Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon Canada] Citizen Eco Drive ProMaster Diver $178.12

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 23rd, 2018 8:12 pm
Newbie
Jun 30, 2017
65 posts
22 upvotes
Fogest wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 6:14 pm
Do you scuba dive? Because it really doesn't sound like you do. Because I do, and I do it a lot. And no one I have ever seen from recreational to technical would dive with this. There is no reason to. If you want a backup dive computer, you would not use this either, you would use a second dive computer. Because without your dive history/logs a device that purely says depth is completely useless.

I don't care if this is rated for 200m or not. The majority of divers are recreational and wouldn't even go past 60m. It's really just to sound fancy. No one wants to dive with something extra on, especially at this price point that could end up getting hit off, or broken. There is just no point.

Since I am apparently an idiot why don't you please disprove both my word, the word of tons of divers, and the word of the product description from the manufacturer and tell me why this would be a good watch for scuba diving?
You're an idiot because you're trying to compare a traditional watch to a **** computer. Stop bitching about it if you aren't buying the watch because clearly you have no care for traditional watches.
Member
Jul 31, 2008
302 posts
128 upvotes
Markham
Fogest wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 6:28 pm
But lots of watches have a high depth rating, I just don't see what it being a "dive watch" matters or why it is advertised as such?
Marketing. It goes well with a Canada Goose jacket that only goes from car to subway. :-)

I do buy dive watches though for the following reasons:
o Usually aesthetically nice (clean face, nice lines).
o Usually a nice size (not hideously over or under sized for my manly wrist).
o I actually use the bezel.
o Durability for swimming, boating, fishing, etc.

Oh yeah, I admire your patience after being called an idiot after demonstrating your knowledge and practicality. :-)
Jr. Member
User avatar
Aug 15, 2017
132 posts
37 upvotes
Ontario
mrpricematch wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 6:45 pm
It's just marketing man. You gotta let it go.
That's how they market "diver" watches. No one that actually dives would use this in a functional sense as pointed out several times already.

It doesn't take away that it's a fair price for an eco drive.
mdl.tor wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 6:48 pm
Marketing. It goes well with a Canada Goose jacket that only goes from car to subway. :-)

I do buy dive watches though for the following reasons:
o Usually aesthetically nice (clean face, nice lines).
o Usually a nice size (not hideously over or under sized for my manly wrist).
o I actually use the bezel.
o Durability for swimming, boating, fishing, etc.

Oh yeah, I admire your patience after being called an idiot after demonstrating your knowledge and practicality. :-)

The reasons outlined make sense on why you'd get them and I appreciate your constructive reply! I could definitely see them being a bit more durable and that being a decent selling point. You mentioned using them swimming, how well do these kinds of watches stand up to chlorinated water? Does it ruin anything on the watch at all?
Member
Sep 9, 2003
481 posts
Vancouver
Fogest wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 6:28 pm
But lots of watches have a high depth rating, I just don't see what it being a "dive watch" matters or why it is advertised as such?
Depth ratings are actually misleading. Watches are tested based on pressure (which is why you sometimes see an "atm" rating) and not actual submersion at the specified depth. There was a table I saw a while back that equates depth ratings with day to day activities such as splashes from washing your hand, submersion under a tap, spray by a hose etc. In short, the higher the rating, the higher chance the watch will RESIST (notice that watches will never say waterproof) a high pressure jet of water.

A true diver's watch is ISO 6425 certified which involves standardized testing with one standout being salt water immersion. While it is no longer useful for modern diving standards, it still has practical merits. Some say it's marketing, some call it peace of mind.. but I definitely wouldn't wear a non-diver's watch at the beach.
Last edited by Tsuioku on Jun 19th, 2018 7:04 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Member
Jul 31, 2008
302 posts
128 upvotes
Markham
Fogest wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 6:54 pm
The reasons outlined make sense on why you'd get them and I appreciate your constructive reply! I could definitely see them being a bit more durable and that being a decent selling point. You mentioned using them swimming, how well do these kinds of watches stand up to chlorinated water? Does it ruin anything on the watch at all?
No idea. I am a real man and only go into fresh or salt water (real reason: I do not like chlorine and public pools, I am more worried about the pee than the chlorine!).

You should buy the cheap Casio dive watch (hits 40 bucks every so often), get a strap that reflects your inner self, and set yourself free.
Nothing is better at forming an opinion than experience! :-)
Jr. Member
User avatar
Aug 15, 2017
132 posts
37 upvotes
Ontario
mdl.tor wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 7:02 pm
No idea. I am a real man and only go into fresh or salt water (real reason: I do not like chlorine and public pools, I am more worried about the pee than the chlorine!).

You should buy the cheap Casio dive watch (hits 40 bucks every so often), get a strap that reflects your inner self, and set yourself free.
Nothing is better at forming an opinion than experience! :-)
With the field I am in and the hobbys I have I definitely typically go for cheap watches or smart watches. I currently actually do have a cheaper Timex watch. I beat them up too much that I'd be afraid to get a fancier watch. Whether it be hitting it on doors, getting it wet, it pushing against or rubbing against random objects, my watches definitely take quite the beating. I find the ones that are in a cheaper price range seem to actually fair decently and I don't have to worry about scuffing the watch or breaking it.
Newbie
User avatar
May 27, 2007
6 posts
Solar powered watches still have batteries. Typically more expensive rechargeable batteries. My personal experience is that the batteries would last about 7 to 10 years. Symptoms: slow down over night, or complete reset for digital ones. The reason is obvious, batteries can't hold the charge. I really wish they use capacitors instead of batteries.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Sep 15, 2015
714 posts
625 upvotes
Abbotsford
But citizen batteries are guaranteed for life (as long as your the original owner)
So beats any mechanical watch hands down
Sr. Member
User avatar
Sep 15, 2015
714 posts
625 upvotes
Abbotsford
Tsuioku wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 7:00 pm
Depth ratings are actually misleading. Watches are tested based on pressure (which is why you sometimes see an "atm" rating) and not actual submersion at the specified depth. There was a table I saw a while back that equates depth ratings with day to day activities such as splashes from washing your hand, submersion under a tap, spray by a hose etc. In short, the higher the rating, the higher chance the watch will RESIST (notice that watches will never say waterproof) a high pressure jet of water.

A true diver's watch is ISO 6425 certified which involves standardized testing with one standout being salt water immersion. While it is no longer useful for modern diving standards, it still has practical merits. Some say it's marketing, some call it peace of mind.. but I definitely wouldn't wear a non-diver's watch at the beach.
I wore a titanium citizen eco drive for 8 years, never took it off. Snorkeling, swimming, hot pools etc etc etc etc. Never missed a beat. Still going strong 10 years later. 100m wr.
Watches are built so over spec its not funny. Anything 200m wr will not fail from submersion, as long as it has been sealed correctly
Member
Sep 9, 2003
481 posts
Vancouver
DanielM491 wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 8:49 pm
I wore a titanium citizen eco drive for 8 years, never took it off. Snorkeling, swimming, hot pools etc etc etc etc. Never missed a beat. Still going strong 10 years later. 100m wr.
Watches are built so over spec its not funny. Anything 200m wr will not fail from submersion, as long as it has been sealed correctly
How do we know it's sealed correctly and still sealed over time? Buying a name brand or buying things that are certified decreases the chance of failure from manufacturing. Not every buyer however is knowledgeable on how to maintain their watch.

It's actually great that you never took off your watch.. now you're regularly washing the watch, removing all the salt and mineral deposits that cause corrosion. How many people do you know regularly rinses off their watch? Now imagine people that live in hot climates and sweat a lot? Corrosion from the back of the watch is a common cause of failure.

Back to Diver's certified watches, manufacturers will tend to use more corrosion resistant materials which buys you more time for you to inadvertently rinse off those deposits. I have a pretty crazy track record of failures including a couple watches so I try to play things safe.
Last edited by Tsuioku on Jun 20th, 2018 12:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
Member
Jul 31, 2008
302 posts
128 upvotes
Markham
Fogest wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 7:34 pm
With the field I am in and the hobbys I have I definitely typically go for cheap watches or smart watches. I currently actually do have a cheaper Timex watch. I beat them up too much that I'd be afraid to get a fancier watch. Whether it be hitting it on doors, getting it wet, it pushing against or rubbing against random objects, my watches definitely take quite the beating. I find the ones that are in a cheaper price range seem to actually fair decently and I don't have to worry about scuffing the watch or breaking it.
I collect only cheap watches for the reasons you mention. I do not want something so fancy I am afraid to use it.
I regret not buying the Seiko Presage limited edition though. :-(

On the watch scale, I consider < 200 cheap (and for others, it may be < 1000 :-).
The Casio divers and their path finder watches are all excellent.

I am not a fan of smart watches due to battery life, usually lousy displays, and I do not need my watch to become a ball and chain to my phone and people contacting me. I carry a dedicated GPS for the same reasons.
Jr. Member
User avatar
Aug 15, 2017
132 posts
37 upvotes
Ontario
mdl.tor wrote:
Jun 19th, 2018 11:38 pm
I collect only cheap watches for the reasons you mention. I do not want something so fancy I am afraid to use it.
I regret not buying the Seiko Presage limited edition though. :-(

On the watch scale, I consider < 200 cheap (and for others, it may be < 1000 :-).
The Casio divers and their path finder watches are all excellent.

I am not a fan of smart watches due to battery life, usually lousy displays, and I do not need my watch to become a ball and chain to my phone and people contacting me. I carry a dedicated GPS for the same reasons.
Only watch over $100 I've ever got is just one smart watch and I don't really use it much now. My current phone has an always on display so I usually leave it sitting out or visible and can see the notification and which app it's from anyway so I find less use from it now. And yeah the battery life was annoying. Usually lasting only the day, so if I slept over at my girlfriends place it would be dead the next day which sucked. Didn't want to have to bring it's charger everywhere.

As far as GPS goes I just use my phone with Google maps as it has live traffic info and construction info which has helped me quite a bit!!!
[OP]
Sr. Member
User avatar
Jan 24, 2009
708 posts
378 upvotes
Montreal
A bit of background on dive watches.

Rolex came out with the first watch that could withstand pressure in the 1920s.

The "iconic" dive watch that we know today was the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms in 1953. However the Rolex Submariner is the basis for most designs today. Today it is a style of watch that in many cases can be used for diving and will generally be manufactured with better stainless steel that can withstand salt water, have a screw down crown and case back and will have better sealing gaskets.

However things like gaskets tend to dry out and deteriorate, requiring some maintenance.

As stated by the divers in this thread you are much better off using a dive computer, but for me, the occasional vacation diver, not worth the investment. And while on vacation I'll only bring my $50 Casio diver (a really good watch) as I don't care if I lose it or if it gets trashed. I'm rarely diving below 20 meters and for the day of diving I don't have to worry too much about my nitrogen load, and of course the dive master will keep you out of trouble. And funny enough, the dive masters I've been with wear both a dive computer and a mechanical diver, typically a Seiko.

But the watch I wear the most often is my blue Orient Ray II. It just looks gorgeous and it is extremely comfortable. Would I wear it diving? No.

For me, a dive watch is evocative. I grew up on Jacques Cousteau specials, and now very much concerned about the plight of the oceans, which without a doubt sustains life on our planet. When I wear my dive watch, I'm not only brought back to my dreams of being an oceanographer and naturalist, but reminded that we need to take care in our choices that are affecting our oceans (acidification, plastics, overfishing, etc.)
Jr. Member
User avatar
Aug 15, 2017
132 posts
37 upvotes
Ontario
randomroyalty wrote:
Jun 22nd, 2018 10:55 am
A bit of background on dive watches.

Rolex came out with the first watch that could withstand pressure in the 1920s.

The "iconic" dive watch that we know today was the Blancpain Fifty Fathoms in 1953. However the Rolex Submariner is the basis for most designs today. Today it is a style of watch that in many cases can be used for diving and will generally be manufactured with better stainless steel that can withstand salt water, have a screw down crown and case back and will have better sealing gaskets.

However things like gaskets tend to dry out and deteriorate, requiring some maintenance.

As stated by the divers in this thread you are much better off using a dive computer, but for me, the occasional vacation diver, not worth the investment. And while on vacation I'll only bring my $50 Casio diver (a really good watch) as I don't care if I lose it or if it gets trashed. I'm rarely diving below 20 meters and for the day of diving I don't have to worry too much about my nitrogen load, and of course the dive master will keep you out of trouble. And funny enough, the dive masters I've been with wear both a dive computer and a mechanical diver, typically a Seiko.

But the watch I wear the most often is my blue Orient Ray II. It just looks gorgeous and it is extremely comfortable. Would I wear it diving? No.

For me, a dive watch is evocative. I grew up on Jacques Cousteau specials, and now very much concerned about the plight of the oceans, which without a doubt sustains life on our planet. When I wear my dive watch, I'm not only brought back to my dreams of being an oceanographer and naturalist, but reminded that we need to take care in our choices that are affecting our oceans (acidification, plastics, overfishing, etc.)
Yeah in your case it does make a bit more sense though to use however as it sounds like you're just going with a dive master on a "try scuba" style excersion even having that watch isn't needed that much. Usually your pressure gauge also gives depth anyway, at least almost all of them should. Which usually defeats the purpose of having a dive watch like this.
[OP]
Sr. Member
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Jan 24, 2009
708 posts
378 upvotes
Montreal
Fogest wrote:
Jun 22nd, 2018 3:04 pm
Yeah in your case it does make a bit more sense though to use however as it sounds like you're just going with a dive master on a "try scuba" style excersion even having that watch isn't needed that much. Usually your pressure gauge also gives depth anyway, at least almost all of them should. Which usually defeats the purpose of having a dive watch like this.
I'm actually NAUI certified since 1995 but I haven't fallen into the dive hobby obsession. There just aren't that many opportunities to dive the way I like in Canada, and why would I want to invest in a ton of gear and lug it around the globe for a vacation that may or may not revolve around diving. I have other interests than working my way up to dive master or instructor. So I'm happy just going for a recert on a lark when an opportunity presents itself and I like my life that way.

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