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[Amazon.ca] ($25.27) Sharp Pebble Premium Whetstone Sharpening Stone 2 Side Grit 400/1000 w/Flattening Stone & Rubber Base

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  • Nov 3rd, 2020 11:28 pm
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[Amazon.ca] ($25.27) Sharp Pebble Premium Whetstone Sharpening Stone 2 Side Grit 400/1000 w/Flattening Stone & Rubber Base

Sharp Pebble Premium Whetstone Sharpening Stone 2 Side Grit 400/1000-Whetstone Knife Sharpener with Flattening Stone & NonSlip Rubber Base

Lowest historical price.. Usually around 37.
Last edited by S14_Raven on Nov 3rd, 2020 7:38 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Price in title please :)
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Interesting... The one I bought has 1000/6000 grit sides. For weekly sharpening all I need is 30s with the 6000 side. I am no expert, just sharing my experience. Once the wife made a nick in the blade and it took me quite a while to sand enough material with the 1000 grit side to smoothen it. Perhaps that's what the rougher stones are for...

One I have:
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B0758938JB

Something that came up in recommendations:
https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07M98PDCX
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rokask wrote: Once the wife made a nick in the blade and it took me quite a while to sand enough material with the 1000 grit side to smoothen it. Perhaps that's what the rougher stones are for...
you'll get a hundred different views on this, but mine is 400 then 1000 then strop
then your upkeep will be 1000 and strop
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raskal wrote: you'll get a hundred different views on this, but mine is 400 then 1000 then strop
then your upkeep will be 1000 and strop
I stroke my knife on 600 holding the stone like a honing steel. Then straight to the cutting board.
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Jan 26, 2005
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Is there any reason this is better than an aliexpress whetstone for like $5?
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For budget waterstones I always recommend king 1k/6k combo. Last I checked its around $50 on amazoink
There are different grit systems. The pebble probably uses murican grit while king uses JIS system. If the pebble uses JIS then 400 is super aggressive. Not recommend unless you are a professional sharpener or know what you are doing.

King is a very well reputed brand. I have a 1.2k stone myself. I believe THE murray carter also uses kings stones at least he did, not sure right now.
A good water stone would probably last a home cook a life time unless you drop it. (Dropped my $70 stone and it cracked into 2 RIP)

Do note the included "flattening stone" wont do jack. To flatten a water stone you need something way bigger and completely flat. I use a metal lapping plate that is machined to be flat AF. Other options is to use sand paper on a glass surface. The ghetto way that I heard is to rub your water stone on flat pavement....
Last edited by mewko1502 on Nov 3rd, 2020 7:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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eband00 wrote: This any good?
This is great for ppl who just want a sharp knife and aren't ocd about shaving their face with their kitchen knife (using 6000 grit).

400/1000 is perfect especially for ppl who are new to wetstone sharpening. The 400 grit will get a knife sharp relatively quickly and the 1000 will give you a decent enough polish.

This vid makes perfect sense for beginners

Last edited by gr8dlr on Nov 3rd, 2020 6:55 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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rokask wrote: Interesting... The one I bought has 1000/6000 grit sides. For weekly sharpening all I need is 30s with the 6000 side. I am no expert, just sharing my experience. Once the wife made a nick in the blade and it took me quite a while to sand enough material with the 1000 grit side to smoothen it. Perhaps that's what the rougher stones are for...

One I have:
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/product/B0758938JB

Something that came up in recommendations:
https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07M98PDCX
Probably different grit systems. There is murican and JIS. If it's 400 JIS then its really aggressive. 400JIS is usually for repairs.

You can look at it this way. lower grit = more material loss = less strokes = faster
The less stokes you do the more consistent your angle is.
That being said 1 small mistake at a super low grit means a huge mistake.

Professional sharpeners will use lower grits at first because this reason. More consistent and speed.
For most people around 1k to reestablish an edge and anything above to polish/refine the edge is recommended.

If there is still an edge but it just needs a touch up the "best" way is to strop your knife on a high grit stone. This is the preferred way compared to using a honing rod. I guess thats what you been doing.
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gr8dlr wrote: This is great for ppl who just want a sharp knife and aren't ocd about shaving their face with their kitchen knife (using 6000 grit).

400/1000 is perfect especially for ppl who are new to wetstone sharpening. The 400 grit will get a knife sharp relatively quickly and the 1000 will give you a decent enough polish.

This vid makes perfect sense for beginners

Meh 6k aint that high. My chef goes to 8k
From my experience stopping at 1.2k makes my knives feel like saw blades. Up to 6k it feels like...a knife? Goes through food smoothly in one stroke. Even at 6k your knife wont be "too" polished or slippery. I have 0 problems slicing super ripe tomatoes paper thin or cutting meat.
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mewko1502 wrote: Probably different grit systems. There is murican and JIS. If it's 400 JIS then its really aggressive. 400JIS is usually for repairs.

You can look at it this way. lower grit = more material loss = less strokes = faster
The less stokes you do the more consistent your angle is.
That being said 1 small mistake at a super low grit means a huge mistake.

Professional sharpeners will use lower grits at first because this reason. More consistent and speed.
For most people around 1k to reestablish an edge and anything above to polish/refine the edge is recommended.

If there is still an edge but it just needs a touch up the "best" way is to strop your knife on a high grit stone. This is the preferred way compared to using a honing rod. I guess thats what you been doing.
If you're a beginner, you're not likely to get satisfactory results because using a 1000 grit stone for a somewhat dull knife... it's going to take way too long to get decent burr.

This is why it's a mistake for a BEGINNER to start with a 1000/6000 grit stone. For you ppl who are experienced and if the knife is pretty much sharp, 1000/6000 is fine. Most ppl do not slice paper thin tomato slices... They eat to cut onions, garlic, veggies, meat to eat.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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gr8dlr wrote: If you're a beginner, you're not likely to get satisfactory results because using a 1000 grit stone for a somewhat dull knife... it's going to take way too long to get decent burr.

This is why it's a mistake for a BEGINNER to start with a 1000/6000 grit stone. For you ppl who are experienced and if the knife is pretty much sharp, 1000/6000 is fine. Most ppl do not slice paper thin tomato slices... They eat to cut onions, garlic, veggies, meat to eat.
If you're a beginner using a 400 grit stone 1 mistake will completely change the geometry/angle of the knife. Professional sharpeners tend to use 400 or even 200 JIS only to repair chips/tipped knives or if they really want to speed things up. On the other hand using a 1000 grit stone may take longer but is wayyyyyyyyyy more forgiving. Would also like to point out that grits are not the only factor on cutting speed. Some brands simply cut faster at the expense of stone life vice versa.

The reason I brought up paper thin tomatoes is because lots of ppl will say "anything above "insert-grit-size-here" will overpolish your knife, you will have a hard time slicing tomatoes or meat" That is simply not true. If a knife is able to cut a tomato paper thin it will obviously be able to cut onions, garlic, veggies and meat.....................
Not telling EVERYONE to sharpen their knives to 6k grit. Just pointing out that saying 6k is too much is just plain wrong.

Grant from chefsteps also recommends 1k-1.5k jis as the first stone you start on if your knife is just dull and doesn't require any repairing.
https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/ho ... en-a-knife
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mewko1502 wrote: If you're a beginner using a 400 grit stone 1 mistake will completely change the geometry/angle of the knife. Professional sharpeners tend to use 400 or even 200 JIS only to repair chips/tipped knives or if they really want to speed things up. On the other hand using a 1000 grit stone may take longer but is wayyyyyyyyyy more forgiving. Would also like to point out that grits are not the only factor on cutting speed. Some brands simply cut faster at the expense of stone life vice versa.

The reason I brought up paper thin tomatoes is because lots of ppl will say "anything above "insert-grit-size-here" will overpolish your knife, you will have a hard time slicing tomatoes or meat" That is simply not true. If a knife is able to cut a tomato paper thin it will obviously be able to cut onions, garlic, veggies and meat.....................
Not telling EVERYONE to sharpen their knives to 6k grit. Just pointing out that saying 6k is too much is just plain wrong.

Grant from chefsteps also recommends 1k-1.5k jis as the first stone you start on if your knife is just dull and doesn't require any repairing.
https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/ho ... en-a-knife
We can agree to disagree, I just think if you ask a beginner to spend 30 min wetstoning a dull knife (never been sharpened) on 1000 grit to apex... It's not going to go well.
We're all bozos on the bus until we find a way to express ourselves...

Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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gr8dlr wrote: We can agree to disagree, I just think if you ask a beginner to spend 30 min wetstoning a dull knife (never been sharpened) on 1000 grit to apex... It's not going to go well.
I can see where you are coming from. That being said I think most beginners would rather use more time than to probably most likely take off a lot more material in the best case and in the worst completely change the geometry/shape/angle.

Have a great night/day!

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