Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon Canada] Filtrete Clean Living Basic Dust Filter, MPR 300, 16 x 25 x 1-Inches, 6-Pack, 27% Off, $34.05, Reg. $46.72

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 17th, 2018 1:28 am
[OP]
Sr. Member
Oct 5, 2005
521 posts
133 upvotes

[Amazon Canada] Filtrete Clean Living Basic Dust Filter, MPR 300, 16 x 25 x 1-Inches, 6-Pack, 27% Off, $34.05, Reg. $46.72

Had a camel notification setup on these. For those who don't need a super high MERV/MPR, this is a good deal.

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be good!
34 replies
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Feb 14, 2010
592 posts
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Toronto
moneybags wrote:
Nov 8th, 2018 6:08 pm
Had a camel notification setup on these. For those who don't need a super high MERV/MPR, this is a good deal.

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Actually the lower rated ones are better for your furnace. Doesn't have to work as hard pushing the air through the filter. I used to use the highest rated ones til the maintenance guy said it would kill my furnace sooner.
Sr. Member
Nov 14, 2006
872 posts
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GTA
nivek_k2020 wrote:
Nov 8th, 2018 6:35 pm
Actually the lower rated ones are better for your furnace. Doesn't have to work as hard pushing the air through the filter. I used to use the highest rated ones til the maintenance guy said it would kill my furnace sooner.

I'm an a commercial HVAC/R mechanic and i'll have to disagree with that. The more efficient the filter the less air will go through it yes, also the dirtier the filter the more efficient it becomes, yep I said that. The problem happens is the more efficient/dirty the filter is the less air the blower motor can move. Hence the less air it moves the less work its doing, the less amps its using = less electrical. So less air going through it = less work the motor is doing but means less air going through the furnace, this is where problems occur.

The more your filter lets through the dirtier your blower sections/heat exchanger and more critical the cooling coil becomes plugged. So there has to be a common balance of efficiently and minimum air flow. The furnace needs a certain TD (temperature difference) when its cooling/heating to work properly or safeties will keep your furnace out.

The only proper way to confirm the filter you choose is fine for you system is using a pressure differential instrument to see air coming to filter, after filter then after at the supply side at furnace.

Didn't expect to write that much, oh well.
Member
Oct 25, 2001
259 posts
61 upvotes
Toronto
lilmikey wrote:
Nov 8th, 2018 7:45 pm
I'm an a commercial HVAC/R mechanic and i'll have to disagree with that. The more efficient the filter the less air will go through it yes, also the dirtier the filter the more efficient it becomes, yep I said that. The problem happens is the more efficient/dirty the filter is the less air the blower motor can move. Hence the less air it moves the less work its doing, the less amps its using = less electrical. So less air going through it = less work the motor is doing but means less air going through the furnace, this is where problems occur.

The more your filter lets through the dirtier your blower sections/heat exchanger and more critical the cooling coil becomes plugged. So there has to be a common balance of efficiently and minimum air flow. The furnace needs a certain TD (temperature difference) when its cooling/heating to work properly or safeties will keep your furnace out.

The only proper way to confirm the filter you choose is fine for you system is using a pressure differential instrument to see air coming to filter, after filter then after at the supply side at furnace.

Didn't expect to write that much, oh well.
So in general, for the majority of systems out there, would you say these are sufficient?
Sr. Member
Nov 14, 2006
872 posts
272 upvotes
GTA
Miguel Sánchez wrote:
Nov 8th, 2018 8:02 pm
So in general, for the majority of systems out there, would you say these are sufficient?
Yes, any of the filters you can get at the at the hardware stores will be fine, the filter in your furnace isn't a place to cheap out people. If you do go into a more efficient filter than normal and then you notice your furnace is making more noise (its from the air flow restriction) you may want to go to the lower efficiently, thats only when Id say go with a lower one.

When you start getting into HEPA style filters, UV systems thats when you would need proper readings to confirm your system is working properly.

Honestly guys, when people call me and say their AC isn't working or furnace cycling in heating on and off, 50% time the filter is plugged up and no airflow. other 25% of times its blower motor failed/low freon/ignition startup failures.

Stay on top of your filters and many years of trouble free service ahead for ya.
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Dec 19, 2007
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Manitouwadge, Ontari…
So is this like equivalent to like a Merv 3? I like 8 or so.
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lilmikey wrote:
Nov 8th, 2018 7:45 pm
I'm an a commercial HVAC/R mechanic and i'll have to disagree with that. The more efficient the filter the less air will go through it yes, also the dirtier the filter the more efficient it becomes, yep I said that. The problem happens is the more efficient/dirty the filter is the less air the blower motor can move. Hence the less air it moves the less work its doing, the less amps its using = less electrical. So less air going through it = less work the motor is doing but means less air going through the furnace, this is where problems occur.

The more your filter lets through the dirtier your blower sections/heat exchanger and more critical the cooling coil becomes plugged. So there has to be a common balance of efficiently and minimum air flow. The furnace needs a certain TD (temperature difference) when its cooling/heating to work properly or safeties will keep your furnace out.

The only proper way to confirm the filter you choose is fine for you system is using a pressure differential instrument to see air coming to filter, after filter then after at the supply side at furnace.

Didn't expect to write that much, oh well.
I'm not an HVAC specialist, but I too think the dust the filter doesn't catch will kill your motor faster than motor's extra work, if there is any.
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User avatar
Oct 27, 2006
494 posts
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lilmikey wrote:
Nov 8th, 2018 7:45 pm
I'm an a commercial HVAC/R mechanic and i'll have to disagree with that. The more efficient the filter the less air will go through it yes, also the dirtier the filter the more efficient it becomes, yep I said that. The problem happens is the more efficient/dirty the filter is the less air the blower motor can move. Hence the less air it moves the less work its doing, the less amps its using = less electrical. So less air going through it = less work the motor is doing but means less air going through the furnace, this is where problems occur.

The more your filter lets through the dirtier your blower sections/heat exchanger and more critical the cooling coil becomes plugged. So there has to be a common balance of efficiently and minimum air flow. The furnace needs a certain TD (temperature difference) when its cooling/heating to work properly or safeties will keep your furnace out.

The only proper way to confirm the filter you choose is fine for you system is using a pressure differential instrument to see air coming to filter, after filter then after at the supply side at furnace.

Didn't expect to write that much, oh well.
where can I get a pressure differential instrument?
once the motor died and the mechanic brought a new motor and told us to not cheap out, we bought the more expensive stuff but noticed that airflow made the filter all sucked up (it was curved by the time we needed to replace after the 3rd month)...so how do we even know which one to get? we bought the expensive 3m Filtrete 1500 and 100 filtration level 3-pack
:cheesygri LOCATION: TORONTO :cheesygri :cheesygri PM me if interested or if you have any other questions. :cheesygri
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Aug 21, 2007
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These "will it kill my furnace" concerns always come up in filter threads. There are way too many variables to answer that question (the type of blower motor you have makes a big difference), but also important to note is that the Merv rating across filter brands does not have a direct relationship to the pressure drop. Different brands perform vastly differently. Performing accurate pressure differentials tests is very difficult so the manufacturer claims are almost never tested. There's no regulations regarding this so the whole industry is in a giant gray area. source: http://www.homeenergy.org/show/article/ ... e/4/id/667

Basically just buy whatever is on sale. And change them often.
Last edited by SomeGuyNamedBob on Nov 8th, 2018 10:28 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Sr. Member
Jun 11, 2010
860 posts
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ottawa
Thanks OP - seems like a great price for over a year's worth of furnace filters. I hate finding them so may as well stock up.
Member
May 30, 2013
255 posts
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Markham
Remember the main purpose of a furnace filter is not to make the air in your house cleaner, it is there to protector your furnace and the blower motor.
There is no reason to use those "close to HEPA" filter; change your filter every 2 to 3 months, then using a MERV 6 or 8 filter will be fine.

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