Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon.ca] De buyer 8 inch carbon steel Mineral b pan $34.16

  • Last Updated:
  • May 15th, 2020 12:21 pm
[OP]
Member
Feb 6, 2007
392 posts
241 upvotes

[Amazon.ca] De buyer 8 inch carbon steel Mineral b pan $34.16

Amazon has the de buyer 8” mineral b carbon steel frying pan on sale for $34.16. Been watching these for a while and this looks like the lowest since 2018 ($29). Good size for 1-2 eggs or searing a small steak.

9.5” is more handy for general use but not on sale yet.

Edit looks like 9.5 is also 30% off now

De Buyer 5610.24A 9.5" Mineral B Round Carbon Steel Fry Pan, Small, Metallic https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00462QP0M/ref ... TEb8MWNKT5


These are great once seasoned and will last forever with proper care.

de Buyer 22300 Mineral B Element Round Frying Pan, Gray https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B00462QP0C/ref ... TEbGY476PM
49 replies
Member
Dec 30, 2017
467 posts
551 upvotes
GTA
Thanks OP
Had got the 9.5 inch one for $53. Will order this one and return that.
Jr. Member
Feb 29, 2004
167 posts
80 upvotes
The 9.5" is down to $46.

I'm debating if I should get the 8" too.
Deal Addict
Aug 16, 2015
1088 posts
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Toronto, ON
justrajdeep wrote: Thanks OP
Had got the 9.5 inch one for $53. Will order this one and return that.
TifaLockhart wrote: The 9.5" is down to $46.

I'm debating if I should get the 8" too.
8" is a very small pan, and really more for specific uses (and if using on gas could be an issue if you don't have small burners). The 9.5" will be a more useful pan overall.
Deal Addict
Apr 30, 2009
1885 posts
2350 upvotes
GTA
For anybody wanting more details, these are: https://www.debuyer.com/en/products/min ... nd-fry-pan

8" = 20cm outside diameter, 14cm (5.5") inside flat bottom
9.5" = 24cm outside diameter, 17.5cm (~7") inside flat bottom
both are 2.5mm thick steel (larger sizes are 3mm thick steel)

Pan is beeswax coated (wash off before use), then season it.
Handles are epoxy coated steel, which seems to have become common for de Buyer now.
Newbie
User avatar
Jun 5, 2010
40 posts
22 upvotes
Toronto
If you're wanting to make a daily driver out of a pan, you need a ~12" diameter.
Member
Oct 28, 2004
365 posts
120 upvotes
Thanks OP. Just bought the 9.5 inch. Do these pans scratch? I’ve ruined a lot of pans by accidentally scratching them while cooking or improperly storing them. Hoping this hard material will be better for scratch resistance?
Newbie
Dec 18, 2005
46 posts
17 upvotes
Glencairn
I've had these for years and use them daily, they build up a finish like non stick without all the chemicals. They will scratch but I just re-season and it's fine. Mostly use silicon in them for best results.
Deal Addict
Jan 17, 2008
1589 posts
466 upvotes
We purchased the crepe pan a few years ago and it's been amazing. We'll worth the money!
Jr. Member
Feb 29, 2004
167 posts
80 upvotes
palanski wrote: If you're wanting to make a daily driver out of a pan, you need a ~12" diameter.
Thanks. I'm going with the 9 5 and the 11 combo. The 12 has that silly helper handle. Good deals and great advice.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 6, 2002
5877 posts
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Toronto
palanski wrote: If you're wanting to make a daily driver out of a pan, you need a ~12" diameter.
The 11" Country Chef deep(er) pan is ideal for 95% of needs, it's my go-to.. I have this 8" and the 11" fry pans as well. The 8" usually gets used for toasting nuts and other high heat low volume needs (and occasional breakfasts for 1.)

It's also slightly discounted today: https://www.amazon.ca/MINERAL-Round-Cou ... B00601JWCK
A glass of wine with you, sir, and the ladies I'll enjoy.
Revolutionary times must on occasion make do with considerable abridgements in order to accentuate the political line more strongly.
Deal Addict
Aug 31, 2010
4021 posts
1764 upvotes
palanski wrote: If you're wanting to make a daily driver out of a pan, you need a ~12" diameter.
I like the 9.5" a bit better than the 12, but I guess it depends what you're cooking.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 6, 2002
5877 posts
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Toronto
Bl0art wrote: Mostly use silicon in them for best results.
Whutt?
A glass of wine with you, sir, and the ladies I'll enjoy.
Revolutionary times must on occasion make do with considerable abridgements in order to accentuate the political line more strongly.
Jr. Member
Jan 22, 2018
197 posts
205 upvotes
I have the 10 inch version. Worth every penny over the cast iron frying pans, this is wayyy lighter
Deal Expert
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Aug 18, 2005
20035 posts
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Burlington-Hamilton
georgep wrote: 8" is a very small pan, and really more for specific uses (and if using on gas could be an issue if you don't have small burners). The 9.5" will be a more useful pan overall.
Agreed. I have the 12.5" version and it's amazing for steaks. Absolutely love it. I went through 10 cycles of flax oil seasoning in the oven before I cooked anything in the pan.
What if there were no hypothetical questions?
Newbie
Nov 25, 2019
66 posts
69 upvotes
georgep wrote: 8" is a very small pan, and really more for specific uses (and if using on gas could be an issue if you don't have small burners). The 9.5" will be a more useful pan overall.
How come it might be an issue if using it on a gas range? Sorry if it's obvious I'm just not making the connection.
Deal Addict
Jan 3, 2007
1131 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
9.5 is the one you need for your typical 2 egg omelette. 7" cooking surface.

8 is too small for that, but has its uses of course.
Deal Addict
Jan 3, 2007
1131 posts
566 upvotes
Toronto
tropicana wrote: Thanks OP. Just bought the 9.5 inch. Do these pans scratch? I’ve ruined a lot of pans by accidentally scratching them while cooking or improperly storing them. Hoping this hard material will be better for scratch resistance?
They do scratch. Scratched mine with the corner of a metal spatula. I would avoid using sharp metal on them.
Deal Addict
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Jan 22, 2014
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tropicana wrote: Thanks OP. Just bought the 9.5 inch. Do these pans scratch? I’ve ruined a lot of pans by accidentally scratching them while cooking or improperly storing them. Hoping this hard material will be better for scratch resistance?
Bl0art wrote: I've had these for years and use them daily, they build up a finish like non stick without all the chemicals. They will scratch but I just re-season and it's fine. Mostly use silicon in them for best results.
It's carbon steel. If you manage to scratch it in any significant way you're doing something very wrong. If you mean you scratch the seasoning, then there's a better kind of seasoning you should consider. It's more work and time but gives you a bulletproof nonstick surface:

http://sherylcanter.com/wordpress/2010/ ... cast-iron/

And I'd still recommend reading that even if you watch this too:

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