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[Amazon.ca] 32-Core / 64-Thread AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX $1,299.99

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  • Jun 1st, 2021 1:27 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Feb 6, 2016
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[Amazon.ca] 32-Core / 64-Thread AMD Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX $1,299.99

AMD YD299XAZAFWOF Ryzen Threadripper 2990WX Processor

On sale at it's lowest price per 3C.

Cheaper than 16 and 24 core Threadrippers of the same generation
Last edited by TomRFD on May 31st, 2021 10:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: added price to title
13 replies
Deal Guru
Apr 17, 2003
10410 posts
6921 upvotes
2990WX is slow for the price...unless you need the TR specifically for max memory and / or PCI-E lanes.
[OP]
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Feb 6, 2016
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chatbox wrote: 2990WX is slow for the price...unless you need the TR specifically for max memory and / or PCI-E lanes.
What would be your suggestion if I'm looking for most number of cores at similar price point? I will be using it for CPU intensive workloads that focuses more on parallel jobs. The only reason stopping me to buy this at this point is the high cost of compatible motherboards.
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Feb 11, 2005
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Tr4Q3r wrote: What would be your suggestion if I'm looking for most number of cores at similar price point? I will be using it for CPU intensive workloads that focuses more on parallel jobs. The only reason stopping me to buy this at this point is the high cost of compatible motherboards.
Even with heavily multi-threaded loads, the higher IPC of the newer CPUs can offset the lower core count. Using Cinebench R20 multi-threaded benchmarks as an example, I'm seeing the 2990wx score around 13k, while the 5950x gets 10k (or 11k with PBO), around the same performance per dollar but on a less expensive platform. Considering there's no upgrade path for either, if you need something today you'd probably be better off with the 5950x until TR 5000 series are released, at which point reselling the 5950x would be easier than finding a buyer for the 2990wx.
Deal Guru
Apr 17, 2003
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https://www.notebookcheck.net/16-core-R ... 662.0.html

Go with the newer platform. As Kwirky said, potentially better resale value. You have parallel workload in mind, but also note the improved IPC...i.e. it'll benefit you in single thread tasks too (i.e. better readiness for potentially different type of load, not just a one trick pony).
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Nov 7, 2003
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Kwirky wrote: Even with heavily multi-threaded loads, the higher IPC of the newer CPUs can offset the lower core count. Using Cinebench R20 multi-threaded benchmarks as an example, I'm seeing the 2990wx score around 13k, while the 5950x gets 10k (or 11k with PBO), around the same performance per dollar but on a less expensive platform. Considering there's no upgrade path for either, if you need something today you'd probably be better off with the 5950x until TR 5000 series are released, at which point reselling the 5950x would be easier than finding a buyer for the 2990wx.
The 2990wx and 5950x have no upgrade paths? I'm guessing the TR processors uses a different kind of motherboard? $1300 doesn't seem too bad for 32 cores and 64 threads. I was interested until I read your comment.
Member
Jun 9, 2019
401 posts
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Kwirky wrote: Even with heavily multi-threaded loads, the higher IPC of the newer CPUs can offset the lower core count. Using Cinebench R20 multi-threaded benchmarks as an example, I'm seeing the 2990wx score around 13k, while the 5950x gets 10k (or 11k with PBO), around the same performance per dollar but on a less expensive platform. Considering there's no upgrade path for either, if you need something today you'd probably be better off with the 5950x until TR 5000 series are released, at which point reselling the 5950x would be easier than finding a buyer for the 2990wx.
This is still a significant difference to people who legitimately need a powerful CPU for multi threaded workloads. It adds up if you're running workloads that are hours upon hours in length.
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Jun 20, 2020
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Sgt_Strider wrote: The 2990wx and 5950x have no upgrade paths? I'm guessing the TR processors uses a different kind of motherboard? $1300 doesn't seem too bad for 32 cores and 64 threads. I was interested until I read your comment.
Socket TR4, supporting its first- and second-generation Zen-based Ryzen Threadripper desktop processors, launched on August 10, 2017. It was succeeded by Socket sTRX4 for the third generation of Ryzen Threadripper processors.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_TR4

Socket sTRX4, supports Zen 2-based Castle Peak Ryzen Threadripper desktop processors, launched on November 25, 2019.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Socket_sTRX4


5950x AM4 socket is coming to the end of its life cycle

AMD's AM5 Leaks Point Towards Major Changes for Ryzen
Newbie
Oct 9, 2014
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Vancouver
Better just go with newest Threadripper Pro line
Deal Addict
Apr 4, 2017
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is this any good with Chia or Monero mining or wait until something better comes along?
Deal Guru
Apr 17, 2003
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...The 5950X supposed to have a lower power consumption as well (gauging roughtly from TDP spec)...105W vs 250W.
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Jan 25, 2004
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Oomani wrote: This is still a significant difference to people who legitimately need a powerful CPU for multi threaded workloads. It adds up if you're running workloads that are hours upon hours in length.
Part of the issue with chips like this is the armchair quarterbacks come out with their opinions, without truly understanding the intended workloads of these chips.
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Apr 17, 2003
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Konowl wrote: Part of the issue with chips like this is the armchair quarterbacks come out with their opinions, without truly understanding the intended workloads of these chips.
Puget Systems has fairly decent reviews over the years when it comes to workstation workloads: https://www.pugetsystems.com/labs/artic ... ndup-1962/

(Not to be considered as a bible...but a data point)

Another benchmark: https://www.vfxarabia.co/post/houdini-b ... ed-updated

Essentially, if one were to be completely accurate in suggesting / deciding which platform to go with (if performance is the only consideration), then there's nothing better than running the specific workload side by side for comparison, in the intended environment and architecture (if it relies on other components on the network).
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chatbox wrote: Essentially, if one were to be completely accurate in suggesting / deciding which platform to go with (if performance is the only consideration), then there's nothing better than running the specific workload side by side for comparison, in the intended environment and architecture (if it relies on other components on the network).
Correct.

Also, the threadripper chips will contain feature sets that haven't even been touched upon by anyone in this thread yet that are outside of the scope of CPU related.

Anyways, at the end of the day, they are more of a specialized chip for a more specific workload.

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