Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon.ca] De'Longhi ComforTemp Portable Radiator Heater - EW7707CBCA $88.42

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 23rd, 2020 12:16 pm
Sr. Member
Jul 23, 2010
509 posts
134 upvotes
Toronto
willy156 wrote: Looking for the Delonghi Dragon4/TRD40615 and this looks to be a cheap alternative
The dragon 4 went on sale last week for $119 and combine with ugo wallet promo $10, got it for 124 tax in. It looks much more modern. Also compared it with the slim style heater at $130.
Sr. Member
Nov 12, 2011
733 posts
274 upvotes
Ontario
Tactical wrote: The dragon 4 went on sale last week for $119 and combine with ugo wallet promo $10, got it for 124 tax in. It looks much more modern. Also compared it with the slim style heater at $130.
is the dragon 4 still on sale? where did you get yours?
Deal Addict
Jul 22, 2019
1026 posts
1143 upvotes
Hmm that Canadian tire one is cheap. Wonder quality. I’ll probably get this one
Sr. Member
Jul 23, 2010
509 posts
134 upvotes
Toronto
willy156 wrote: is the dragon 4 still on sale? where did you get yours?
No not right now. Amazon and Bestbuy last week.
Also want to add these oil heaters are so quiet. There is just no sound. Use it for the basement.
Member
Jun 5, 2007
241 posts
173 upvotes
Shangri-La
If you ran one these heaters 24/7 at the 1000 watt setting it would use about 90 bucks worth of electricity a month even if you cut the use in half that's a lot on money and not a lot of heat.
Deal Addict
Nov 9, 2008
2295 posts
444 upvotes
Thornhill
cheers2 wrote: If you ran one these heaters 24/7 at the 1000 watt setting it would use about 90 bucks worth of electricity a month even if you cut the use in half that's a lot on money and not a lot of heat.
Are there better alternatives to heat a single room?
Deal Addict
Aug 10, 2003
1124 posts
308 upvotes
Winnipeg
sunnyplaya wrote: I wanted to buy one of these to save on heating cost but I remember reading that it costs the same to run these as electric baseboard heaters, assuming the same amount of heat. So what's the benefit of these then?
Electric heat is electric heat - no matter the source. Same cost per kwh. Fan forced heaters are not as efficient as the oil filled heaters - as the fan motor uses electricity to blow the heat around - while with an oil filled heater the heat rises ...slowly... but at no additional cost.

If you want to save on heating cost - ensure you have covered these items first:

* plastic on your window. Each layer of plastic adds to the 'R' value of the glass and reduces air infiltration. Window glass is the worst for loosing heat ... well except for gaping holes in the walls... or kids standing in open doorways. If you put plastic on the *outside* of the window - be sure to add some vent holes in it (top and bottom) to allow moisture to escape (I use a match that I light - then immediately blow out - then press the still hot end on the plastic to melt a small vent hole).

* Weather-stripping under and around your doors.

* Set back thermostat for when you are away and at night while sleeping

* A sweater and a blanket for cuddling up while reading RedFlag Deals

* Reducing the flow of heat to unoccupied rooms. Don't totally turn it off as you run into mold / condensation issues (or pipes freezing).

* Have your furnace inspected / cleaned to ensure it is operating properly (and safely).

* Additional attic insulation (ensuring the insulation does not touch the roof underside and that soffit vents are not obstructed)

An oil filled heater is very quiet (just a 'click' when the thermostat comes on or off) - unlike a fan forced heater (which blows - literally). Many oil filled heaters have multiple wattage settings - e.g. 600, 900, 1,500 - which allows you to use a lower wattage setting (like 600 watts) so as not to overload the wiring to the heater and to lower the surface temperature of the heater. The heat from an oil filled heater is even - not a blast of heat ... then no heat ... like that from a fan forced or quartz heater when it comes on and then goes off).
Jr. Member
Feb 3, 2019
139 posts
86 upvotes
Brampton,ON, Canada
been looking for one of these. Bought one. Thanks OP!
[OP]
Newbie
Apr 27, 2017
59 posts
91 upvotes
willy156 wrote: Looking for the Delonghi Dragon4/TRD40615 and this looks to be a cheap alternative

Interestingly enough on the amazon listings, the one I posted(cheaper version) shows a manufacturer warranty of 3 years, but the Dragon4 only has a manufacturer warranty of 1 year. For being a cheaper version

Only real difference appears to be a built in timer on the dragon4, and obviously a pretty aesthetically pleasing design. But it's missing the easy Comfortemp button for low power comfort setting(which honestly isnt that big of a deal)
Sr. Member
Dec 26, 2010
978 posts
695 upvotes
saw some one carrying a similar looking model from the mall earlier today. sucker! thanks OP
Sr. Member
Jul 11, 2017
526 posts
591 upvotes
cheers2 wrote: If you ran one these heaters 24/7 at the 1000 watt setting it would use about 90 bucks worth of electricity a month even if you cut the use in half that's a lot on money and not a lot of heat.
The province of Quebec is laughing at you!
Member
Jun 5, 2007
241 posts
173 upvotes
Shangri-La
Bella125 wrote: The province of Quebec is laughing at you!
Well actually my house is heated will natural gas, 2000 sf is just over 100 dollars on equal billing also includes hot water. Electricity is 100 a month equal billing.
Newbie
Apr 24, 2019
20 posts
4 upvotes
careh wrote: Electric heat is electric heat - no matter the source. Same cost per kwh. Fan forced heaters are not as efficient as the oil filled heaters - as the fan motor uses electricity to blow the heat around - while with an oil filled heater the heat rises ...slowly... but at no additional cost.

If you want to save on heating cost - ensure you have covered these items first:

* plastic on your window. Each layer of plastic adds to the 'R' value of the glass and reduces air infiltration. Window glass is the worst for loosing heat ... well except for gaping holes in the walls... or kids standing in open doorways. If you put plastic on the *outside* of the window - be sure to add some vent holes in it (top and bottom) to allow moisture to escape (I use a match that I light - then immediately blow out - then press the still hot end on the plastic to melt a small vent hole).

* Weather-stripping under and around your doors.

* Set back thermostat for when you are away and at night while sleeping

* A sweater and a blanket for cuddling up while reading RedFlag Deals

* Reducing the flow of heat to unoccupied rooms. Don't totally turn it off as you run into mold / condensation issues (or pipes freezing).

* Have your furnace inspected / cleaned to ensure it is operating properly (and safely).

* Additional attic insulation (ensuring the insulation does not touch the roof underside and that soffit vents are not obstructed)

An oil filled heater is very quiet (just a 'click' when the thermostat comes on or off) - unlike a fan forced heater (which blows - literally). Many oil filled heaters have multiple wattage settings - e.g. 600, 900, 1,500 - which allows you to use a lower wattage setting (like 600 watts) so as not to overload the wiring to the heater and to lower the surface temperature of the heater. The heat from an oil filled heater is even - not a blast of heat ... then no heat ... like that from a fan forced or quartz heater when it comes on and then goes off).
Thanks for that. I do follow most of this advice already. Need to recheck weather stripping around entry doors. Those are the coldest areas in our house.

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