Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon.ca] Messermeister Avanta 4-Piece Fine Edge Steak Knife Se - $49.42 (50% off)

  • Last Updated:
  • May 27th, 2020 12:44 am
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 1, 2005
826 posts
189 upvotes
GVR
quazy wrote: Does fine edge have the advantage that it can be sharpened?
Correct, and has advantage of a smoother cut:

-A plain edge knife can give a clean cut when compared to the serrated edge, and for this reason are ideal for cutting steak and other meat without losing flavors or juices.
-The motion of cutting with a plain edge knife is far less effort when compared to a serrated knife, as there’s no need to saw back and forth.

Downside is that you will need to resharpen them sooner versus serrated

https://getyourknives.com/serrated-vs-n ... ed-knives/
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
4267 posts
863 upvotes
whiteGSR wrote: Correct, and has advantage of a smoother cut:

-A plain edge knife can give a clean cut when compared to the serrated edge, and for this reason are ideal for cutting steak and other meat without losing flavors or juices.
-The motion of cutting with a plain edge knife is far less effort when compared to a serrated knife, as there’s no need to saw back and forth.

Downside is that you will need to resharpen them sooner versus serrated

https://getyourknives.com/serrated-vs-n ... ed-knives/
Losing flavour or juices?! You guys are hilarious! If you allow a proper resting period, you'll lose minimal juices, and certainly no flavour. The meat is being cut and going into straight into your mouth to be chewed.

No need to "saw" back and forth? What, do you press the knife through the meat with your straight edge knife?!

I don't really have a preference between serrated or straight edge, it's just, these proclamations are hilarious!

What a bunch of nonsense.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 1, 2005
826 posts
189 upvotes
GVR
Toukolou wrote: Losing flavour or juices?! You guys are hilarious! If you allow a proper resting period, you'll lose minimal juices, and certainly no flavour. The meat is being cut and going into straight into your mouth to be chewed.

No need to "saw" back and forth? What, do you press the knife through the meat with your straight edge knife?!

I don't really have a preference between serrated or straight edge, it's just, these proclamations are hilarious!

What a bunch of nonsense.
Pretty much every single place where i searched for straight edge vs serrated says the same thing though? First link below may answer your question.

https://www.tharwavalleyforge.com/artic ... ated-knife
https://houseofknives.ca/cutlery/kitche ... ak-knives/ (at the top)
https://fnsharp.com/blog/best-steak-kni ... -serrated/
Jr. Member
Aug 25, 2011
175 posts
93 upvotes
LONDON
whiteGSR wrote: Pretty much every single place where i searched for straight edge vs serrated says the same thing though? First link below may answer your question.

https://www.tharwavalleyforge.com/artic ... ated-knife
https://houseofknives.ca/cutlery/kitche ... ak-knives/ (at the top)
https://fnsharp.com/blog/best-steak-kni ... -serrated/
That's a load of bro science. Listen, flavour/texture/juice is already determined by your choice of cut of meat and your cooking technique. It relates to the nature of the muscle fibre and changes in its ability to hold moisture (ex. brining, acidity, enzymatic processes of proteases in certain marinades, heat/Maillard reaction). There is no searing to lock in the juices. The steak largely does not care whether you slice with a serrated knife or a non-serrated knife. What matters here is the cutting experience and maintenance. A serrated knife you typically draw/saw the blade, exerting low effort each motion but sometimes requiring more motions. A straight blade you exert more effort but if sharpened correctly you can cut in one motion. A serrated knife's "valleys" do not ever touch the cutting surface and remain relatively sharp throughout its lifetime, but on the flip side cannot ever be sharpened without specialized equipment. A non-serrated can be highly sharpened, but with repeated use on serveware requires much more frequent sharpening (unless that is, you eat on end grain wood or soft plastic/polymer boards). This is also assuming you don't have some shark's jaw or some poorly designed/made serrated blade and that you aren't producing a wildly jagged/irregular surface from using it.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 4, 2009
4267 posts
863 upvotes
whiteGSR wrote: Pretty much every single place where i searched for straight edge vs serrated says the same thing though? First link below may answer your question.

https://www.tharwavalleyforge.com/artic ... ated-knife
https://houseofknives.ca/cutlery/kitche ... ak-knives/ (at the top)
https://fnsharp.com/blog/best-steak-kni ... -serrated/
Blah, blah, blah. I can find a bunch of articles that say it's a matter of preference. So what.

Don't believe the hype. A proper serrated knife (I'm not talking Ginsu here) will no more "tear" a steak than a straight edge.

And I would rather have a quality serrated that requires zero maintenance than a straight edge that becomes dull after my third steak dinner.
"I'm a bit upset. I've been grab by the back without any alert and lubrification"
Lucky
Newbie
Nov 15, 2018
21 posts
15 upvotes
Just got them and they feel pretty cheap honestly, kinda resembles basic Chinese knives. Very surprised about the high reviews from people, especially for the price.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 1, 2005
826 posts
189 upvotes
GVR
dillonco wrote: Just got them and they feel pretty cheap honestly, kinda resembles basic Chinese knives. Very surprised about the high reviews from people, especially for the price.
That's disappointing to hear, mine won't arrive until the end of the week so I can't comment on them personally.

How well do they cut though?
Newbie
Nov 15, 2018
21 posts
15 upvotes
whiteGSR wrote: That's disappointing to hear, mine won't arrive until the end of the week so I can't comment on them personally.

How well do they cut though?
Oh they came very sharp, so it cut really well. A little worried about how long the sharp edges will last, kinda hoping someone who's used them for a while would chime in.
Deal Addict
Jan 25, 2008
1513 posts
973 upvotes
Montréal
Compared to my Cuisinart knife block steak knives these feel premium and very nice and also sharp
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 1, 2005
826 posts
189 upvotes
GVR
Deal is now dead and price is $78.xx.

Hope everyone that wanted one got it!
Member
Jun 14, 2011
388 posts
328 upvotes
Richmond Hill
dillonco wrote: Oh they came very sharp, so it cut really well. A little worried about how long the sharp edges will last, kinda hoping someone who's used them for a while would chime in.
Have been using mine for almost a year. Still staying sharp, usually 1 motion of pulling back is enough to slice a piece out.
Newbie
Feb 21, 2011
43 posts
34 upvotes
Canada
I received my set today. Impressions for esthetics (I haven't tried cutting anything yet):

- the wood has a very nice natural finish and nice grain.
- it is well-made, but it won't fool anyone in thinking that this is a high-end knife in the $200-a-set-plus category. The devil is in the details (wood and rivets not perfectly flush, for example).
- 'Made in China' appears discretely on the blade.
[OP]
Sr. Member
Jun 1, 2005
826 posts
189 upvotes
GVR
I used mine to eat a rack of lamb the other day:

-Cuts were smooth, without any "noise" or any minor resistance compared to my usual cheapo serrated blades
-Rivets are not completely flush compared to my Wusthof classic handles, but doesn't bother me to the point of noticingit when I'm using the knife
-Blades are apparently sharpened at a 15 degree angle, so I should be able to use my Global Minosharp 2 stage on these
-Overall, I'm very happy for the $12.50/knife.
Newbie
Feb 21, 2011
43 posts
34 upvotes
Canada
I forgot to mention that on the side of the blade it is printed X50CrMoV15. Looking it up, this is standard German steel:
X50CrMoV15 - German steel. Very stain resistant. Other than that not much to speak of. The cryptic X50CrMoV15 stands for 0.5% carbon, the other 15% is composed of 14% or 14.5% of Cr, some Mo and V. X in the name is a an indicator for high alloy steel, 0.5% C content means, by definition X50CrMoV15 isn't a high carbon steel, despite of some marketing claims. In fact it has less C content compared to 440C steel. However, it's plenty tough and resists corrosion well and it is a high alloy steel. If you don't want to bother maintaining your knives this is a good choice. Except for the low edge holding ability of course. In the end, you end up sharpening it a lot more often, so low maintenance statement is really arguable. Used by Wusthof, Victorinox and others in their high end knives. Ref - X50CrMoV15 Steel Composition. If you are interested, you can also read up on DIN And EN Steel Standards Naming Conventions.
Keep in mind that this reference site on knives compares many different kinds of steel, including some pretty exotic varieties. As many will know, steel that is used in very sharp and exotic knives often rusts easily and have an edge that chips easily, so they require specific care. German steel seems to fall in the category of lower hassle while still reasonably sharp steel.

http://zknives.com/knives/kitchen/misc/ ... elp2.shtml

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