The Sika crack repair, self bonding concrete patch up, primer, then Bluskin.

bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
Deal Expert
User avatar
Dec 26, 2005
16942 posts
1787 upvotes
Thornhill
If you’re doing the repair yourself, be aware that the soil around the excavated area may collapse.

bjl
What we do in life echoes in Eternity... and in Google cache.
RFD discounts for Schluter products
Deal Addict
Dec 25, 2007
1154 posts
591 upvotes
GTA
It needs to be done from the outside and drainage needs to be improved
Jr. Member
Oct 19, 2010
154 posts
43 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
I had a similar repair a few years ago. I dug a hole myself and paid someone $350 who had the tools and knowledge to fix the crack from the outside. I had to fix it in winter so the soil was very wet and hard to dig but our basement is finished so couldn't risk anymore damage.
Deal Addict
Feb 11, 2018
1677 posts
1346 upvotes
@Phoenix3434 The proper way is to fix it from outside. That being said, if I were in your shoes I would first try the following as all it would cost me is time and less than $50 for the epoxy.

I would put my heat gun about two inches from the wall and slowly move up and down over the crack in order to see if I can dry it up. If I can dry it up I would then find out how long before it is wet again. If the crack could remain dry for a good 5 hours I would use epoxy for concrete to seal the crack. If the crack would remain dry for, say, only one hour, then I would use the polyurethane.

Your probability of success is greater with the epoxy than with the polyurethane.

The bottom line is it is worth a shot since the cost and the trouble involved is so small. It could last a few years, or it could last a very long time.
All the women I have loved have made my life more complete.

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