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Leviton 20A GFCI receptacles - 3 pack - $46.80 - $15.60 each

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  • Jan 25th, 2022 1:09 am
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
Feb 2, 2010
66 posts
257 upvotes

[Amazon.ca] Leviton 20A GFCI receptacles - 3 pack - $46.80 - $15.60 each

A good deal on Leviton 20A GFCI receptacles. These are around $22 each and seem not easy to get from the big box stores around me at the moment, possibly due to global materials shortages?

Amazon does have a few cheaper choices however I have never heard of "Dewenwils" or "Electek" or "Bestten" or "Anko" brands and therefore would not trust them to protect lives...
30 replies
Member
Feb 3, 2012
455 posts
316 upvotes
T.O.
I picked up the Leviton 15A GFCI 3 pack a couple of years ago from Amazon to replace the old GFCI outlets in the bathrooms. The old ones were Electek GFCI with the red and black reset and test buttons. One of them had the active indicator flickering. I replaced them with the Leviton and so far it's worked fine and I personally think look much better.
Newbie
May 18, 2021
56 posts
52 upvotes
Not sure on price, but looks good! Just a warning that these are 20amp receptacles, therefore should be wired accordingly. I.E. 12awg wire and a 20amp breaker.

Edit; also not tamper resistant. These are fairly limited use in Ontario. Not to say you can't /shouldn't use them as a home gamer, but by electrical code you will be limited on where you can use them.
Sr. Member
Jul 19, 2015
658 posts
695 upvotes
London, ON
DMPimm wrote: Not sure on price, but looks good! Just a warning that these are 20amp receptacles, therefore should be wired accordingly. I.E. 12awg wire and a 20amp breaker.

Edit; also not tamper resistant. These are fairly limited use in Ontario. Not to say you can't /shouldn't use them as a home gamer, but by electrical code you will be limited on where you can use them.
In the details or days tamper resistant. "conntains 3 non tamper-resistant GFCI's
Newbie
May 18, 2021
56 posts
52 upvotes
xFRUGALITYx wrote: In the details or days tamper resistant. "conntains 3 non tamper-resistant GFCI's
Yes, most outlets need to be tamper resistant according to code. New houses will likely only have one or two non tamper-resistant, like in the ones from OP, in the whole house.
Deal Guru
Apr 11, 2006
10604 posts
4572 upvotes
Mississauga
xFRUGALITYx wrote: In the details or days tamper resistant. "conntains 3 non tamper-resistant GFCI's
"Non-tamper resistant" meaning they are not tamper-resistant

You can also tell from the photos, you don't see the "TR" on the face.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 23, 2004
2215 posts
715 upvotes
Montreal
SquadG wrote: You can use 20A receptacle to replace your 15A. The circuit breaker and wire are made for 15A so it's all good. The 15A receptacle is spec'd at 20A passthrough anyway.
I think you got it the opposite way.
You can install a 15A receptacle on a 20A circuit, but not a 20A receptacle on a 15A circuit.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Nov 24, 2012
1708 posts
1834 upvotes
Metro Vancouver
SquadG wrote: Oh I know it's not legal but it can be done and it's not dangerous at all since the breaker will turn off.
Sorry, but this is dangerous to suggest as the 20A outlet could easily lead users to think that it is OK to run a 20A device on the circuit. Not only would it lead to frequent breaker resets, but you also run the risk that before the breaker cuts power, some part of the circuit overheats.
Deal Expert
Mar 25, 2005
22189 posts
3014 upvotes
SquadG wrote: You can use 20A receptacle to replace your 15A. The circuit breaker and wire are made for 15A so it's all good. The 15A receptacle is spec'd at 20A passthrough anyway.
Don't do this, it's stupid. A 5 20P is for a 20amp circuit, wire and breaker. Allowing someone to plug a 20amp load into a 15amp circuit means you're relying on the breaker to prevent a fire.
Newbie
May 18, 2021
56 posts
52 upvotes
Kasakato wrote: Don't do this, it's stupid. A 5 20P is for a 20amp circuit, wire and breaker. Allowing someone to plug a 20amp load into a 15amp circuit means you're relying on the breaker to prevent a fire.
Have heard of a few horror stories of breakers failing and being able to weld with the circuit. My own experience; my journeyman at the time blew a hole in his cutters on a live circuit, then said it had to be dead now and took mine and blew a hole in mine...
Deal Expert
Mar 25, 2005
22189 posts
3014 upvotes
DMPimm wrote: Have heard of a few horror stories of breakers failing and being able to weld with the circuit. My own experience; my journeyman at the time blew a hole in his cutters on a live circuit, then said it had to be dead now and took mine and blew a hole in mine...
FPE/Pacific, Challenge or Zinsco by chance?
Deal Guru
Apr 11, 2006
10604 posts
4572 upvotes
Mississauga
What is an example of a 20-amp device?

I feel like all the breakers for regular and GFCI plugs on my panel are 15A.
Jr. Member
Feb 12, 2017
144 posts
179 upvotes
kenchau wrote: What is an example of a 20-amp device?

I feel like all the breakers for regular and GFCI plugs on my panel are 15A.
Refrigerator, toasters, blenders, and microwave just to name a few.
You can also plug any 15amp devices in a 20amp receptacle.


HTH.
Deal Guru
Apr 11, 2006
10604 posts
4572 upvotes
Mississauga
althegreat wrote: Refrigerator, toasters, blenders, and microwave just to name a few.
You can also plug any 15amp devices in a 20amp receptacle.


HTH.
Refrigerators always have a dedicated spot and outlet, so I'm not even counting that.

So you're saying common household countertop small appliances? No way majority of people are thinking these are 20amps and my outlets are 15amps, it's going to be a problem. Why do we not experience more issues?
Member
May 30, 2010
336 posts
515 upvotes
Common use for these are kitchen counter plugs around a sink. They are 20a gfci but usaully only 2 per house.

You may not replace a 15a gfci plug with one of these. It is an extra horizontal slot that invites someone to plug in a higher draw appliance.
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
Feb 2, 2010
66 posts
257 upvotes
DMPimm wrote: Have heard of a few horror stories of breakers failing and being able to weld with the circuit. My own experience; my journeyman at the time blew a hole in his cutters on a live circuit, then said it had to be dead now and took mine and blew a hole in mine...
It's not necessarily a failing breaker that can cause this scenario either, a breaker needs to sustain a certain load for an X amount of time (as per designed trip curve specifications) before its' trip mechanism opens the circuit. A breaker is really designed for a sustained overload condition, if the circuit is overloaded intermittently (arcing) it will not have enough time to heat up internally to trip.

An AFCI (arc fault circuit interrupter) is a device specifically designed for such high energy intermittent circuit faults, which are arguably more dangerous to have (start a fire) rather than a branch circuit overload.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Oct 19, 2003
20087 posts
8009 upvotes
Toronto (Bloor West …
I've been searching for 20A GFCI with USB-C charging built in for a long time, still doesn't seem to exist. Want to get rid of the ugly charging crap all over the kitchen island... anybody know something I don't?

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