Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon.ca] Noco Genius 2 - $53

  • Last Updated:
  • Mar 1st, 2021 9:03 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 17, 2003
165 posts
131 upvotes
Toronto

[Amazon.ca] Noco Genius 2 - $53

Noco Genius 2 on sale for $53.

It was on sale before lower, but I can’t find my time machine. Good price to maintain your car batteries during the pandemic when you’re not driving much.

Hope this isn’t a repost.
20 replies
Jr. Member
Jan 21, 2008
161 posts
150 upvotes
I find with my Subaru that I have to wait a few seconds or minute after I turn to fully start the car.

I don't know if it's the battery but I'll definitely use this to diagnose it.

Thanks OP
[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 17, 2003
165 posts
131 upvotes
Toronto
shnukms wrote: I find with my Subaru that I have to wait a few seconds or minute after I turn to fully start the car.

I don't know if it's the battery but I'll definitely use this to diagnose it.

Thanks OP
You can use a voltmeter to measure your battery to see what kind of charge it’s got. Anything less that 12.6V means your battery isn’t at 100%, anything reading below 12V means your battery pretty dead.
Jr. Member
Jan 21, 2008
161 posts
150 upvotes
cryptobrian wrote: You can use a voltmeter to measure your battery to see what kind of charge it’s got. Anything less that 12.6V means your battery isn’t at 100%, anything reading below 12V means your battery pretty dead.
From what I read, this device can help with that? I don't own a voltmeter, will this be able to tell me what you mentioned? Thanks
[OP]
Jr. Member
Nov 17, 2003
165 posts
131 upvotes
Toronto
shnukms wrote: From what I read, this device can help with that? I don't own a voltmeter, will this be able to tell me what you mentioned? Thanks
SORT of.. but not really. When you attach the Noco to your battery to charge, there’s 4 LEDs for charge status in 25% increments.

In theory, if it starts at the 2nd LED, you can infer it’s about 50% charged.

BUT I would definitely recommend a voltmeter. You can get one for about $15, and super handy when you need it.
Sr. Member
Jun 10, 2017
680 posts
887 upvotes
I second getting a multimeter.. There's just so much use for it beyond checking your car battery. You can also check your household batteries as example. We all have those moments when you got loose batteries lying around and you don't know if they're still good or if you need to toss.. Or when instructions says not to mix good and bad battery, you'll be able to confidently know that the voltage of both or more batteries you're putting in is the same.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
16037 posts
17317 upvotes
Oakville
shnukms wrote: From what I read, this device can help with that? I don't own a voltmeter, will this be able to tell me what you mentioned? Thanks
Definitely get a multimeter, everyone should have one. Here are some cheap options.
$19 https://www.amazon.ca/Digital-Multimete ... 08L8Y9S1D/
$17 https://www.amazon.ca/Multimeter-Measur ... 08H8F3YGP/
$19 https://www.amazon.ca/Tekpower-DT830BT- ... 0160GT8DW/
Deal Expert
Jan 27, 2006
16510 posts
9303 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
shnukms wrote: From what I read, this device can help with that? I don't own a voltmeter, will this be able to tell me what you mentioned? Thanks
If you are going to test the battery going forward, I would recommend that you skip the voltmeter and jump to an actual battery tester. The voltmeter will only give you an approximation of the battery's state of charge and NOT the actual health of the battery - you can have a 'full' battery that is unhealthy and it won't start your car.

Princess Auto has one for $30 - https://www.princessauto.com/en/12v-bat ... 0008943383.
Deal Expert
User avatar
Feb 11, 2007
16037 posts
17317 upvotes
Oakville
craftsman wrote: If you are going to test the battery going forward, I would recommend that you skip the voltmeter and jump to an actual battery tester. The voltmeter will only give you an approximation of the battery's state of charge and NOT the actual health of the battery - you can have a 'full' battery that is unhealthy and it won't start your car.

Princess Auto has one for $30 - https://www.princessauto.com/en/12v-bat ... 0008943383.
Canadian Tire and Auto Partsway will test your battery for free on their load tester. You just have to remove it and bring it in.
Deal Expert
Jan 27, 2006
16510 posts
9303 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
engineered wrote: Canadian Tire and Auto Partsway will test your battery for free on their load tester. You just have to remove it and bring it in.
There's a certain level of convenience when you can test the battery at home without having to remove anything.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 24, 2008
2117 posts
812 upvotes
I bought a Noco Genius 5 last year and it was a good purchase. Between driving a lot less and the electronics in my car draining my battery when parked, there were times my battery struggled to start the car. Now I use the Noco to top up my battery and it works like a charm.
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Member
Jun 10, 2020
384 posts
297 upvotes
... Must have been VERY limited time offer on Amazon (as per the link/url as the deal is already dead and it's back up to $80.

Was a good price, I got one for arnd 60 @ CanTire. Worked well for me. I want the 5 now for faster recharge and to experiment with the supposed 'restore' function..
Deal Addict
Aug 7, 2011
1424 posts
1576 upvotes
VANCOUVER
cryptobrian wrote: SORT of.. but not really. When you attach the Noco to your battery to charge, there’s 4 LEDs for charge status in 25% increments.

In theory, if it starts at the 2nd LED, you can infer it’s about 50% charged.

BUT I would definitely recommend a voltmeter. You can get one for about $15, and super handy when you need it.
Unfortunately what you stated is wrong. I have one of these and even if your battery is 100% full, the Noco 2 starts blinking at the lowest led. So whether or not your battery is dead or fully charged you see the same light pattern. Only difference is when your battery is full, it goes through the light segments faster. I also used this with a dead (read ~0v on multimeter) ups battery. It blinked on the lowest led for a long time then finally displayed an error code basically telling me the battery is dead.

Anyways it's a great device. Highly recommended. Don't bother getting a larger unit since the only difference is the amperage which only means it will take longer to charge with this one compared to the Noco 5 or higher. It doesn't matter what your battery capacity is. Also you can't jump start a car with one of these lower model trickle chargers.
Jr. Member
May 2, 2017
124 posts
133 upvotes
goozy1 wrote: Unfortunately what you stated is wrong. I have one of these and even if your battery is 100% full, the Noco 2 starts blinking at the lowest led.
Yep, I have a Noco 2 and this is exactly true. First time I used it on my car, it took a day to fully charge, but since then I top up the battery every month and that only takes 3-4 hrs now to go from blinking red (lowest) to full green (100%). It does always start at red though so I can't use this to estimate the initial charge of the battery.

Noco 2 is really ideal as a trickle charger. For battery maintenance, possible reason to get Noco 5 instead is for the repair/restore feature, but that feature does not work on an AGM battery according to Noco, which is what I've got in my car.
Deal Addict
May 25, 2011
2797 posts
3856 upvotes
SAINT JOHN
GenericMember wrote: I second getting a multimeter.. There's just so much use for it beyond checking your car battery. You can also check your household batteries as example. We all have those moments when you got loose batteries lying around and you don't know if they're still good or if you need to toss.. Or when instructions says not to mix good and bad battery, you'll be able to confidently know that the voltage of both or more batteries you're putting in is the same.
cryptobrian wrote: SORT of.. but not really. When you attach the Noco to your battery to charge, there’s 4 LEDs for charge status in 25% increments.

In theory, if it starts at the 2nd LED, you can infer it’s about 50% charged.

BUT I would definitely recommend a voltmeter. You can get one for about $15, and super handy when you need it.
shnukms wrote: From what I read, this device can help with that? I don't own a voltmeter, will this be able to tell me what you mentioned? Thanks



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May 22, 2013
82 posts
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Ontario
cryptobrian wrote: You can use a voltmeter to measure your battery to see what kind of charge it’s got. Anything less that 12.6V means your battery isn’t at 100%, anything reading below 12V means your battery pretty dead.
Also when starting the car, check the battery cranking amps with the voltage meter, it shouldn't drop to far below 10V. This might take 2 people to do unless the meter has a lowest memory setting. When running the battery/alternator will bring it up to around 14V.
But it's the cranking volts that will determine if the vehicle will become difficult to start in this test.
Deal Expert
Jan 27, 2006
16510 posts
9303 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
DasHip wrote: ... Must have been VERY limited time offer on Amazon (as per the link/url as the deal is already dead and it's back up to $80.

Was a good price, I got one for arnd 60 @ CanTire. Worked well for me. I want the 5 now for faster recharge and to experiment with the supposed 'restore' function..
If you are just topping off your battery (ie recharging it before it gets down to 80% or so), the Genius 5 isn't going to be really any faster to recharge a battery fully. All multi-stage battery chargers lower their current output as the battery gets closer to full. Often, the last 20% of the battery may take longer to charge than the first 80%.
Deal Expert
Jan 27, 2006
16510 posts
9303 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
bliz99 wrote: For battery maintenance, possible reason to get Noco 5 instead is for the repair/restore feature, but that feature does not work on an AGM battery according to Noco, which is what I've got in my car.
It's not that it doesn't work on AGM batteries but it's not recommended. The battery chemistry is the same for an AGM and a standard flooded. The difference is how the two methods are implemented - an AGM has a glass mat to hold the electrolyte while the standard flooded doesn't and the AGMs are sealed meaning you can't put more water in the battery when the fluid level drops - some standard flooded batteries are also sealed. The problem with repair modes is that they typically cause the battery to produce gas which lowers the level of the electrolyte. In an unsealed battery, this isn't too much of a problem as you just pop the caps and add a bit of distilled water to make up for the loss. In a sealed battery such as an AGM, you can't do that so the battery will degrade over time as the electrolyte levels can be restored.
Deal Expert
Jan 27, 2006
16510 posts
9303 upvotes
Vancouver, BC
engineered wrote: Is it as good though?
For those who are willing and able as well as have the time to do it, yes. But for those who aren't, no.

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