Hot Deals

[Amazon.ca] PNY 2.5" SATA III Internal SSD 120GB $25 240GB $38 480GB $65

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 18th, 2020 12:08 pm
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 11, 2006
2185 posts
834 upvotes
Temporel wrote: Wrong again.

A copy of the Map Table is constantly stored on the NANDs (in case of power failure) and is updated before shut down.
You almost never strat from scratch.

https://www.elinfor.com/knowledge/compr ... -2-p-11039
Ok this really isn't fair. You are killing me here. Have you tested start times in various SSDs? Include SATA, NVMe, PCIe, DRAM, DRAMless...etc. Or is your knowledge drawn from what you read on the 'net'. I am all for getting into a conversation in detail and not trying to run and find an article supporting what you say every time i throw a question your way...at which time you pick and choose what you will answer.

And let's not forget... you have stated that everyone interested in this SSD only cares about boot times. That needs to stay right there where you said it.

AND... You need to read this very carefully since you quoted it and are relying on it to say that the mapping tables are somehow stored in SDRAM when the power is off -

A mapping table is maintained in SSD. In general, DRAM is on board in SSD, which is used to store temporary data of program running and will be lost when power fails. The mapping table is stored in SDRAM (convenient for quick access), and several mapping tables are stored in NAND Flash (to prevent loss of mapping relationship after power failures). What’s more, the mapping tables in NAND Flash are updated regularly.
Last edited by flamenko on Sep 16th, 2020 8:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
----------------------------------------------
SSDs - STUFF ADDED 18 SEP 20 (LINK)
Member
Aug 14, 2019
251 posts
274 upvotes
I placed an order on the 240gb, no taxes!

lol @ complaining about DRAM for a $25/$38 ssd.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 10, 2011
4327 posts
6122 upvotes
Montreal
flamenko wrote: Ok this really isn't fair. You are killing me here. Have you tested start times in various SSDs? Include SATA, NVMe, PCIe, DRAM, DRAMless...etc. Or is your knowledge drawn from what you read on the 'net'. I am all for getting into a conversation in detail and not trying to run and find an article supporting what you say every time i throw a question your way...at which time you pick and choose what you will answer.

And let's not forget... you have stated that everyone interested in this SSD only cares about boot times. That needs to stay right there where you said it.
Oh, I see. You don't trust the "so called" professionals on the "net" controlled by The Deep State I presume...
You only trust your own vast knowledge all derived from "real life" experiments.
Every professional says DRAM is better especially for a system drive but you say it doesn't matter.
Fine, you made your case.
Now let the people decide what they want; it's their money and their time after all.
I'm done replying to you.
Goodbye!
Sr. Member
Mar 15, 2019
671 posts
849 upvotes
I know lots of people have mentioned "RAM" vs. "RAMless" etc.
And I'm not a drive expert.

However, SSDs without builtin RAM will utilize system RAM (your memory in PC) to perform READ/WRITE. And RAM speed matters a lot.
For technology like this (SATA ~500MB/s, less than CAD80), no need to spend too much deciding. Just buy if you need one.
-------------------
GO zoomers ~
$36 4GB UNLIMITED voicemail + a free phone / 2yr
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 11, 2006
2185 posts
834 upvotes
Temporel wrote: Oh, I see. You don't trust the "so called" professionals on the "net" controlled by The Deep State I presume...
You only trust your own vast knowledge all derived from "real life" experiments.
Every professional says DRAM is better especially for a system drive but you say it doesn't matter.
Fine, you made your case.
Now let the people decide what they want; it's their money and their time after all.
I'm done replying to you.
Goodbye!
No... what I am saying to you is that you made a mistake in what you read. Be a man and own up to it. SDRAM maintains NOTHING without power. I included the entire quote so you might reread it. And I agree, let people decide what they want without someone who read that SSDs without DRAM are no good from Linus professing that they have first hand knowledge of such.
----------------------------------------------
SSDs - STUFF ADDED 18 SEP 20 (LINK)
Deal Addict
User avatar
Apr 10, 2011
4327 posts
6122 upvotes
Montreal
flamenko wrote: Ok this really isn't fair. You are killing me here. Have you tested start times in various SSDs? Include SATA, NVMe, PCIe, DRAM, DRAMless...etc. Or is your knowledge drawn from what you read on the 'net'. I am all for getting into a conversation in detail and not trying to run and find an article supporting what you say every time i throw a question your way...at which time you pick and choose what you will answer.

And let's not forget... you have stated that everyone interested in this SSD only cares about boot times. That needs to stay right there where you said it.

AND... You need to read this very carefully since you quoted it and are relying on it to say that the mapping tables are somehow stored in SDRAM when the power is off -

A mapping table is maintained in SSD. In general, DRAM is on board in SSD, which is used to store temporary data of program running and will be lost when power fails. The mapping table is stored in SDRAM (convenient for quick access), and several mapping tables are stored in NAND Flash (to prevent loss of mapping relationship after power failures). What’s more, the mapping tables in NAND Flash are updated regularly.
Now you are editing your post with ridiculous falsehood which is not cool.

I never said that "the mapping tables are somehow stored in SDRAM when the power is off".

That makes you a dishonest person or someone who can't understand what he/she reads.

What I wrote was "A copy of the Map Table is constantly stored on the NANDs (in case of power failure) and is updated before shut down. Then, when you restart, the Map Table is reloaded in the DRAM chip."

And MY post has not been edited since 7:58 pm.

But why do I bother, you probably don't even know the difference between a NAND and a DRAM chip.

Also, you wrote that I "have stated that everyone interested in this SSD only cares about boot times."

That is also false.

Yeah, I'm sure you know a lot more than that "Linus professing" guy.

Where are YOUR technical videos exactly? I must learn... Face With Tears Of Joy
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 11, 2006
2185 posts
834 upvotes
You seem a bit misplaced at being explained things. When I said that nothing was stored in DRAM and was all stored in the NAND chips, your response with the link that, if read improperly might infer that the mapping tables are stored in SDRAM was "Wrong again" In any case...

"You don't buy a SSD for typing. You mainly buy a SSD for faster boot time." ... is pretty clear.
----------------------------------------------
SSDs - STUFF ADDED 18 SEP 20 (LINK)
Sr. Member
Dec 13, 2006
547 posts
233 upvotes
I always tough DRAM was most usefull on sustained write operation. I don't understand the arguing about random seek time at boot where DRAM should have no impact.

Well for my part I think that 30$ buck extra on a DRAM drive is not the best way to spend 30 buck. It can in some case... But for the difference in real life.. 30$ on a video card.. On a cpu.. On a better monitor is a much better use.
Deal Fanatic
Nov 17, 2004
6997 posts
1355 upvotes
Toronto
DRAMless SATA SSDs typically are limited to about 20MB/s in 4kQD1 reads. With DRAM they typically do about 35MB/s 4kQD1 reads. High end SATA SSDs like the samsung EVO 860 typically get near 50MB/s 4kQD1 reads.

If you are doing technical work like; coding, MATLAB, CAD, etc..., usually there are alot of small file reads and having better 4kQD1 numbers does help save a second here and there, it is enough that you notice.

For email, web browsing, playing games, MS word, MS excel, and other light tasks, having better 4KQD1 numbers would likely be not noticeable.
I workout to get big so I can pickup bricks and ****.
Newbie
Aug 9, 2006
91 posts
23 upvotes
Markham
how do these compare to the Silicon Power A58 256GB/512GB drives on Amazon @ $40.99/$64.99?
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 21, 2002
9541 posts
2144 upvotes
Winnipeg
toalan wrote: DRAMless SATA SSDs typically are limited to about 20MB/s in 4kQD1 reads. With DRAM they typically do about 35MB/s 4kQD1 reads. High end SATA SSDs like the samsung EVO 860 typically get near 50MB/s 4kQD1 reads.

If you are doing technical work like; coding, MATLAB, CAD, etc..., usually there are alot of small file reads and having better 4kQD1 numbers does help save a second here and there, it is enough that you notice.

For email, web browsing, playing games, MS word, MS excel, and other light tasks, having better 4KQD1 numbers would likely be not noticeable.
due to the algorithm of storing data on 3d nand the dram cache helps vs say slc cache etc during sustained multiple read writes. Good catch on the poster for the seagate 120 for 500gb for a budget drive at 69.99 with coupon. Would have bought the wd blue instead but seems staples has none....its coupon time so that's the reality.
Deal Fanatic
Apr 15, 2009
5128 posts
2953 upvotes
M-Arkham
bboy_skinnylegs wrote: how do these compare to the Silicon Power A58 256GB/512GB drives on Amazon @ $40.99/$64.99?
I would trust PNY QC for their drives over Silicon power
2x Zoomer $36 for 5GB , 800min Can wide talk n unlimited txt
1x Fido $40 for 5GB w/ unlimited Can Wide txt/talk small plan(+3GB bonus )
Member
User avatar
Sep 23, 2010
268 posts
273 upvotes
Toronto
So I take it these aren't very good for upgrading an old PC because they don't have DRAM? How much faster would an SSD with DRAM be over this one? Also, wouldn't you see an improvement in performance if these are used in place of a HDD?

Top