Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon Canada] Milton Tire Pressure Gauge $7.22 Add on Item

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 2nd, 2019 6:23 pm
Member
Feb 18, 2007
254 posts
199 upvotes
Toronto
WHITEMARKET wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 9:07 am
Hybrid bikes are very much personal commuter vehicles.
If you're going to nit pick like this, then you would know hybrid bikes also have wider tires that may not go above 50 psi.

Additionally most bike pumps that you use would not require a separate tool to measure PSI as it is BUILT IN TO THE FRIGGIN PUMP.
Member
User avatar
May 22, 2012
395 posts
63 upvotes
Toronto
Was actually looking for a new pressure gauge mine has gone missing. I'm guessing the digital one aren't that accurate?
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
27188 posts
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Ottawa
Phantasm wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 10:07 am
I check my spares before I go on any long trip, and they often need to be topped up a bit when I check. There is no point having a spare in your trunk if it's flat.
I use one of my full size tire as a spare...in the winter, it would be one of my all-season and in the summer, it is one of my winters.
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Jan 22, 2008
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platinumtiger19 wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 10:21 am
Was actually looking for a new pressure gauge mine has gone missing. I'm guessing the digital one aren't that accurate?
Accuracy isn't necessarily the issue, but for something as simple as a tire pressure gauge, digital takes up more room in the glove box, needs batteries, may have summer/winter temperature issues and will almost certainly fail much sooner than a basic but well built gauge like in the OP.

Friendly reminder that tire pressures should only be measured when the vehicle hasn't been moved in the past several hours. Also, the vehicle's recommend tire pressure should be listed inside the driver's side door jamb and can be different for front and rear tires.
Last edited by SizzleChest on Mar 1st, 2019 12:07 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
Sep 8, 2017
2006 posts
2047 upvotes
GTA
That's pretty slick with the tread depth gauge. But judging by their website, this isn't made in the USA.

I got one recently from Princess Auto that was made in the USA. Can't remember the brand, but it was like $5.

Speaking of the Milton website, are the prices on there for real? They have pencil tire gauges listed at $700-900.
Member
Mar 17, 2015
233 posts
313 upvotes
Saskatoon, SK
vkizzle wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 8:16 am
5-50psi on sale at CT for $3.19
Plastic? If it is, it ain't worth it as they are useless (ie break/crack) in cold weather if left in a vehicle...
Smile at strangers... joy is easier to spread than misery (unless the stranger offers you candy, then run like hell!).
Sr. Member
Jan 3, 2007
894 posts
312 upvotes
Toronto
This is a good deal if it's accurate.

I bought a digital one once from Canadian Tire. It was never accurate. Gave me different readings all the time. Could be the brand though. It was bulky, and needed battery replacement once in a while.

So a simple design with a small footprint that just works is perfect. Having a tire tread depth gauge is a good bonus too.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
27188 posts
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Ottawa
Wheatboy wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 11:49 am
Plastic? If it is, it ain't worth it as they are useless (ie break/crack) in cold weather if left in a vehicle...
Yes, I have a few and they serve their purpose.
I keep one in the glove box of each vehicle, despite having individual TPMS tire readings in my newer vehicles.
Member
Mar 17, 2015
233 posts
313 upvotes
Saskatoon, SK
vkizzle wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 11:56 am
Yes, I have a few and they serve their purpose.
I keep one in the glove box of each vehicle, despite having individual TPMS tire readings in my newer vehicles.
TPMS are great for warning of sudden punctures & uneven pressures that should be checked. I agree fully that a real pressure gauge should be used to check when filling up though.
Smile at strangers... joy is easier to spread than misery (unless the stranger offers you candy, then run like hell!).
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Feb 19, 2009
1129 posts
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Burlington
vkizzle wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 8:16 am
5-50psi on sale at CT for $3.19
You initially recommend a cheaper alternative gauge.
oicurmt wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 8:39 am

Lots of tires out there require more than 50 psi.
Someone correctly points out your recommended gauge is inferior due to it's max 50 psi measurement.
vkizzle wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 8:45 am

Sure, commercial vehicles.
Personal commuters as recommended by the factory and not what the max the tire can handle, are below 50psi.
You try to defend your recommendation by asserting only commercial vehicle tires require more than 50 psi, and personal cars do not.
WHITEMARKET wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 9:07 am

Hybrid bikes are very much personal commuter vehicles.
82 wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 9:08 am
hmm... my bike.

S920 is 10-70 psi
Other users point out that their bike tires need more than 50 psi.
Phantasm wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 9:21 am

Most mini spare tires in trunks of cars need 60 psi.
I point out that cars need more than 50 psi in their mini spare tires.
vkizzle wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 9:35 am
What's the actual recommendation?


What's the actual recommendation?

Sure, how often are you checking it?
This is where a normal person would admit their mistake and that the 50 psi max gauge isn't useful for the average person after all. Instead you double down by casting doubt on the recommended bicycle tire pressures, and questioning how often people check their spare tires. You fail to recognize that regardless of how often people check their spare tires, when they do check, they need a gauge that measures over 50 psi!
ultraguy wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 9:39 am
My boat trailer needs 80psi. Just an FYI for people with trailers, a 50 psi gauge may be inadequate.
Another example of a 50 psi gauge not being useful.
vkizzle wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 10:39 am
I use one of my full size tire as a spare...in the winter, it would be one of my all-season and in the summer, it is one of my winters.
Whether you personally use a mini spare or not is irrelevant. The fact is, it's not just commercial vehicles that have tires over 50 psi. Virtually all cars with mini spares do too, as well as many bicycle and trailer tires.

Why not just admit that the gauge you recommended, while cheaper, is not useful to the average person due to it's 50 psi limit?
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
27188 posts
13184 upvotes
Ottawa
Phantasm wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 3:20 pm
You initially recommend a cheaper alternative gauge.

Someone correctly points out your recommended gauge is inferior due to it's max 50 psi measurement.

You try to defend your recommendation by asserting only commercial vehicle tires require more than 50 psi, and personal cars do not.

Other users point out that their bike tires need more than 50 psi.

I point out that cars need more than 50 psi in their mini spare tires.



This is where a normal person would admit their mistake and that the 50 psi max gauge isn't useful for the average person after all. Instead you double down by casting doubt on the recommended bicycle tire pressures, and questioning how often people check their spare tires. You fail to recognize that regardless of how often people check their spare tires, when they do check, they need a gauge that measures over 50 psi!

Another example of a 50 psi gauge not being useful.

Whether you personally use a mini spare or not is irrelevant. The fact is, it's not just commercial vehicles that have tires over 50 psi. Virtually all cars with mini spares do too, as well as many bicycle and trailer tires.

Why not just admit that the gauge you recommended, while cheaper, is not useful to the average person due to it's 50 psi limit?
LMAO...there's about 140 employee vehicles in the parking lot at my workplace today.
I will bet you right now a 25 Tim card that none will go over 50psi, as per factory recommendation.
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May 9, 2003
1024 posts
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vkizzle wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 8:45 am
Sure, commercial vehicles.
Personal commuters as recommended by the factory and not what the max the tire can handle, are below 50psi.
A Ford Transit takes 75psi.

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