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[Amazon.ca] King Canada KC-6HJC 6" Benchtop Jointer 349.95$ (woodworking tool) ATL

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Member
Mar 14, 2008
338 posts
111 upvotes

[Amazon.ca] King Canada KC-6HJC 6" Benchtop Jointer 349.95$ (woodworking tool) ATL

Good deal on the King Canada KC-6HJC 6" Benchtop Jointer with Helical Cutter Head, all time low for this one.

Should be delivered before Christmas.

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19 replies
Newbie
Sep 11, 2011
29 posts
77 upvotes
DORVAL
login wrote: Good find! Though it's OOS at KMS in store, they might deny you for this but it's worth a try.
Sorry, missed that. Good eye.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Dec 2, 2009
785 posts
312 upvotes
Markham
I bought this at HD last month after a pm for $332.95.

It works really well, I didn't have to do any adjustments to the tables and the fence is actually decent despite being aluminum, I've sent it once and it hasn't moved on me and has stayed 90 degrees.

Only downside is the jointer beds are also made of aluminum, so it scratches easily, especially when using rough lumber. One of the brand new blades had a chip in it so it left a small score on my jointed wood which then scratched the outfield table. The blades for the helical cutter are two sided so I rotated that one around and it fixed it issue.

Overall the pieces come out pretty good and I get nice surfaced face and edge but be careful of the aluminum table.
Jr. Member
Aug 25, 2011
130 posts
164 upvotes
BURLINGTON
Amazing price for a jointer with a spiral cutter. Changing the knives on my old makita is a chore I dread. I also have a small delta of similar construction to this one. The aluminum construction is an advantage because you can move it around. If you are an occasional user, you can store it under a bench. The disadvantage is that the light weight makes it less stable, in a machine where stability is critically important. Also I have spoken to vendors who agree that King tools vary in quality, but generally speaking, the stationary tools are good quality.
Newbie
Nov 26, 2003
84 posts
33 upvotes
Markham
Can this thing really be called a spiral/helical cutterhead? Segmented cutterhead yes but there's nothing helical with the insert set straight across. The aluminum table sounds like a real downside TBH. Is it at least anodized?
Sr. Member
User avatar
Sep 19, 2004
623 posts
71 upvotes
Dang. Gone for me. No more buying options but 540
Sr. Member
Sep 15, 2011
999 posts
530 upvotes
HUNTSVILLE
Charlton wrote: Can this thing really be called a spiral/helical cutterhead? Segmented cutterhead yes but there's nothing helical with the insert set straight across. The aluminum table sounds like a real downside TBH. Is it at least anodized?
As Charlton points out, this isn't really "spiral" from the stance that the cutting blades are angled to the piece being jointed. It has the advantage that each cutter has four edges and that you can replace them individually, but tear-out will be nearly as prominent with this as it is with full length knives. That said, I actually own this one too (paid more than this though :( ) and I'm happy with it. My only complaint is that because the table is so short, if you're jointing long planks, it's a challenge to get full length straight edges - with pine, not a big deal as you can pull edge-glued pine together with sufficient clamping strength. I did a desk with 2" thick hickory and suffice it to say, clamps aren't up to the task of pulling that together! I had to do some jointing with some handplanes (which is fun to do).
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
45335 posts
5880 upvotes
Richmond Hill
hoody123 wrote: As Charlton points out, this isn't really "spiral" from the stance that the cutting blades are angled to the piece being jointed. It has the advantage that each cutter has four edges and that you can replace them individually, but tear-out will be nearly as prominent with this as it is with full length knives. That said, I actually own this one too (paid more than this though :( ) and I'm happy with it. My only complaint is that because the table is so short, if you're jointing long planks, it's a challenge to get full length straight edges - with pine, not a big deal as you can pull edge-glued pine together with sufficient clamping strength. I did a desk with 2" thick hickory and suffice it to say, clamps aren't up to the task of pulling that together! I had to do some jointing with some handplanes (which is fun to do).
I agree but this shouldn't be a complaint about the jointer considering this is a benchtop jointer! People who buy this buy it because they don't have space for a long bed.

I tried once with infeed and outfeed rollers. Manageable but not perfect and still awkward to do.

Luckily I got a track saw now :D
Newbie
Nov 26, 2003
84 posts
33 upvotes
Markham
Jon Lai wrote: I agree but this shouldn't be a complaint about the jointer considering this is a benchtop jointer! People who buy this buy it because they don't have space for a long bed.

I tried once with infeed and outfeed rollers. Manageable but not perfect and still awkward to do.

Luckily I got a track saw now :D
Well, I'm not really complaining about the jointer per se but I think it's important to point out that the virtues of a typical spiral/helical cutter are lost on this one and people may see this jointer and think they are getting better performance in figured wood. In actuality, it isn't likely to do any better than straight knives. What *IS* a benefit with indexable cutters is their longevity (if they are carbide) and their ease of setup (no small jointer like this is going to be using Tersa knives). Anyway, not trying to knock the jointer for being anything beyond what it is.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4265 posts
1508 upvotes
WFH
Jon Lai wrote: I agree but this shouldn't be a complaint about the jointer considering this is a benchtop jointer! People who buy this buy it because they don't have space for a long bed.

I tried once with infeed and outfeed rollers. Manageable but not perfect and still awkward to do.

Luckily I got a track saw now :D
I suspect that most people buy it because it's considerably cheaper than a stationary long bed.
Charlton wrote: Well, I'm not really complaining about the jointer per se but I think it's important to point out that the virtues of a typical spiral/helical cutter are lost on this one and people may see this jointer and think they are getting better performance in figured wood. In actuality, it isn't likely to do any better than straight knives. What *IS* a benefit with indexable cutters is their longevity (if they are carbide) and their ease of setup (no small jointer like this is going to be using Tersa knives). Anyway, not trying to knock the jointer for being anything beyond what it is.
I suspect that because the knifes are only cutting about 1" total width at any one time it's likely to produce less surface ripple, vibration and is less demanding on the motor, cutter head and other drive components.
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9961 posts
5246 upvotes
Paris
Virtually the same unit was sold under the Ryobi and Craftsman names for years. I have the Ryobi version (Jp155) and my buddy the craftsman. His craftsman the fence is very pointy and I have skinned my knuckles a few times on it. The Ryobi has holes for wing extensions and has a variable speed motor (Which is useful). My only real issues with these machines is the length of the bed and the pita of changing blades and making sure they are all even.
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
45335 posts
5880 upvotes
Richmond Hill
Jerico wrote: Virtually the same unit was sold under the Ryobi and Craftsman names for years. I have the Ryobi version (Jp155) and my buddy the craftsman. His craftsman the fence is very pointy and I have skinned my knuckles a few times on it. The Ryobi has holes for wing extensions and has a variable speed motor (Which is useful). My only real issues with these machines is the length of the bed and the pita of changing blades and making sure they are all even.
Same with the King. Especially when I edge joint width boards and can't see where the fence is... :(
Deal Fanatic
Jan 25, 2007
9961 posts
5246 upvotes
Paris
Jon Lai wrote: Same with the King. Especially when I edge joint width boards and can't see where the fence is... :(
I watched the video and the fence looks identical. Was using my friends on the weekend as I have a small chip in my blades and could not understand why my walnut was red. Then I saw my hand and assumed I had lost it there was so much blood. From a tiny little scratch I can no longer see on Tuesday evening (from Saturday)
Deal Expert
May 30, 2005
45335 posts
5880 upvotes
Richmond Hill
Jerico wrote: I watched the video and the fence looks identical. Was using my friends on the weekend as I have a small chip in my blades and could not understand why my walnut was red. Then I saw my hand and assumed I had lost it there was so much blood. From a tiny little scratch I can no longer see on Tuesday evening (from Saturday)
More than once I had blood on my hands (not just from this but from other things as well, mostly tiny cuts fortunately) and only found out when I saw it on the wood. Never understood why I didn't feel it before seeing it. Before getting into woodworking I would most definitely feel it before I see it :shrugs:

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