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AmazonBasics AA Rechargeable Batteries (16-Pack) - 22.67 or lower with S&S

  • Last Updated:
  • Jan 14th, 2022 2:48 pm
27 replies
Newbie
Dec 14, 2020
41 posts
63 upvotes
These batteries are made in China now and no longer the eneloop rewrap.

I'd suggest going to ikea and buying the ikea ladda batteries. They are rewraps of eneloop that are made in Japan.

https://eneloop101.com/batteries/rewrapped-batteries/

For those that don't know what Eneloop batteries are. They are made by Panasonic and considered to be the best rechargeable batteries and used in photography quite a bit.
Deal Addict
Sep 10, 2010
2991 posts
1389 upvotes
Ottawa
I love rechargeables, but I think one problem I've discovered is the 1.2V vs the 1.5V of alkaline batteries. My devices will report low battery, when there is sometimes 1/3 or or more juice left in the battery, but it just can't put out that 1.2V anymore.
Member
Aug 18, 2019
341 posts
275 upvotes
EBL is so much better than this now made in china Amazon basics
~ 👍teslanaire2bitcoinaireButStillCheapLurking@RFDForDeals✌️~
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 10, 2006
2627 posts
3119 upvotes
Toronto
Why would anyone need S&S for rechargeable batteries? I know RFDers will cancel right away but it seems an odd option to offer for a product designed to replace disposables Thinking Face
Jr. Member
Jul 14, 2016
111 posts
82 upvotes
toronto_slim wrote: Why would anyone need S&S for rechargeable batteries? I know RFDers will cancel right away but it seems an odd option to offer for a product designed to replace disposables Thinking Face
Came here to ask the same question. Is there idiots that subscribe to these thinking they're disposable? They're "pre charged" and I mean some people are so clueless it's got to happen on a somewhat regular basis. I hope not for humanity's sake but some people man...
moto g 5g, on LineageOS (in an otterbox case because gorilla glass is too much of a luxury for motorola) moto g8 power, on public mobile's 120$ with tax 12GB plan/3 mths
Deal Guru
Mar 1, 2002
10441 posts
7499 upvotes
Toronto
eugene188 wrote: I love rechargeables, but I think one problem I've discovered is the 1.2V vs the 1.5V of alkaline batteries. My devices will report low battery, when there is sometimes 1/3 or or more juice left in the battery, but it just can't put out that 1.2V anymore.
Someone actually debunked that, voltage shouldn’t be an issue: https://eznec.com/Amateur/1.5_vs_1.2_Volt_Batteries.pdf

I still use alkaline for some low drain devices where I might leave them in for months. But for high drain nimh all the way.
Deal Expert
Jan 7, 2002
24382 posts
20475 upvotes
Waterloo, ON
Angultra wrote: Someone actually debunked that, voltage shouldn’t be an issue: https://eznec.com/Amateur/1.5_vs_1.2_Volt_Batteries.pdf
Two different issues which the author of the linked article even acknowledges in his first conclusion, " 1. You can use “1.2 volt” NiMH cells in devices which are properly designed to use “1.5 volt” alkaline cells. "

This is the issue that @eugene188 reports. Some devices won't work or won't work well on NiMH rechargeables because of this. I also have some devices like that. Yet the vast majority of stuff works just fine. I also wouldn't use NiMH in critical safety-related devices like smoke/CO detectors even if they seem to work.

I fully agree that if the device works it will work longer on a NiMH than on an alkaline. I have genuine Eneloops, AmazonBasics rewraps and the newer Chinese-made AmazonBasics. I haven't done any hard measurements, but subjectively all three seem to last about as long.

Maybe the genuine article will sustain more recharges and/or demonstrate higher mAh life on a charge. That may be material to a pro whose job depends on it. But I doubt most casual users will notice.
I still use alkaline for some low drain devices where I might leave them in for months. But for high drain nimh all the way.
I use NiMH even in low drain applications like remote controls. NiMH have very low self-discharge so they'll last a year or more in that sort of application. Alkalines may last even longer but it's hardly a big deal to put in a fresh batch of NiMHs every year or more, especially when you can get the AmazonBasics for as low as a buck a pop. Even in this sort of application rechargeables will be cheaper after only a few cycles.
veni, vidi, Visa
Member
Nov 22, 2013
238 posts
226 upvotes
Any recommendations out there for an affordable charger? I’m looking for something with individual charging slots, but are there any other features I can’t live without?
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7632 posts
7722 upvotes
Angultra wrote: Someone actually debunked that, voltage shouldn’t be an issue: https://eznec.com/Amateur/1.5_vs_1.2_Volt_Batteries.pdf
Actually, if you read that article:

'You can use “1.2 volt” NiMH cells in devices which are properly designed to use “1.5 volt”
alkaline cells. '

And that's the problem, there are a rather high number of devices out there I've seen that aren't properly designed.

That said, for the vast majority of cases device will work fine with rechargeable.
Angultra wrote: I still use alkaline for some low drain devices where I might leave them in for months. But for high drain nimh all the way.
Frankly, you shouldn't use alkaline batteries at all anymore.

These low self drain nimh batteries removed the last reason to buy alkaline: they have slow self drain. I have a set in some photography gear (flashes and remote triggers) that I haven't used much due to the pandemic, and the cells still had a decent charge on them when I went to use them almost a year later.

Even in things like remotes they are a good choice.

And, of course, the BEST reason to use these over alkaline, other than the environmental reason of course, is they don't leak! Say goodbye to devices destroyed by leaking batteries.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7632 posts
7722 upvotes
Randalpink73 wrote: Any recommendations out there for an affordable charger? I’m looking for something with individual charging slots, but are there any other features I can’t live without?
I use a unit like this one:
https://www.amazon.ca/Li-ion-Rechargeab ... 80-9966021

The per cell charge indication is important. The one I have is actually 4 bay, but can't find it anymore.
Deal Fanatic
May 25, 2009
6700 posts
3049 upvotes
Toronto
toronto_slim wrote: Why would anyone need S&S for rechargeable batteries? I know RFDers will cancel right away but it seems an odd option to offer for a product designed to replace disposables Thinking Face
If you are Amazon, why would you NOT offer this??
Sr. Member
Feb 4, 2017
992 posts
943 upvotes
Toronto
Lowfiguy8 wrote: These batteries are made in China now and no longer the eneloop rewrap.

I'd suggest going to ikea and buying the ikea ladda batteries. They are rewraps of eneloop that are made in Japan.

https://eneloop101.com/batteries/rewrapped-batteries/

For those that don't know what Eneloop batteries are. They are made by Panasonic and considered to be the best rechargeable batteries and used in photography quite a bit.
Very useful information. I have some Duraloops from probably 10 yrs ago and need replacing. Going to grab some "Ikealoops" from Ikea.
Deal Guru
Mar 1, 2002
10441 posts
7499 upvotes
Toronto
repatch wrote: Actually, if you read that article:

'You can use “1.2 volt” NiMH cells in devices which are properly designed to use “1.5 volt”
alkaline cells. '

And that's the problem, there are a rather high number of devices out there I've seen that aren't properly designed.

That said, for the vast majority of cases device will work fine with rechargeable.



Frankly, you shouldn't use alkaline batteries at all anymore.

These low self drain nimh batteries removed the last reason to buy alkaline: they have slow self drain. I have a set in some photography gear (flashes and remote triggers) that I haven't used much due to the pandemic, and the cells still had a decent charge on them when I went to use them almost a year later.

Even in things like remotes they are a good choice.

And, of course, the BEST reason to use these over alkaline, other than the environmental reason of course, is they don't leak! Say goodbye to devices destroyed by leaking batteries.
In his tests, voltage only starts of slightly higher and within 5 minutes the alkalines drop below Nimh. But he used eneloops so I suppose a cheaper Chinese Nimh would have a worse curve, or be victim of high shelf drain.

Good point on the leaking, I only use alkalines for clocks (several year life) and a marathon mouse which lasts over a year. Also have a few for when I gift / sell an item and want to include batteries. Feels like I should include a charger with Nimh, but budget doesn't always allow. My supply is often replenished with alkalines that come with new items.
Deal Fanatic
Mar 5, 2007
7632 posts
7722 upvotes
Angultra wrote: In his tests, voltage only starts of slightly higher and within 5 minutes the alkalines drop below Nimh. But he used eneloops so I suppose a cheaper Chinese Nimh would have a worse curve, or be victim of high shelf drain.

Good point on the leaking, I only use alkalines for clocks (several year life) and a marathon mouse which lasts over a year. Also have a few for when I gift / sell an item and want to include batteries. Feels like I should include a charger with Nimh, but budget doesn't always allow. My supply is often replenished with alkalines that come with new items.
Note that the internal impedance of a battery matters here, alot. For a certain drain profile you might have the case he has, for another it might be completely different, and that's all for constant drain. Many devices can have radically different current demands during use. For example, a digital camera will use a certain higher amount of current when turning on (while moving it's lens), go down to a lower level, and then ramp if the flash is enabled and needs to be charged.
Member
Jun 14, 2011
307 posts
270 upvotes
Toronto
I bought 2 16-packs of these for $21.60 each last time they had a prime day. They're horrible batteries. They're slightly larger than they should be which makes them hard to get in and out of devices, and the bump on the positive terminal is shorter than it should be; I have some devices where the battery doesn't actually make contact inside because that bump is too short to reach. I am guessing it's a poor quality electrolyte so they use the largest possible volume to make sure the capacity isn't too low. The physical build quality is also very poor, and they take a lot of damage trying to pry them out of devices they're jammed in because they're too large.

There are many better choices in this price range, and even eneloops at full price are better than regretting this purchase every time you need a battery.
Deal Expert
Jan 7, 2002
24382 posts
20475 upvotes
Waterloo, ON
Oracle1729 wrote: I bought 2 16-packs of these for $21.60 each last time they had a prime day. They're horrible batteries. They're slightly larger than they should be which makes them hard to get in and out of devices, and the bump on the positive terminal is shorter than it should be; I have some devices where the battery doesn't actually make contact inside because that bump is too short to reach. I am guessing it's a poor quality electrolyte so they use the largest possible volume to make sure the capacity isn't too low. The physical build quality is also very poor, and they take a lot of damage trying to pry them out of devices they're jammed in because they're too large.

There are many better choices in this price range, and even eneloops at full price are better than regretting this purchase every time you need a battery.
I just measured some AAA (a) Eneloops, (b) Duraloops, (c) AmazonBasics white and (d) AmazonBasics green. All four have a diameter of 10mm and a length (including tip) of 44mm. The first three are all made in Japan. The fourth one is made in Malaysia.

Perhaps there's also an AmazonBasics that's made in China but I don't have any.

P.S. I also measured several regular NiMH rechargeables, i.e. not low self-dischjarge, and their dimensions are identical.
veni, vidi, Visa
Newbie
Aug 15, 2016
85 posts
115 upvotes
Lowfiguy8 wrote: These batteries are made in China now and no longer the eneloop rewrap.

I'd suggest going to ikea and buying the ikea ladda batteries. They are rewraps of eneloop that are made in Japan.

https://eneloop101.com/batteries/rewrapped-batteries/

For those that don't know what Eneloop batteries are. They are made by Panasonic and considered to be the best rechargeable batteries and used in photography quite a bit.
The problem with Eneloop batteries is that I find them fairly low in capacity. Either buy Eneloop Pro, but they can be crazy expensive; or get something like the Duracell rechargeable. It was shown to be right up there in quality:
Deal Guru
Mar 1, 2002
10441 posts
7499 upvotes
Toronto
matus201 wrote: The problem with Eneloop batteries is that I find them fairly low in capacity. Either buy Eneloop Pro, but they can be crazy expensive; or get something like the Duracell rechargeable. It was shown to be right up there in quality:
Fyi the Amazon ones he tested were the old MIJ ones, all are MIC now.

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