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[Amazon Canada] Get Out, Us, Split UHD ($13)

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 20th, 2019 9:42 am
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 29, 2011
637 posts
671 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL

[Amazon Canada] Get Out, Us, Split UHD ($13)

noticed a few great films's UHD discs are pretty cheap right now: Get Out, Us, Split, and even E.T.!
all $13.

Get Out: https://www.amazon.ca/Get-Ultra-Blu-ray ... EQB&sr=1-9

Us: https://www.amazon.ca/Ultra-Blu-ray-Dig ... vd&sr=1-10

Split: https://www.amazon.ca/Split-Ultra-Blu-r ... vd&sr=1-11

E.T. : https://www.amazon.ca/T-Extra-Terrestri ... dvd&sr=1-8

note for those particular about picture quality: yes, all but E.T. are upscaled, but HDR is what most people will notice more than resolution at home.
37 replies
Deal Addict
Feb 19, 2017
1665 posts
1004 upvotes
Upvote for telling people how it is about HDR
RFD is love. RFD is life. I wish I had an RFDer for a wife.
Member
Nov 25, 2014
258 posts
183 upvotes
Toronto, ON
ET is no longer available at that price point.. :( But very good deal OP...
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 29, 2011
637 posts
671 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL
LoANeal wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 7:36 am
Upvote for telling people how it is about HDR
thanks :)

i also think it's better to have hardware upres'd footage direct from the studios, but that's probably a more controversial opinion on RFD. but since 4k projectors in cinemas are a lot more common now, i think they would just do it as part of their regular routine, since 2k DCPs projected at 4k does not look the best...
Member
Jan 5, 2016
324 posts
191 upvotes
Edmonton, AB
Wonder where the Digital copy can be redeemed? Hopefully not Ultraviolet!
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2010
570 posts
298 upvotes
Vancouver
"note for those particular about picture quality: yes, all but E.T. are upscaled, but HDR is what most people will notice more than resolution at home."

Can you give me a quick education on this? Should I infer that movies that are upscaled are inferior to ones that are NOT (like ET). And where do you see this info on the box?
Member
May 29, 2009
315 posts
34 upvotes
ON
Diggingupbones wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 11:52 am
Wonder where the Digital copy can be redeemed? Hopefully not Ultraviolet!
I'm genuinely curious about this. Since MoviesAnywhere has become the de facto ultraviolet replacement, what is actually happening for new redemption codes in Canadian copies of the discs?

I have a fairly large collection of movies but haven't bought any recently, so I'm curious.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 29, 2011
637 posts
671 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL
Diggingupbones wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 11:52 am
Wonder where the Digital copy can be redeemed? Hopefully not Ultraviolet!
i got the normal Get Out bluray just last week. was able to redeem on iTunes AND Flixster (since UV is gone now) -- which really means Google Play, since Flixster is shutting down soon.

great deal IMHO, $13 for UHD, bluray, iTunes, and Google Play!
Member
May 29, 2009
315 posts
34 upvotes
ON
gotglint wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 12:12 pm
see my response to Diggin' :)
Thanks. I did hear about flixster migration to Google Play which is good! Looking forward it seems it might be iTunes-only once flixster shuts down in a couple weeks :(
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 29, 2011
637 posts
671 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL
shabbydog wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 12:00 pm
"note for those particular about picture quality: yes, all but E.T. are upscaled, but HDR is what most people will notice more than resolution at home."

Can you give me a quick education on this? Should I infer that movies that are upscaled are inferior to ones that are NOT (like ET). And where do you see this info on the box?
in a way, yes. in a way, no.

4k was the generally accepted resolution count for 35mm film. so that's why any film that's scanned at full resolution is deemed "Native 4k".

since the change to digital cinematography in the last 11 or so years (the first film shot on a prototype Red 4k cinema camera was 2008's "Che", which means it was shot in 2007), up until the last few years, only the Red camera was native 4k resolution. BUT, most cinematographers prefer shooting with the Arri Alexa.

up until last year, Alexa did not have native 4k resolution. the original Alexa i think was 2.4k or something like that, and more recent iterations were 2.8k or 3.2k (depending on what the camera was set at).

so that means a lot of movies you've seen in the past 10 years were never shot at 4k -- which was fine, since theatres started converting to only 2k digital projectors (i think around 2008/2009...Avatar incentivized theatres to switch to digital).

as an example of how resolution isn't a huge deal, even movies like 007 Skyfall were not shot at 4k. so obviously it's not a money issue, nor is Roger Deakins (one of the greatest cinematographers ever) worried about the lower resolution.

so TECHNICALLY movies that are upscaled are inferior. but in practice, i would say most consumers wouldn't notice.

now, adding to further complication, theatres have started moving to 4k projectors. which even the art filmmaker Wong Kar-Wai said he noticed his films didn't look as good when he first saw them projected at 4k from a 2k master (source: https://filmmakermagazine.com/107445-wo ... M8V05NKjOR)

SO...i think studios know that they HAVE to make 4k Masters of the films now, since both Home Viewing and Theatres are moving in that direction. even though most productions are still filming with less than 4k resolution, and doing all the VFX work at 2k, they will probably do proper hardware upscaling for final output/archiving. (this is just speculation by me though, but i would think it makes business sense, and it shouldn't be too much of an extra cost).

all this to say, i think recent films that are shot or finished at 2k, but upscaled to 4k...are pretty safe bets for purchase. since the work was done at 2k, we'll probably not get better quality for a while, if at all. for example, films like Get Out, Us, and Split (at least from the info i've gleaned from their UHD reviews -- no info is stated on the box. used to have the site "real 4k or fake 4k" but that's gone now)

sorry for the long post.
hope that answered anything you were wondering about.

who knows if there's anything beyond 4k, 8k, that we have now....Hollywood is great at coming up with new things for us to open our wallets!
Last edited by gotglint on Oct 16th, 2019 12:51 pm, edited 2 times in total.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 29, 2011
637 posts
671 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL
Brandon26 wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 12:32 pm
Why do people still even buy movies? Can get them for free on thousands of websites...without giving the actors/producers of these sub-par movies boatloads of money.
i support things i care about and want to view in its optimal/intended way. i only buy films i know i love or have good reputations.

i bought movies like Phantom Thread and Annihilation for example, where i respect the work of the filmmaker and their intentions.

i've also compared quality of (legit) streaming to the blurays i have and although for a lot of films i wouldn't notice much difference, there are titles (esp those shot on film) where there is a very big quality difference.

(average 2 hour movie is 6gbs, where average bluray is 30gb...so that's a lot of information not being translated over)

also, films wouldn't get made if everyone stole them.
Sr. Member
Jun 26, 2010
570 posts
298 upvotes
Vancouver
Wow, that was super helpful. I had no clue about the last decade of movies being shot in digital/2.4k.
Thank you!

You're obviously quite the expert... I have one more question and relates to HDR since you received kudos from someone else about making the HDR distinction in your post.
I recently upgraded my Netflix subscription to the premium plan that includes UHD/4k content. However, when I look at the content, there actually isn't a lot of UHD/4k content, and what's out there is mostly nature documentaries. I do see a lot of content that indicate 'HDR' though, ie Stranger Things and many other scripted shows.
For whatever reason, I thought content indicating 'HDR' was inferior to content labelled as '4K UHD'. Probably because of the way Netflix stresses '4K UHD' availability in the marketing for the Premium subscription.
I'm realizing from this post that's a stupid way to look at it because it sounds like HDR is more about the image quality and 4k has to do with resolution, and they're not mutually exclusive. HDR content encompasses 4K... right?
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Mar 15, 2010
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shabbydog wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 12:54 pm
HDR content encompasses 4K... right?
Typically, yes. Although HDR isn't exclusive to 4K--an original PS4 can use HDR without the need to upgrade to a Pro... but it's just 1080p with High Dynamic Range. Almost all 4K UHD blu-ray releases have HDR in one way or another (HDR, HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision).
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Jun 26, 2010
570 posts
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Vancouver
mumbles wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 1:04 pm
Typically, yes. Although HDR isn't exclusive to 4K--an original PS4 can use HDR without the need to upgrade to a Pro... but it's just 1080p with High Dynamic Range. Almost all 4K UHD blu-ray releases have HDR in one way or another (HDR, HDR10, HDR10+, Dolby Vision).
I see... it's the other way around. Thanks!
[OP]
Sr. Member
Nov 29, 2011
637 posts
671 upvotes
RICHMOND HILL
shabbydog wrote:
Oct 16th, 2019 12:54 pm
Wow, that was super helpful. I had no clue about the last decade of movies being shot in digital/2.4k.
Thank you!

You're obviously quite the expert... I have one more question and relates to HDR since you received kudos from someone else about making the HDR distinction in your post.
I recently upgraded my Netflix subscription to the premium plan that includes UHD/4k content. However, when I look at the content, there actually isn't a lot of UHD/4k content, and what's out there is mostly nature documentaries. I do see a lot of content that indicate 'HDR' though, ie Stranger Things and many other scripted shows.
For whatever reason, I thought content indicating 'HDR' was inferior to content labelled as '4K UHD'. Probably because of the way Netflix stresses '4K UHD' availability in the marketing for the Premium subscription.
I'm realizing from this post that's a stupid way to look at it because it sounds like HDR is more about the image quality and 4k has to do with resolution, and they're not mutually exclusive. HDR content encompasses 4K... right?
HDR's a weird one, and i admit i don't quite understand it all. (i don't have a 4k TV, or player yet).

as far as I can tell, it seems to be only for the home video market?
i don't think any cinema projector plays HDR natively right now.

i'm sure if theatres upgrade to HDR, then doing an HDR pass -- or shooting HDR natively, which Panavision was suppose to be working on a camera to do years ago...but i've never heard about it again -- will become standard for movies. but not yet?

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