Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon Canada] LifeStraw Personal Water Filter for Hiking, Camping, Travel Amazon.ca $19.99 Warm Deal

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  • Aug 14th, 2019 2:51 am
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Sep 22, 2012
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feminazi wrote:
Jul 11th, 2019 6:47 pm
It is $17.49 on Amazon.com so with currency conversion this is cheaper. It is a warm deal but not a hot one at 23% off. 3x Camel says the lowest-ever price has been $15.98 so about four dollars cheaper.
Amazon and sellers seem to have caught onto price trackers like Camel^3 and turned it against us. Kind of like Dealerships and invoice pricing?

Deal of the Day (?), Lightning Deals and Coupons don't appear to be tracked and are frequently used to provide lower prices without affecting list price on trackers, making it feel like a better deal than it is.

I bought this around Prime Day 2018 for $12.99
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Oct 13, 2016
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In a galaxy far far …
I just don’t get this product.
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Apr 17, 2015
262 posts
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Toronto, ON
How does the contiki water bottle with filters compare? It's $15 USD.

"Removes 99.95% of waterborne bacteria, including coliforms; 99.97% of waterborne protozoan parasites, including Giardia & Cryptosporidium; and virtually all heavy metals and viruses"

https://contiki-shop.com/product/comple ... ottle-set/
[OP]
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Jul 8, 2005
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craftsman wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 1:29 am
I have to say about the price is: LifeStraw does 1500 L per $15 unit (or about $0.01 per litre) while the Sawyer Mini does 370,000 L per $17 unit (or basically too small to count). Plus if I was taking a water filter into the backcountry and that's my only source for water, I would pack a spare.
Fair enough, but is there any proof that Sawyer's filter will filter anywhere near as much water as it claims to? I thought I read awhile ago that Sawyer makes great products but that their claims for the amount of water their products could filter was hyperbolic and that they needed to tone those claims down a lot.

I don't think anyone would disagree that Sawyer makes great products and for something as important as water it is probably a good idea to go for something that is superb and that it is worth paying a premium for it.
[OP]
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Jul 8, 2005
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rugerty100 wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 2:09 am
Amazon and sellers seem to have caught onto price trackers like Camel^3 and turned it against us. Kind of like Dealerships and invoice pricing?

Deal of the Day (?), Lightning Deals and Coupons don't appear to be tracked and are frequently used to provide lower prices without affecting list price on trackers, making it feel like a better deal than it is.

I bought this around Prime Day 2018 for $12.99
I saw on Amazon's Prime Day 2019 landing page that the Lifestraw was the product that Amazon Canada sold the most of or was most popular or something like that. Getting it for $12.99 would do that. At that price it is a very, very hot deal!

I didn't know that Camel 3x doesn't track deals etc.!

I wonder if the Lifestraw, Befree and Sawyer products will be on sale during Prime Days this year?

We will be back country camping (small chance of cell reception?) when the sale is on so it is highly unlikely that we will find out until afterwards.
[OP]
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Badbrad wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 3:18 am
I just don’t get this product.
You use it like a straw and it filters out bacteria, protozoa and turbidity in the water you are filtering. It is a pretty good filter and cheaper than the competition at times but there are better filters, as indicated above.
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Mar 15, 2005
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Also look at Sawyer products, it was recommended last time a Lifestraw thread was posted.
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Oct 13, 2016
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In a galaxy far far …
feminazi wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 10:43 am
You use it like a straw and it filters out bacteria, protozoa and turbidity in the water you are filtering. It is a pretty good filter and cheaper than the competition at times but there are better filters, as indicated above.
Thanks. I'd likely vomit looking at the algae or lose my balance and tumble into the water as a bent down on one knee to use this thing.
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Mar 6, 2003
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the Emergency Preparedness side of me wants to order stuff like this, but the most outdoor adventure I go nowadays is trekking down to my local MEC store and climbing over the rock garden landscaping they have in the front.
RFD is not just about saving money, it's about the thrill of the hunt and not paying full price like Joe Shmoe did. This applies to everyday items as well as high end items that I don't really need.
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Apr 26, 2019
184 posts
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Do all you guys live up in the mountains? Who even uses these.. lmao actually its hilarious thinking about some guy trying to use this on a lake and getting violent diarrhea afterwards..ahhhhhh shouldve just dehydrated to death!
[OP]
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Jul 8, 2005
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Who actually uses these? Hikers, travelers, back country campers and yes they filter out bacteria and protozoa. Some of them can filter out 99.9999% of them which is pretty impressive when you think about it. If you don't travel or camp overnight anywhere that doesn't have potable water you probably don't need these products. I personally think that there aren't many people that need them for emergency preparedness in Southern Canada but some people may need them or they may want to have them on hand just in case.

I am not thrilled at the idea of using a straw at the edge of a puddle or a pond etc. either but where we are going there will be abundant lakes.
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Jan 27, 2006
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k9fire wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 7:02 am
How does the contiki water bottle with filters compare? It's $15 USD.

"Removes 99.95% of waterborne bacteria, including coliforms; 99.97% of waterborne protozoan parasites, including Giardia & Cryptosporidium; and virtually all heavy metals and viruses"

https://contiki-shop.com/product/comple ... ottle-set/
I wouldn't trust any water filter that doesn't spell out the filter size... But if you use Contiki's measurement standards, the Sawyer Mini does the following:
removing 99.99999% of all bacteria, such as salmonella, cholera and E.coli, removing 99.9999% of all protozoa (such as giardia and cryptosporidium), and removing 100% of microplastics.
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Jan 27, 2006
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feminazi wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 10:38 am
Fair enough, but is there any proof that Sawyer's filter will filter anywhere near as much water as it claims to? I thought I read awhile ago that Sawyer makes great products but that their claims for the amount of water their products could filter was hyperbolic and that they needed to tone those claims down a lot.

I don't think anyone would disagree that Sawyer makes great products and for something as important as water it is probably a good idea to go for something that is superb and that it is worth paying a premium for it.
Here are two tests on the Sawyer website -

Sawyer MINI Testing Report
Sawyer Hollow Fiber Filter Strength Test

The first test pertains to the filtering capabilities of the Mini in regards to how well it does in the removal of micro-organisms. The second test shows how strong the filter membrane is in comparison to other filters.

As for paying a premium for it, you aren't. The price difference is mainly because one is sold as a single and the other is sold as a two pack.... Even if you discount the durability of the Sawyer Mini to 10% of Sawyer's numbers (ie instead of 370,000 L, we use the 37,000 L instead), the numbers are still vastly superior to the LifeStraw's 1,500 L.
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Jan 27, 2006
11196 posts
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Vancouver, BC
feminazi wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 3:01 pm
Who actually uses these? Hikers, travelers, back country campers and yes they filter out bacteria and protozoa. Some of them can filter out 99.9999% of them which is pretty impressive when you think about it. If you don't travel or camp overnight anywhere that doesn't have potable water you probably don't need these products. I personally think that there aren't many people that need them for emergency preparedness in Southern Canada but some people may need them or they may want to have them on hand just in case.

I am not thrilled at the idea of using a straw at the edge of a puddle or a pond etc. either but where we are going there will be abundant lakes.
Don't forget that these are excellent in an emergency preparedness kit for situations where potable water is in short supply.
[OP]
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Jul 8, 2005
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craftsman wrote:
Jul 13th, 2019 7:02 pm
Here are two tests on the Sawyer website -

Sawyer MINI Testing Report
Sawyer Hollow Fiber Filter Strength Test

The first test pertains to the filtering capabilities of the Mini in regards to how well it does in the removal of micro-organisms. The second test shows how strong the filter membrane is in comparison to other filters.

As for paying a premium for it, you aren't. The price difference is mainly because one is sold as a single and the other is sold as a two pack.... Even if you discount the durability of the Sawyer Mini to 10% of Sawyer's numbers (ie instead of 370,000 L, we use the 37,000 L instead), the numbers are still vastly superior to the LifeStraw's 1,500 L.
I think our next water filtration device will have to be a Sawyer!! The Befree Katadyn looks like it filters quickly and really well and the 3L bag it comes with is quite convenient. If I see a really sharp deal on a Sawyer filter though I think it is well worth picking one up instead of the Lifestraw!

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