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[Amazon Canada] Milton Tire Pressure Gauge $7.22 Add on Item

  • Last Updated:
  • Apr 2nd, 2019 6:23 pm
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Debtario
Deal is still on. Funny how it's just $5 US across the border, we're severely overpaying up here.
mingyang wrote:
Mar 21st, 2019 2:29 pm
once upon a time, an RFDer suggested me to order Viair, glad I listened! much better than those cigarette port compressors. i don't have to leave the car running to use it though, maybe you have the 70p/77p model.
I agree, the viair compressors feel built to last. I got the 90P (when it was on sale for $65) that connects directly to the battery, no need to worry about blown fuses using the 12V port and it gets the job done fairly quick considering how small it is. The air pressure gauge on mine is also surprisingly accurate (you have to turn off the compressor to get a reading), though the non-removable air chuck is something I'd chuck (pun intended) if this weren't an occasional use unit. It won't replace a proper compressor, but it's a huge step up compared to the $20 throwaway plastic compressors from CT.
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saad29 wrote:
Mar 6th, 2019 5:56 am
Quick question(s) - everyone says measure when cold, and not driven (overnight etc), what about times with extreme temperature variations.

Eg. I measure and adjust at 6AM when temp is -15C. During day it's going up to 0C or higher. Or the inverse (hotter in AM, freezing during day)

Do I adjust everyday ? Multiple times in a day ? What is PSI to Degrees C correlation?

Also- Nitrogen filled tires - do they really help in this situation?
In addition to these questions, I wonder if outside temperature play a factor in the accuracy of this type of spring loaded gauge. I had three of similar gauges which I used at -20 degree to measure my tire pressure in February and none of them gave me the same reading. This make me wonder if a digital gauge will be more accurate.
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Guys trust me. There is no such thing as accuracy. While at it are you gonna debate with nitrogen air ?

Every 10 degree change in temperature has a factor on PSI. While u are all so good at debating this accuracy, none of you actually does out or remove air at every 10 degree temperature change.

Raining cold days, hot summer days, in between days, I mean don't you have something more important to do in your life that keep giving air in or out ?

Bottom line is perfect accuracy isn't even important because external environment will make it impossible to calculate.

As long as you have one and gives you an estimate, it has done his job and is probably more accurate than using ur finger to touch the tire hardness.
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L4cky wrote:
Apr 1st, 2019 4:52 am
Guys trust me. There is no such thing as accuracy. While at it are you gonna debate with nitrogen air ?

Every 10 degree change in temperature has a factor on PSI. While u are all so good at debating this accuracy, none of you actually does out or remove air at every 10 degree temperature change.

Raining cold days, hot summer days, in between days, I mean don't you have something more important to do in your life that keep giving air in or out ?

Bottom line is perfect accuracy isn't even important because external environment will make it impossible to calculate.

As long as you have one and gives you an estimate, it has done his job and is probably more accurate than using ur finger to touch the tire hardness.
In my original post I was asking about checking multiple times a day (I do commercial runs in a smal vehicle part time).

I check tire pressure every start of my run.

So if it does make a difference- I would still like to know.

Also could you elaborate on the relation between 10 degrees and PSI please?

Thanks
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kryton619 wrote:
Mar 1st, 2019 8:25 am
Not a made in USA Milton gauge.
Can you post the link if you don't mind? Thanks
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saad29 wrote:
Apr 1st, 2019 5:45 am
In my original post I was asking about checking multiple times a day (I do commercial runs in a smal vehicle part time).

I check tire pressure every start of my run.

So if it does make a difference- I would still like to know.

Also could you elaborate on the relation between 10 degrees and PSI please?

Thanks
Pressure is directly related to temperature outside. Every change of around 10 degree cold will decrease the PSI and every increase will increase PSI. Nitrogen air tends to cause less variation. what is important is the range of PSI.

Yes bad pressure within the tired might cause some problems. But the same gauge will read bad on both 4 tires which makes it even.
"Every marathon you run, your heart scars and you will die faster. If you think running a marathon is fitness, then you know NOTHING ABOUT HEALTH & FITNESS."
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Oct 28, 2013
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Saskatoon
Saad29; check your tires ONCE per day at the start of your run.... with the tires cold.
This is what the operators manual for your (and every other) vehicle built and sold in North America says.
If you have a commercial driver's licence, this is also what the professional driver's manual says to do.
Your tires should be inflated to the pressure that's stated on the sticker that's inside the driver's door frame.

If you think you've got a leak, or a tire looks low or you think there's an odd noise noise coming from a tire - by all means check them. If none of this apply's ...... leave them alone.
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May 3, 2016
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JDK111 wrote:
Apr 1st, 2019 11:39 am
Saad29; check your tires ONCE per day at the start of your run.... with the tires cold.
This is what the operators manual for your (and every other) vehicle built and sold in North America says.
If you have a commercial driver's licence, this is also what the professional driver's manual says to do.
Your tires should be inflated to the pressure that's stated on the sticker that's inside the driver's door frame.

If you think you've got a leak, or a tire looks low or you think there's an odd noise noise coming from a tire - by all means check them. If none of this apply's ...... leave them alone.
Awesome- Thanks

Will stick to once per run.

Although I can feel the tires getting harder about 2-300km into the run lol.

I always start at 35-36PSI (door rating is 30 but that's too soft and mushy of a ride, plus better fuel economy at 35) FWIW its an 07 Camry - knock on wood - no abnormal wear from 5 PSI extra so far.
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I don't like these types of tire gauges...harder to read and if that "stick" thing sticks you're not getting a proper read. I prefer the digital ones.

Something like this

https://www.canadiantire.ca/en/pdp/moto ... p.html#srp
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Failure is always an option...just not the preferred one!
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L4cky wrote:
Apr 1st, 2019 11:11 am
Pressure is directly related to temperature outside. Every change of around 10 degree cold will decrease the PSI and every increase will increase PSI. Nitrogen air tends to cause less variation. what is important is the range of PSI.

Yes bad pressure within the tired might cause some problems. But the same gauge will read bad on both 4 tires which makes it even.
As most of us have seen in high school, pressure is directly proportional to temperature (T) when T is measured in Kelvin (where Kelvin T is equal to Celsius T plus 273). So, in theory, even a one degree change in T affects the pressure, albeit insignigicantly so in this context. Roughly speaking, every 10 degree increase in T increases pressure by about 3.5 % (at temperatures experienced on Earth), which translates to a one PSI increase for a tire at 30 PSI; which is why we are told to check pressure when tires are cold, i.e. before they heat up during a drive.
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hover62 wrote:
Apr 2nd, 2019 1:57 pm
As most of us have seen in high school, pressure is directly proportional to temperature (T) when T is measured in Kelvin (where Kelvin T is equal to Celsius T plus 273). So, in theory, even a one degree change in T affects the pressure, albeit insignigicantly so in this context. Roughly speaking, every 10 degree increase in T increases pressure by about 3.5 % (at temperatures experienced on Earth), which translates to a one PSI increase for a tire at 30 PSI; which is why we are told to check pressure when tires are cold, i.e. before they heat up during a drive.
But most people check the pressure once only when they change tire.
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Ordered one as an add on item. I highly doubt that it’s made in the USA though.
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Is this better than an electronic gauge?

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