Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon.ca] Kingdom Hearts 3 for 24.99$ (Ps4)

  • Last Updated:
  • Nov 15th, 2019 8:11 am
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14501 posts
4661 upvotes
Montreal
Styleman wrote: So... It's very possible we will see the $20 price point in Canada for Black Friday.
I think that's pretty well a guarantee, and a lot of similar-vintage PS4/XB1 games will be at the traditional $19.99 BF sale price.
Official Response from Dollarama Management:

Dollarama has a no exchange/no refund policy, and as a result, all sales are final. This information can be found on the screen of each check-out/point-of-sale in our stores as well as on each receipt.
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14501 posts
4661 upvotes
Montreal
Styleman wrote: If all this DLC was free in the first place, these companies would see much higher day 1 purchases and early adopters.
I think one reason developers keep pulling the same DLC scam, even after all the bad press, are game services that offer the base version for free, like PS Plus, GwG, etc, - that way the company has a guaranteed future revenue stream from all the freebee customers that may buy the DLC.
Official Response from Dollarama Management:

Dollarama has a no exchange/no refund policy, and as a result, all sales are final. This information can be found on the screen of each check-out/point-of-sale in our stores as well as on each receipt.
Sr. Member
Dec 31, 2006
768 posts
290 upvotes
eb games also had it for this price a couple of weeks ago
Member
User avatar
Dec 27, 2012
239 posts
329 upvotes
Thello wrote: Would you prefer games were $99.99? Because that would still be cheaper than what they were 20 years ago. AAA games are too cheap and the money has to come from somewhere. There are just better and worse ways to implement that monetization.
The $99 argument of snes games (and to a lesser extent n64 games) is baseless because a large part of that cost came from the fact that you were paying for the hardware inside the cartridge. some games utilized special chips that made the cost even higher, in addition to save memory. this is what made some games more expensive than others, particularly games in the rpg genre. that tech was cutting edge at the time so the price points of various snes carts was justified. that price also included manuals, etc. these days, a blu ray disc costs pennies so to say a game has any business reaching that price point is pretty crazy, especially since MOST games are not complete on disc and eventually get features and dlc for additional cost a few months later! even at the $80 price point, every game should come included with a season pass and all the content. if anything, publishers should make a cheaper tier -- let us say $60 -- which doesn't include the dlc and allow the cutomer to decide what is best for their needs. should ps5 games go up $10 from what they are now (plus tax) we will surpass the $100 price point on new releases lol... i mean, all that does is deter me from buying on launch day and wait for sales which is the opposite effect the big publishers want.
Member
Dec 19, 2006
459 posts
409 upvotes
Burnaby
xristophoros wrote: The $99 argument of snes games (and to a lesser extent n64 games) is baseless because a large part of that cost came from the fact that you were paying for the hardware inside the cartridge. some games utilized special chips that made the cost even higher, in addition to save memory. this is what made some games more expensive than others, particularly games in the rpg genre. that tech was cutting edge at the time so the price points of various snes carts was justified. that price also included manuals, etc. these days, a blu ray disc costs pennies so to say a game has any business reaching that price point is pretty crazy, especially since MOST games are not complete on disc and eventually get features and dlc for additional cost a few months later! even at the $80 price point, every game should come included with a season pass and all the content. if anything, publishers should make a cheaper tier -- let us say $60 -- which doesn't include the dlc and allow the cutomer to decide what is best for their needs. should ps5 games go up $10 from what they are now (plus tax) we will surpass the $100 price point on new releases lol... i mean, all that does is deter me from buying on launch day and wait for sales which is the opposite effect the big publishers want.
No, the point remains. Development teams in the 90s were frequently no more than a couple dozen people. Regardless of the cost to produce a cartridge, the budget for most games was infinitesimally smaller by virtue of not having a thousand people working on it. And that's forgetting very basic features that we take for granted today like a fully voiced script and mixing for surround.

It's one thing if DLC is a genuine omission (like EA's old model of including one-time use codes for party members in Dragon Age and Mass Effect 3) and another if it's extraneous (cosmetics and / or just about every cutting room floor trash 'bonus mission'). Likewise if it's an expansion, but the model has changed. Nobody would've accused Starcraft Brood War of being cut content.

Truly, ninety nine times out of a hundred, DLC adds very little of value. My time is valuable and more is rarely better. I'm happy for developers to sell DLC if it means they can keep making games and I'm happy to continue not to buy it when hundreds of thousands of rubes are willing to foot that bill.
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14501 posts
4661 upvotes
Montreal
xristophoros wrote: The $99 argument of snes games (and to a lesser extent n64 games) is baseless because a large part of that cost came from the fact that you were paying for the hardware inside the cartridge.
And that consoles were much cheaper relative to the cost of software - they pretty well gave consoles away in return for $80-$100 games, which drove the rental business. And consoles would go on sale constantly after the big release - I still have our old SNES that was bought on BD still with a $135 "SALE" price tag on it. The MSRP on the N64 and Gamecube was only $199,

Now they launch consoles at $600 and games at $79, making the console a much higher investment compared to the software. .
Official Response from Dollarama Management:

Dollarama has a no exchange/no refund policy, and as a result, all sales are final. This information can be found on the screen of each check-out/point-of-sale in our stores as well as on each receipt.
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14501 posts
4661 upvotes
Montreal
junglemage666 wrote: No it isn't, go to any ebgames, I've gone to 5 this week and they always have one, just ask the cashier if u don't see one, it's probably in a drawer
It's down to $39 again and I just checked - out of 20 stores, 4 have it in stock and all of those are single-gutted copies.
Official Response from Dollarama Management:

Dollarama has a no exchange/no refund policy, and as a result, all sales are final. This information can be found on the screen of each check-out/point-of-sale in our stores as well as on each receipt.
Deal Fanatic
Feb 11, 2007
8719 posts
3087 upvotes
Those are completely different eras.

Almost all SNES, Sega, Sega CD, Neo Geo, Panasonic 3DO-era games sold at $80 - $100 CAD and were so short they could be beat in less than 1 hour.
Many had levels or sprites that were just palette swaps of previous levels.

Panasonic 3DO also launched at $699 USD
and Neo Geo at $650 with games that cost $100-300 each. Those would be over $1000 USD for the console alone with inflation. They never caught on because
of price point and mostly because Nintendo and Sega had better exclusives.

Min wage in Canada was frozen at $6.85 from 1995-2003 with the average Canadian earning $19,000 a year in Salary in 1994.
Now in 2019, the average Canadian makes $55,000 a year in salary.

A house in 1995 costs way less than the same house in 2019.
With inflation, games are way cheaper to buy now than ever before.

JackWhyte wrote: And that consoles were much cheaper relative to the cost of software - they pretty well gave consoles away in return for $80-$100 games, which drove the rental business. And consoles would go on sale constantly after the big release - I still have our old SNES that was bought on BD still with a $135 "SALE" price tag on it. The MSRP on the N64 and Gamecube was only $199,

Now they launch consoles at $600 and games at $79, making the console a much higher investment compared to the software. .
zott23 wrote: Huh, I picked it up a few days ago but haven't opened it. If they removed all the Final Fantasy characters I'll just return it, that was the whole hook that got me to enjoy the series.

Edit: Good price though, not a knock on the OP! Just not for me if it isn't full of cameos by FF characters.
There are no Final Fantasy character cameos in KH3 which is dissapointing.
Overall the game is still good but not as great as it should have been. This series really needed to hire different writers.

Some other negatives:
- I find Donald Duck's grating voice and Goofy's oafish voice annoying to listen to. It would have been better
to have different sidekicks instead of Donald, Goofy and Mickey Mouse at the forefront most of the time.
Deal Guru
Jul 19, 2012
14501 posts
4661 upvotes
Montreal
XFactor11 wrote: With inflation, games are way cheaper to buy now than ever before.
Exactly my point and you're just looking at the dollar amount when you should be looking at the relation between the price of consoles and the price of games. Don't get fixated on dollars (and bizarre house prices driven entirely by foreign investment and immigration) or failed outliers like 3DO's priced at levels only 0.0001% of the population could afford, and instead look at the mass market ratio between the two.

Over time, that relative pricing matrix has shifted drastically, from where manufacturers were giving away consoles (relatively speaking) with constant sales and producing $100 games, to where the consoles are now significantly higher priced than the games.

I remember reading articles back during the PS1/Xbox era and they stated that "lost game rental income" was the main reason for the shift. When a single game cost almost as much as a console, rental outlets naturally flourished, but once they lowered game MSRPs to 10% (or less) of the price of a console (with the PS3 launch) it no longer made any economic sense to rent games. Then came the trade-in phase....
Official Response from Dollarama Management:

Dollarama has a no exchange/no refund policy, and as a result, all sales are final. This information can be found on the screen of each check-out/point-of-sale in our stores as well as on each receipt.

Top

Thread Information

There is currently 1 user viewing this thread. (0 members and 1 guest)