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Gooloo S4 4-Amp car battery charger, maintainer, & desulfator, $40 after coupon (Prime one day)

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Jan 27, 2006
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logitvx wrote: I'll definitely look into an Analyzer then too. If I can get away with an analyzer and a charger (that doubles as the maintenance.. we'll go with that). - if you have suggestions on analyzer i'm open to that too.

I'm hoping that if I use the analyzer often enough I can avoid the hassle of worrying to quick start the car. Wouldn't your second question be remediated with a jumper pack/booster pack?

Scenario in my case is actually a brand new battery was put in.. and due to circumstances we didn't really drive the vehicle and it drained again. Not sure if we killed the battery, i guess analyzer would tell but was going to try to give it a bit of a charge. I have read some chargers don't do well if the battery is below a certain voltage though....

Edit: I didn't think charging would be the deep end!! or was it the maintenance side ?

(Sorry to everyone for derailing the thread..)
The way I look at it, anyone looking to buy a charger is looking for very similar information that you are looking for. BTW> There's a whole thread on this stuff - car-batteries-faq-general-information-t ... s-2161758/.

Having an analyzer is the way to go. For most people, a basic conductance tester will do and Princess Auto has one for $30 almost all of the time which is about as cheap as it gets for one of these testers - https://www.princessauto.com/en/12v-bat ... 0008943383.

As for the booster pack bit, yes, that's the point. Some people buy chargers thinking that they are "instant" chargers for when the battery was discharged and they need to go somewhere NOW.

A decent battery maintainer type charger would be the Motormaster 1.5A Precision charger (https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/moto ... p.html#plp) when it goes on sale for 20% off (like now until tomorrow). Being a low current charger, if the battery is drained, it could take two to three days to fully charge the battery again depending on the size and the condition of the battery. Any 'smart' charger doesn't do well if the battery is drained as the smart chargers need to detect some voltage on the battery before starting to charge - if it detects nothing, it assumes that nothing is there and won't start the charging process. Some chargers can override that feature or you can just do a quick jump and then like the charger take over as the jump will give the battery just enough power to be detected by the smart charger.

Draining the battery per se won't kill a battery, especially a new battery. However, leaving it drained (ie jumping it and driving around for 15 minutes thinking that the battery is now fully charged when it's not) will cause sulfation to occur which reduces the capacity of the battery. Always fully charge a lead-acid battery as soon as possible once it's been drained.

If you look through some of the many threads on batteries, the idea of doing anything to the battery - ie charging with an external charger - is going off the deep end for many as they assume that car batteries are onetime use type of disposable batteries and NOTHING can be done to them so when they are 'dead' they get tossed and replaced.
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Jul 11, 2006
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With all due respect to Gooloo, I will stick with something I trust - CTEK MXS 5.0.
I have one for my daily drivers that I use every 3-4 months, and another for my classic car that I keep connected when I'm not driving it.
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Feb 8, 2020
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PerformingAzura wrote: I don't really see the issue.
Presumably both batteries are 12V so the stronger battery will just charge the weaker one until they both equalize.

If you add a charger to the circuit , the charger would see the average of the two voltages.

https://physics.stackexchange.com/quest ... n-parallel

Am I missing something?
yes, you're missing many concepts of circuits 101 and batteries 301. Further all of the following are already explained very well in stackexchange whick funnily enough clearly says that this is not an averaging linkage but an indeterminate situation.

1) Very valid assumption about one battery charging the other when they are both < 2-3 years old and healthy enough. Most people using battery tenders are definitely trying to extend battery life beyond normal life. As batteries age, the internal resistance goes up (due to electrodes depleting) and they simple can't "hold charge" as chemicals storing it also becomes inert/ irreversibly in inactive state.

As a result, the stronger battery will "try to charge" the weaker battery. But weaker battery's resistance will just dissipate that as heat. The weaker battery's chemicals are dead so they can't hold any more charge beyond a small limit. Where does energy go? As heat dissipation which further damages weaker battery and also this current heats up healthy battery as well due to this leakage current and its internal resistance.

b) The charger will see something else that will depend on exact relative resistances of each wire interconnecting.

Interestingly, the first stackexchange links or this link "https://electronics.stackexchange.com/q ... n-parallel" both explain what I explained. The true parallel voltage is likely indeterminate. Please read the first two answers in your link or the visual / circuit explanation in my link.

EDIT : Edited for very minor grammar issues , 1 factual error.
Jr. Member
Apr 23, 2020
125 posts
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craftsman wrote: The way I look at it, anyone looking to buy a charger is looking for very similar information that you are looking for. BTW> There's a whole thread on this stuff - car-batteries-faq-general-information-t ... s-2161758/.

Having an analyzer is the way to go. For most people, a basic conductance tester will do and Princess Auto has one for $30 almost all of the time which is about as cheap as it gets for one of these testers - https://www.princessauto.com/en/12v-bat ... 0008943383.

As for the booster pack bit, yes, that's the point. Some people buy chargers thinking that they are "instant" chargers for when the battery was discharged and they need to go somewhere NOW.

A decent battery maintainer type charger would be the Motormaster 1.5A Precision charger (https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/moto ... p.html#plp) when it goes on sale for 20% off (like now until tomorrow). Being a low current charger, if the battery is drained, it could take two to three days to fully charge the battery again depending on the size and the condition of the battery. Any 'smart' charger doesn't do well if the battery is drained as the smart chargers need to detect some voltage on the battery before starting to charge - if it detects nothing, it assumes that nothing is there and won't start the charging process. Some chargers can override that feature or you can just do a quick jump and then like the charger take over as the jump will give the battery just enough power to be detected by the smart charger.

Draining the battery per se won't kill a battery, especially a new battery. However, leaving it drained (ie jumping it and driving around for 15 minutes thinking that the battery is now fully charged when it's not) will cause sulfation to occur which reduces the capacity of the battery. Always fully charge a lead-acid battery as soon as possible once it's been drained.

If you look through some of the many threads on batteries, the idea of doing anything to the battery - ie charging with an external charger - is going off the deep end for many as they assume that car batteries are onetime use type of disposable batteries and NOTHING can be done to them so when they are 'dead' they get tossed and replaced.
Thanks! Really appreciate the info! Last Q hopefully from me.. Will also check out that thread.

Will grab the analyzer and that maintainer should be good for my car that doesn't get lots of driving. if I'll splurge and go for a faster "regular charger" - any other recommendations? Was thinking of: https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/moto ... p.html#plp

With my "new battery" that is dead... its not in the garage so would be impractical to keep it charged for long periods of time. i was hoping to throw a charger on it for a few hours to get it up to an "OK point" and then move it into the garage to have it charge to full. Thoughts on this?
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Jan 27, 2006
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logitvx wrote: Thanks! Really appreciate the info! Last Q hopefully from me.. Will also check out that thread.
I don't mind the questions as it's the only way to get the correct information out there so that everyone will benefit.
logitvx wrote: Will grab the analyzer and that maintainer should be good for my car that doesn't get lots of driving. if I'll splurge and go for a faster "regular charger" - any other recommendations? Was thinking of: https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/moto ... p.html#plp
I would recommend getting another charger along with this one. Why? The 1.5A unit is fairly compact and easy for people to take out and use. A larger heavier piece will just make it hard for anyone to use so that they may not want to use it as often and therefore not use it at all! If you want to buy a higher current charger, I wouldn't recommend that one from Motormaster but the Schumacher SC1302 which is an 8A charger and can be found onsale for $30.
logitvx wrote: With my "new battery" that is dead... its not in the garage so would be impractical to keep it charged for long periods of time. i was hoping to throw a charger on it for a few hours to get it up to an "OK point" and then move it into the garage to have it charge to full. Thoughts on this?
Realistically, you don't need to keep the battery charging. If you fully charge the battery and it's in new condition, you'll only see a drop of 3 to 5% a month if it sits there unused and not connected. Since most cars have some level of drain even when things are off - ie to power the clock and other electronics, you may see a few more percent drop. Therefore, if you just charge it once every 3 weeks or so (just use the battery analyzer to see how much it's dropping from week to week or month to month and charge when needed), you should be fine.

Initially, you can always remove the battery from the car and just leave it charging for two or three days (depending on the level of charge on the battery) and then reinstall it.
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Jan 27, 2006
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vimal1 wrote: yes, you're missing many concepts of circuits 101 and batteries 301. Further all of the following are already explained very well in stackexchange whick funnily enough clearly says that this is not an averaging linkage but an indeterminate situation.

1) Very valid assumption about one battery charging the other when they are both < 2-3 years old and healthy enough. Most people using battery tenders are definitely trying to extend battery life beyond normal life. As batteries age, the internal resistance goes up (due to electrodes depleting) and they simple can't "hold charge" as chemicals storing it also becomes inert/ irreversibly in inactive state.

As a result, the stronger battery will "try to charge" the weaker battery. But weaker battery's resistance will just dissipate that as heat. The weaker battery's chemicals are dead so they can't hold any more charge beyond a small limit. Where does energy go? As heat dissipation which further damages weaker battery and also this current heats up healthy battery as well due to this leakage current and its internal resistance.

b) The charger will see something else that will depend on exact relative resistances of each wire interconnecting.

Interestingly, the first stackexchange links or this link "https://electronics.stackexchange.com/q ... n-parallel" both explain what I explained. The true parallel voltage is likely indeterminate. Please read the first two answers in your link or the visual / circuit explanation in my link.

EDIT : Edited for very minor grammar issues , 1 factual error.
A few things:

1. The use of battery tenders is not trying to extend battery life beyond the normal life span of the battery. The use of a battery tender is simply to recharge the battery and that's it. There is no extending normal life. However, the opposite is true - a partially discharged lead-acid battery left for a long period of time will have a shorter than normal service life.

2. The stuff presented does not explain how various battery packs often have individual cells connected in parallel as a standard design. Look inside of any laptop battery or power tool these days and you will find multiple cells connected in parallel.
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Mar 18, 2015
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craftsman wrote: I don't mind the questions as it's the only way to get the correct information out there so that everyone will benefit.



I would recommend getting another charger along with this one. Why? The 1.5A unit is fairly compact and easy for people to take out and use. A larger heavier piece will just make it hard for anyone to use so that they may not want to use it as often and therefore not use it at all! If you want to buy a higher current charger, I wouldn't recommend that one from Motormaster but the Schumacher SC1302 which is an 8A charger and can be found onsale for $30.


Realistically, you don't need to keep the battery charging. If you fully charge the battery and it's in new condition, you'll only see a drop of 3 to 5% a month if it sits there unused and not connected. Since most cars have some level of drain even when things are off - ie to power the clock and other electronics, you may see a few more percent drop. Therefore, if you just charge it once every 3 weeks or so (just use the battery analyzer to see how much it's dropping from week to week or month to month and charge when needed), you should be fine.

Initially, you can always remove the battery from the car and just leave it charging for two or three days (depending on the level of charge on the battery) and then reinstall it.
Hey craftsman, I have a question as well. Due to WFH and busy schedule both our vehicles - a minivan and a sedan do not get driven a lot anymore. The sedan is driven a minimum of 5kms every day with longer (20-30km) drives 2-3 times a week, while the van sees a reasonable long drive on highway twice a month or so, may be a couple smaller trips as well some months.

Would I need something like a 1.5 amp motomaster charger or a Schumacher SC1302 for batteries that are 2 years old?

I am planning to get the battery analyzer anyways to look at the drain.

Thank you for your contribution with these tips. Very appreciated.
Jr. Member
Apr 23, 2020
125 posts
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craftsman wrote: I don't mind the questions as it's the only way to get the correct information out there so that everyone will benefit.



I would recommend getting another charger along with this one. Why? The 1.5A unit is fairly compact and easy for people to take out and use. A larger heavier piece will just make it hard for anyone to use so that they may not want to use it as often and therefore not use it at all! If you want to buy a higher current charger, I wouldn't recommend that one from Motormaster but the Schumacher SC1302 which is an 8A charger and can be found onsale for $30.


Realistically, you don't need to keep the battery charging. If you fully charge the battery and it's in new condition, you'll only see a drop of 3 to 5% a month if it sits there unused and not connected. Since most cars have some level of drain even when things are off - ie to power the clock and other electronics, you may see a few more percent drop. Therefore, if you just charge it once every 3 weeks or so (just use the battery analyzer to see how much it's dropping from week to week or month to month and charge when needed), you should be fine.

Initially, you can always remove the battery from the car and just leave it charging for two or three days (depending on the level of charge on the battery) and then reinstall it.
Ha total brainfart. Totally forgot I can just take out the battery. Long day.

Awesome thanks again! Will grab the 1.5A maintainer as its on sale from Canadian Tire and an analyzer for sure! I know the Schumacher was suggested but question:

If I get the Motomaster 8Amp charger it has options for 2/8/15. Could I not set it on 2AMP and use that as a maintainer instead of having to buy the maintainer as well? Size aside if no course. It’s only me using it so not a big deal for size.
Last edited by logitvx on Jun 22nd, 2022 6:23 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Newbie
Dec 30, 2010
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Looks like some people could help me regarding battery chargers/maintainers/12v supply.

I'm basically looking for something to maintain the voltage and battery charge but mostly voltage while I install tune files on the vehicule (battery connected, ignition on, engine off).

Was looking at either the Noco Genius 10 or this Gooloo but the 10amp version. Was also looking at a Pro-Logix 20a with the 12v supply mode but I kind of like the quick connect on the Noco. They all offer a 12v supply mode which I think is what I want ?

But I would also love if the same device could be used as a battery maintainer (car in storage) and also be used to fully charge a battery (charge RV batteries after summer to full and then switch from charge mode to maintain mode?)

Are those decent products for my needs (wouldn't be used that often) or is there something better/cheaper ?

Gooloo 10a: 60$
Noco 10a: 150$
Pro-Logix 20a: 160$
Newbie
Feb 8, 2020
91 posts
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craftsman wrote:

2. The stuff presented does not explain how various battery packs often have individual cells connected in parallel as a standard design. Look inside of any laptop battery or power tool these days and you will find multiple cells connected in parallel.
I don't know how to answer. Basic physics and circuits won't start behaving different if the world is doing something as a standard design. This likely works since Lithium ion cells work well enough for 5-7 years. The parallel ganging is required to provide higher amps. However, if one cell ever goes bad, it takes the whole battery sub-cell down with it based on basic circuits and physics. I'm sure the battery management system of an EV or even a laptop is fairly complicated since they do wear levelling across subcells along with lot of temperature sensors to detect some subcell going bad and take it out of service, otherwise thermal runaway is what causes burning EVs. The internal currents can definitely cause it.

Regarding what do people use battery tenders for, is really up to the people. A battery tender can charge an old battery, recondition it ( as per the Amazon link ) , so someone might think it can give new life to a dead battery, which it will on the surface.
Member
Mar 8, 2010
454 posts
369 upvotes
Foothills
craftsman wrote: I don't mind the questions as it's the only way to get the correct information out there so that everyone will benefit.



I would recommend getting another charger along with this one. Why? The 1.5A unit is fairly compact and easy for people to take out and use. A larger heavier piece will just make it hard for anyone to use so that they may not want to use it as often and therefore not use it at all! If you want to buy a higher current charger, I wouldn't recommend that one from Motormaster but the Schumacher SC1302 which is an 8A charger and can be found onsale for $30.


Realistically, you don't need to keep the battery charging. If you fully charge the battery and it's in new condition, you'll only see a drop of 3 to 5% a month if it sits there unused and not connected. Since most cars have some level of drain even when things are off - ie to power the clock and other electronics, you may see a few more percent drop. Therefore, if you just charge it once every 3 weeks or so (just use the battery analyzer to see how much it's dropping from week to week or month to month and charge when needed), you should be fine.

Initially, you can always remove the battery from the car and just leave it charging for two or three days (depending on the level of charge on the battery) and then reinstall it.
@craftsman
I'm trying to understand the concept of the various steps (7) in the process of a charger like CTEK - based on what I have read so far they are not warranted?
Jr. Member
Oct 13, 2015
196 posts
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Scarborough, ON
PerformingAzura wrote: I don't really see the issue.
Presumably both batteries are 12V so the stronger battery will just charge the weaker one until they both equalize.

If you add a charger to the circuit , the charger would see the average of the two voltages.

https://physics.stackexchange.com/quest ... n-parallel

Am I missing something?
" stronger battery will just charge the weaker one until they both equalize"-----this is NOT current limited. If you want to connect two batteries in such a way, you should use a battery connecting diode.
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Jan 27, 2006
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Crichtonfan wrote: Hey craftsman, I have a question as well. Due to WFH and busy schedule both our vehicles - a minivan and a sedan do not get driven a lot anymore. The sedan is driven a minimum of 5kms every day with longer (20-30km) drives 2-3 times a week, while the van sees a reasonable long drive on highway twice a month or so, may be a couple smaller trips as well some months.

Would I need something like a 1.5 amp motomaster charger or a Schumacher SC1302 for batteries that are 2 years old?

I am planning to get the battery analyzer anyways to look at the drain.

Thank you for your contribution with these tips. Very appreciated.
The difference between the two chargers is basically the speed from a nearly completely discharged state - ie at near zero charge, the Motormaster will still only charge at 1.5A while the Schumacher will go at 8A. However, as the battery charges, it will start accepting power at a slower rate so that 8As of the Schumacher might only be 4A at 40%, then 2A at 70% while the Motormaster continues to move along at 1.5A. As you may have noticed, as the charge level of the battery gets higher, the rate of charge drops - ie at 80% both the Motormaster and the Schumacher might only charge the battery at the same 1A rate regardless of how much power each one can charge at. Therefore, if you are just topping off the battery regularly - ie not waiting until the battery is nearly empty before charging - both will take about the same amount of time to complete - ie assuming topping off means that you are charging the battery with at least 80% or more charge.

If the above is the case, get the Motormaster as it has a few extra features that might help - ie a charge level indicator, a "repair" mode, built for cold weather. NOTE> I'm not a fan of most repair modes in chargers especially those who are "automatic" as many of them are just applying an equalizing charge (bringing the battery's charge to 15.8V or so in an effort to equalize the charge across all of the cells in the battery) to the battery rather than actually doing a lot of desulfation. While an equalizing charge does help a bit in desulfating a battery, it doesn't help that much. As for automatic desulfation, even if the technology they are using actually works, most of these auto modes only turn it on when the battery is close to dead and won't run it long enough to do a heck of a lot of good so at most it will do is to keep your battery between "close to dead" and "kind of dead". The Motormaster allows you to engage their repair mode manually so you can use it as a preventative maintenance thing before the battery gets close to dead.
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Jan 27, 2006
20004 posts
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logitvx wrote: Ha total brainfart. Totally forgot I can just take out the battery. Long day.

Awesome thanks again! Will grab the 1.5A maintainer as its on sale from Canadian Tire and an analyzer for sure! I know the Schumacher was suggested but question:

If I get the Motomaster 8Amp charger it has options for 2/8/15. Could I not set it on 2AMP and use that as a maintainer instead of having to buy the maintainer as well? Size aside if no course. It’s only me using it so not a big deal for size.
You can but the 8A unit doesn't have a few features that might be useful. Plus some of the reviews for the 8A unit were less than impressive so pass...
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Jan 27, 2006
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blostorm wrote: Looks like some people could help me regarding battery chargers/maintainers/12v supply.

I'm basically looking for something to maintain the voltage and battery charge but mostly voltage while I install tune files on the vehicule (battery connected, ignition on, engine off).

Was looking at either the Noco Genius 10 or this Gooloo but the 10amp version. Was also looking at a Pro-Logix 20a with the 12v supply mode but I kind of like the quick connect on the Noco. They all offer a 12v supply mode which I think is what I want ?

But I would also love if the same device could be used as a battery maintainer (car in storage) and also be used to fully charge a battery (charge RV batteries after summer to full and then switch from charge mode to maintain mode?)

Are those decent products for my needs (wouldn't be used that often) or is there something better/cheaper ?

Gooloo 10a: 60$
Noco 10a: 150$
Pro-Logix 20a: 160$
I'm not getting why you need a 12V supply if you have the battery still connected.., Can't you verify that the battery is fully charged and functional before you start installing the tune files?
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good to know.
ASUS RAMPAGE II EXTREME; i7-950; GTX 560; 16G Mem; 2TB HD; 24x DVD-RAM;
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Jan 27, 2006
20004 posts
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targa88 wrote: @craftsman
I'm trying to understand the concept of the various steps (7) in the process of a charger like CTEK - based on what I have read so far they are not warranted?
Some of the modes are more marketing than anything else... Most people really need 3 modes - bulk (where the bulk of the power is charged into the battery), absorption (the last 20% of the battery's charge is at a slower rate so that the battery can actually get to "FULL") and float (basically keep putting some power into the battery to make up for the self-discharge).

The CTEK documentation takes a couple of liberties with the definition of the above terms from what is generally accepted definitions. In theory, the other modes like RECON and Desulfation are useful if they are implemented correctly. The problem is that the definition of those terms is often massaged by the marketing folks. A good example is desulfation. I picked desulfation as it's listed on many chargers and is poorly implemented or defined in almost all of them. By definition, desulfation means the reversal of the process that creates sulfation in the battery. That sulfation reduces the capacity of the battery. Unfortunately, most vendors use a variant of that definition that is true but doesn't actually mean the same. What the *(^*&^ am I talking about? The normal chemical reaction of a lead-acid battery when it is discharged creates sulfation and the act of charging the battery removes that sulfation. So, by that definition, you can say that any charger will desulfate a battery. Wait you say, how can that be? How? Well, what they leave out is that there are two types of sulfation... soft which can be reversed by just charging and hard which can't. Hard can be reversed by applying a certain charging process over a period of a day or several. Most of these chargers are lucky to apply their process over a period of minutes to hours.
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Mar 18, 2015
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craftsman wrote: The difference between the two chargers is basically the speed from a nearly completely discharged state - ie at near zero charge, the Motormaster will still only charge at 1.5A while the Schumacher will go at 8A. However, as the battery charges, it will start accepting power at a slower rate so that 8As of the Schumacher might only be 4A at 40%, then 2A at 70% while the Motormaster continues to move along at 1.5A. As you may have noticed, as the charge level of the battery gets higher, the rate of charge drops - ie at 80% both the Motormaster and the Schumacher might only charge the battery at the same 1A rate regardless of how much power each one can charge at. Therefore, if you are just topping off the battery regularly - ie not waiting until the battery is nearly empty before charging - both will take about the same amount of time to complete - ie assuming topping off means that you are charging the battery with at least 80% or more charge.

If the above is the case, get the Motormaster as it has a few extra features that might help - ie a charge level indicator, a "repair" mode, built for cold weather. NOTE> I'm not a fan of most repair modes in chargers especially those who are "automatic" as many of them are just applying an equalizing charge (bringing the battery's charge to 15.8V or so in an effort to equalize the charge across all of the cells in the battery) to the battery rather than actually doing a lot of desulfation. While an equalizing charge does help a bit in desulfating a battery, it doesn't help that much. As for automatic desulfation, even if the technology they are using actually works, most of these auto modes only turn it on when the battery is close to dead and won't run it long enough to do a heck of a lot of good so at most it will do is to keep your battery between "close to dead" and "kind of dead". The Motormaster allows you to engage their repair mode manually so you can use it as a preventative maintenance thing before the battery gets close to dead.
Super. Thanks a whole bunch for the information. Given the probably decent state of the batteries (bought new 2 years back and the driving was still decent the first year), I’ll just pick up the motomaster for winter top ups after consulting the analyzer.
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Sep 16, 2013
6204 posts
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craftsman wrote: If the above is the case, get the Motormaster as it has a few extra features that might help - ie a charge level indicator, a "repair" mode, built for cold weather.
...
The Motormaster allows you to engage their repair mode manually so you can use it as a preventative maintenance thing before the battery gets close to dead.
I was looking into it and the Motomaster 1.5A doesn't have a repair mode. It has a reconditioning mode (15.8V). It does desulfation with pulses but only as the first stage of the regular charge. Here is the manual: https://www.manualshelf.com/manual/moto ... age-6.html

Do you know of any charges that do desulfation/repair longer, preferably as a separate mode that runs until turned off?
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Jan 27, 2006
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alpovs wrote: I was looking into it and the Motomaster 1.5A doesn't have a repair mode. It has a reconditioning mode (15.8V). It does desulfation with pulses but only as the first stage of the regular charge. Here is the manual: https://www.manualshelf.com/manual/moto ... age-6.html

Do you know of any charges that do desulfation/repair longer, preferably as a separate mode that runs until turned off?
Charger companies don't use the same names for similar features. These companies should be using the term "Equalization Charge" as that's what most of these chargers do in their repair/recond modes.

As for their desulfation pulses, unless it runs for at least a day or more, these statements about desulfation pulses are useless. I have a CTEK MXS 5.0 which is supposed to those pulses as well and I can tell for a fact that they do absolutely NOTHING to desulfate a battery. How do I know? Because I have tried to run the CTEK multiple times on the same battery in order to desulfate the battery and according to the battery analyzers I have, nothing changed - zip, zero,... However, if I use by DIY desulfating kit from eBay, I can get results after a week (a whole week) on a basic UPS battery and in about a month, the battery has been desulfated. Or I can use a cheap Chinese branded charger from Amazon and run a couple of 20 hour cycles to get similar results. The difference is actually explained in this white paper on pulse charging - http://conference.ioe.edu.np/publicatio ... 017-23.pdf. Basically, it comes down to the frequency of the pulses - the higher the frequency, the better the desulfation.

As for your question, the answer is really YES and NO. Yes, I know of chargers that actually do desulfate for long periods of time and NO, they don't run until it gets turned off but rather there is a time limit (usually about 20 to 24 hours before it turns off) OR it hits a certain voltage (15.85V or so). A bunch of cheap chargers on Amazon does do the trick. There's a good discussion going on in the Battery FAQ which I provided a link for earlier on the different ones. So far, I have two of them working on different theories. One I know works but doesn't work so well on AGM batteries and the other I'm in the process of evaluating.

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