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Amazon.ca

Lodge Cast Iron 14in Pizza Pan $79.08

  • Last Updated:
  • Jun 4th, 2020 11:24 am
Newbie
Oct 3, 2014
74 posts
64 upvotes
Toronto, ON
georgep wrote: Why would cast iron be any hotter than brick or stone if they are both heated to 600 or higher? Its about thermal stability AND heat transfer. I ended up with steel a while ago after reviewing countless articles and videos, including one where there was a comparison with stone, cast iron, steel and copper - steel was the hands down winner for home oven use (just wish it was lighter as my steel weighs about 26lbs).

And not sure what oven you use, but I cook pizza just under the broil coils - 4min at 550 using "Bake" setting and then "Hi" broil for 2-2.5min and done. The broil coils on my oven heat immediately.
And traditionally they didn't have steel available (too costly) and stone and brick was free (can make or excavate yourself)
Jr. Member
Nov 12, 2006
106 posts
13 upvotes
For those of you that got a steel, may I ask where? And was it significantly more than this lodge pan? I have two pizza stones now, but finding they work great in the Big Green Egg (less so in the regular oven).

THanks!
Deal Addict
Aug 16, 2015
1131 posts
637 upvotes
Toronto, ON
jrshopper wrote: Steel was the best thing I ever purchased, hands down. Last summer we set bricks on the gas grill with the steel on top (bakingsteel.com has a video and/or post detailing) and set the pizzas right on the grill. Awesome for when we didn't want to turn the oven on to 550 degrees for a couple of hours.


I don't have two....yet.
Sorry, the pizzas went straight on the grates? No sagging issues? Have a Weber Summit 670 and the spacing seems pretty close, but I would have been a bit nervous to put the pie right on the grill...
Sr. Member
Jul 11, 2009
815 posts
733 upvotes
Toronto
georgep wrote: Why would cast iron be any hotter than brick or stone if they are both heated to 600 or higher? Its about thermal stability AND heat transfer. I ended up with steel a while ago after reviewing countless articles and videos, including one where there was a comparison with stone, cast iron, steel and copper - steel was the hands down winner for home oven use (just wish it was lighter as my steel weighs about 26lbs).

And not sure what oven you use, but I cook pizza just under the broil coils - 4min at 550 using "Bake" setting and then "Hi" broil for 2-2.5min and done. The broil coils on my oven heat immediately.
cast iron could be the same temperature as a brick or stone, but could have more thermal energy if it has a higher specific heat capacity and/or if it is heavier than the brick or stone.
also if the cast iron pan is black and the brick or stone is not, it would absorb radiant heat faster.

my guess for the oven lining of stone vs cast iron is, it'd be a pita to construct an oven lining outta cast iron relative to stones, and if it ever rusts, it'd be a pita to clean.
Newbie
Apr 24, 2012
96 posts
37 upvotes
CALGARY
fightbriz wrote: Why do we always hear of pizza stones, yet we don't hear about cast iron pizza pans? Cast iron should be much hotter than a stone, no?

How about outdoor brick ovens, wouldn't a cast iron surface be hotter than the brick (or is it tile?) surface? Why don't they line those brick ovens with a plate of cast iron?
Castiron is not the end all be all that some people think it is, Cast iron is great at heat retention and after seasoning being nonstick (look up carbon steel pans much better for everyday pans) which is why it is used for things like searing meats and other cooking where heat retention is important. But what cast iron is not great at is heating evenly, so for things like baking this is more important, you want even heating and you can sacrifice some heat retention. So people use baking stones and baking steels.

also cast iron is super cheap to manufacture
Sr. Member
May 17, 2011
675 posts
630 upvotes
Toronto
georgep wrote: Sorry, the pizzas went straight on the grates? No sagging issues? Have a Weber Summit 670 and the spacing seems pretty close, but I would have been a bit nervous to put the pie right on the grill...
Straight onto the grates. Build a ledge for the steel with bricks and place on top. Preheat all knobs on full for an hour (maybe less, can't quite remember). Oil the grates, turn off the burners right over where the pizza goes and launch onto it. We normally are doing several so we finish the first one off on the top of the steel when it's time to launch the second. Works great!

edit to add -
- note that this does not tell you to shut the heat off when launching but he included that in his instagram of this video. If you don't then you will have charcoal crust. Ask me how I know. ;-)
Last edited by jrshopper on May 22nd, 2020 11:39 am, edited 2 times in total.
Sr. Member
May 17, 2011
675 posts
630 upvotes
Toronto
tacopower wrote: For those of you that got a steel, may I ask where? And was it significantly more than this lodge pan? I have two pizza stones now, but finding they work great in the Big Green Egg (less so in the regular oven).

THanks!
I got mine directly from bakingsteel.com and shipped to a relative in the US that was driving up, so free shipping. However they apparently are launching or just launched a Canadian distribution to cut down on shipping/duty.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 22, 2014
3031 posts
2511 upvotes
GTA Ontario
ElvisD735799 wrote: Or go to lowes and get an extra large travertine tile for $10. Good to bake bread with too
I wouldn't recommend it:
- It doesn't have the same density as iron or even high temperature ceramic or soapstone and therefore won't have the same high thermal inertia - which is the whole point of a baking stone;
- It's soft relative to other stones and is more likely to break from the handling;
- It's got much lower thermal shock resistance and is more likely to break from the heating and cooling;
- It's a porous stone and will absorb more moisture from your food than other stones will, which increases its chance of cracking from the heat;
- If it's not porous it's because it's one that's been backfilled with epoxy to create smoother surface, and when heated its off-gasses may be toxic.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Aug 24, 2009
700 posts
319 upvotes
Mississauga
I have a book for pizzas on the grill - you put olive oil on one side of the dough and put it right on the grill direct at 450 for like 5 min. Take off, flip over and then put your sauce and stuff on the cooked size. Then put it back on the grill Indirect for like 12-15 depending on the grill and the pizza. Works good but the pizzas won’t look like they’re ready for a photo op - if you care. :)
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User avatar
Jan 22, 2014
3031 posts
2511 upvotes
GTA Ontario
Cashforlife wrote: Any reason you would want to buy this instead of the AmazonBasics one, for half the price?

https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B073Q8LMLT/ref ... NrPXRydWU=
- Size: Both 15" outside width, but the Amazon has a thinner bottom and taller sides that slant in an extra 1/4" per side, making it 1/2" smaller cooking surface (not a big deal really)
- Thermal mass: The lodge is 4.33 kg vs Amazon's 3.05 kg, about 42% more iron to load up heat and transfer it to your pizza (the whole point)
- Surface texture: Both are rough cast, but the Lodge at least has the potential to be sanded smooth, and with that bulletproof seasoning method will be fairly non-stick. The Amazon has special ridges for holding on to your pizza so you can't slide it off, and for blocking your attempt at scraping it off with a spatula (actually I have no idea what they're for; just guessing it's to reduce weight to make it easier to use despite making it less useful).
- And the Lodge has nicer, smoother handles (not a big deal).
Member
User avatar
Jun 12, 2017
486 posts
567 upvotes
Montreal (QC)
Don't do what this guy did. He removed a part of his oven's locking mechanism and he put it on auto clean mode to reach temperatures above 800 degrees.



He used a steel sheet and it burned the bottom of the pizza.
Member
Jan 27, 2011
447 posts
286 upvotes
fightbriz wrote: Right, but why is the traditional surface of a wood fired oven brick or stone, why not line it with a cast iron plate, or a large steel plate, that would be hotter than brick or stone right? Or perhaps you want a hot oven but not necessarily the cooking surface to be super hot?

And even for home use, cast iron would be much better than a pizza stone right? There must be one without a lip out there.. Like a pizza steel but made of cast iron... But i guess at that point might as well just get a steel...

Regarding your 2 steel setup, you're saying have one top, one bottom, preheated like an hour at max heat (NOT on broil, but regular BAKE right?). You launch onto the one below, about 5mins? Then you transfer it to the one above to broil like 2mins? What i don't understand is, when you transfer to the top steel, that's when you switch the oven to broil mode right? But the broil coils will take like 10min to fully activate, much longer than the 2min or whatever that it takes to broil, so how does that work?

Also, on Bake mode, are the top coils activated? Or only bottom ones? On Broil mode i assume only top coils are activated.
I think because they were mostly built before steel was cheap and readily available. Now there is a fetishization of "authentic" Neapolitan pizza including the oven. The stone looks nicer, imo and it's a more porous surface, so some of that might change the texture. I'm not convinced, personally.

There are steels out there. The easiest, imo, is to have a yard cut it for you. The forum link that I posted has advice on that, and a lot of pictures of people toying with their setups. Most home ovens are going to cap out at 450-500F, and though they often heat a bit higher than their rating (i use an infrared gun to test surface temps), there's also guidelines on how to hotrod your home oven to get it to heat up even more.

All that said, I have had good results with a stone, a steel, and even just a baking sheet in a pinch. I think the steel is the best of the 3 I've tried. I've cracked 2 pizza stones over the years. In both cases someone melted something on them. I washed them... and the moisture must have done them in. In the case of the second one, i waited a week between use - but it still cracked.

In my old oven the broiler came on right away. So it was very quick on the top and just to get the kind of browning I wanted. Sometimes I'd just forego that step. My advice is to just practice a lot. Homemade dough was the biggest difference maker in my pizza making though. I used to get dough from a local pizzeria. Even now I'm growing dissatisfied with my recipe and might start again from the ground up.

The good news is that there are lots of resources out there to help speed things along.

Cheers!
Sr. Member
May 17, 2011
675 posts
630 upvotes
Toronto
soupman wrote: .... The forum link that I posted has advice on that, and a lot of pictures of people toying with their setups. ...
.

Cheers!
Forum link? I can't find it in your previous post. I've never been able to find a yard that would cut me a steel, so interested if the cost is significantly cheaper than ordering another baking steel.
Member
Jan 29, 2020
494 posts
467 upvotes
OakAged wrote: - Size: Both 15" outside width, but the Amazon has a thinner bottom and taller sides that slant in an extra 1/4" per side, making it 1/2" smaller cooking surface (not a big deal really)
- Thermal mass: The lodge is 4.33 kg vs Amazon's 3.05 kg, about 42% more iron to load up heat and transfer it to your pizza (the whole point)
- Surface texture: Both are rough cast, but the Lodge at least has the potential to be sanded smooth, and with that bulletproof seasoning method will be fairly non-stick. The Amazon has special ridges for holding on to your pizza so you can't slide it off, and for blocking your attempt at scraping it off with a spatula (actually I have no idea what they're for; just guessing it's to reduce weight to make it easier to use despite making it less useful).
- And the Lodge has nicer, smoother handles (not a big deal).
Yabbut 240 reviews on amazon.com, overwhelmingly positive. People seem pretty happy with the Amazonbasics one.
Jr. Member
Jul 27, 2009
160 posts
48 upvotes
Toronto
If you are into making pizza regularly, Uuni Koda is the answer
Member
Jan 27, 2011
447 posts
286 upvotes
jrshopper wrote: Forum link? I can't find it in your previous post. I've never been able to find a yard that would cut me a steel, so interested if the cost is significantly cheaper than ordering another baking steel.
Here

I don't know that it's cheaper. Mine was $80 a few years ago in GVA. You can get smaller sizes cut, but I'm not sure the savings are that great. If you don't cook pizza that much something you can take out of the oven easily is probably a better option.
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User avatar
Jan 22, 2014
3031 posts
2511 upvotes
GTA Ontario
Cashforlife wrote: Yabbut 240 reviews on amazon.com, overwhelmingly positive. People seem pretty happy with the Amazonbasics one.
On Amazon.ca:
One three-star review:
"Ok but it will stick ,I bought it for pizza, but it didn’t work,but my husband likes to use it for grill beef."

2 out of the 3 Four-star reviews:
"The grooves are sometimes a real pain to clean (I don't believe they need to be so deep)."
"...the cleaning is a little bit annoying but it’s normal with the way it’s made. I cook bread on it and it works really well for me."

And 13 five-star reviews from people who've never used a different one and are all about how good a cast-iron pizza pan is, nothing specific to this one.

So, yes, you can save $40 and get a pan that will work, and you'll probably find it better than anything you've used before. If you tried both it and the Lodge for a while you'd probably like the Lodge better, but whether that's worth another $40 is totally subjective and up to you. To me, an extra $40 up front for something that's going to make a difference every time I cook a pizza (and clean and dry the pan if needed) for the rest of my life is well worth it, but that's just me. Whichever one you choose I'm sure you'll be happy with it. I'd suggest you strip it and season it really well regardless, so it won't rust and stain your surfaces or dish towel even when you wash it with soap.

Cheers
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User avatar
Jan 22, 2014
3031 posts
2511 upvotes
GTA Ontario
bumbaclot411 wrote: If you are into making pizza regularly, Uuni Koda is the answer
Ooni Koda. Thanks, I'd never heard it, but then I've never had the need to look into outdoor pizza ovens. But this does look interesting and there might be one in my future. This is the best price I found for the 16 in a quick look (it's the only model that came up), but maybe deeper searching can beat it, and there are two other models:

https://www.williams-sonoma.ca/ooni-koda-pizza-ove

Note that Williams Sonoma claims it makes wood-fire pizza. It does not. It's gas only. It looks like they have a wood model with a chimney for wood burning but I didn't look into it.
Jr. Member
Jul 27, 2009
160 posts
48 upvotes
Toronto
OakAged wrote: Ooni Koda. Thanks, I'd never heard it, but then I've never had the need to look into outdoor pizza ovens. But this does look interesting and there might be one in my future. This is the best price I found for the 16 in a quick look (it's the only model that came up), but maybe deeper searching can beat it, and there are two other models:

https://www.williams-sonoma.ca/ooni-koda-pizza-ove

Note that Williams Sonoma claims it makes wood-fire pizza. It does not. It's gas only. It looks like they have a wood model with a chimney for wood burning but I didn't look into it.
I have the original ooni Koda (12 inch pizzas) but I'd go for the bigger Koda 16 (16 inch pizzas). Neither has the ability to convert to wood pellets but I think it would be a huge hassle anyway. In the end the heat is the biggest factor and both can go to 900F+ Pm me if you want my personal experience with this thing. It's pretty awesome

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