Expired Hot Deals

Amazon.ca

Samsung 870 EVO 1TB SATA 2.5" Internal SSD $139.99 ($30 off)

  • Last Updated:
  • Jul 16th, 2021 2:33 pm
[OP]
Newbie
Jan 12, 2011
14 posts
48 upvotes

[Amazon.ca] Samsung 870 EVO 1TB SATA 2.5" Internal SSD $139.99 ($30 off)

For those who are looking for an 1 TB SSD, you can get the Samsung 870 EVO 1 TB, one for the best SSD on the market, for $139.99 at various stores.

https://www.amazon.ca/Samsung-Internal- ... 321&sr=8-3

https://www.bestbuy.ca/en-ca/product/sa ... m/15266457

https://www.canadacomputers.com/product ... anguage=en

https://www.staples.ca/products/3002442 ... rive-black
21 replies
Member
Jun 21, 2010
397 posts
232 upvotes
London
Is there Staples coupons to go with this?
Member
Aug 20, 2018
222 posts
744 upvotes
There’s so many different threads that talk about different parts of different drives... and I still haven’t managed to find a clear place to read all the information in one place to make an informed decision.

Do any of the knowledgeable folk on here have a good site that they trust that I can go to to break down the different drive types? I’m looking for breaking down differences between things like NVME and NAND?
Sr. Member
User avatar
Nov 23, 2018
958 posts
328 upvotes
Markham ON
RandomGuy22 wrote: There’s so many different threads that talk about different parts of different drives... and I still haven’t managed to find a clear place to read all the information in one place to make an informed decision.

Do any of the knowledgeable folk on here have a good site that they trust that I can go to to break down the different drive types? I’m looking for breaking down differences between things like NVME and NAND?
nvme is smaller, and you don't need to run sata cables etc. (Better for small form factor build, or tidiness.) NVME is usually faster, but comes at a price premium over 2.5" SSD. Honestly I don't see much use for NVME ssd, unless you are doing a small form factor build, or are already running a ton of drives. If they are the same price, go with NVME, other wise, I wouldn't spend more money. (Don't buy this drive. Go buy the WD 1TB that is on sale rn. It is a better deal.)
Think Less, Imagine More
Costco is Bliss
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jun 1, 2007
1721 posts
521 upvotes
RandomGuy22 wrote: There’s so many different threads that talk about different parts of different drives... and I still haven’t managed to find a clear place to read all the information in one place to make an informed decision.

Do any of the knowledgeable folk on here have a good site that they trust that I can go to to break down the different drive types? I’m looking for breaking down differences between things like NVME and NAND?
Two choices, old 2.5" SATA drive, or newer m.2 80mm drives that come either as SATA or nvme interface. The m2 nvme drives are fastest but you'll be hard pressed to notice the difference in typical usage scenarios. Check to see what your computer supports.

Other than that it comes down to performance and durability. All modern SSD NAND are good memory chips, but the choice is between the three cell and four cell variants, with the prior being superior for performance and durability. Having DRAM present on the controller also helps.

Good question. I just realized how complex it is and there is even info missing from my post but I hope it helps.

To save you some time if you want a SATA drive then grab an Samsung EVO drive, or crucial mx500. Both are gold star standard.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jun 27, 2004
13386 posts
2605 upvotes
Vancouver.bc.ca
I don't doubt that this is one of the best SSDs available, but with the price of the WD Blue around $120 lately, I would opt for one of those, instead.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Feb 3, 2019
1207 posts
2442 upvotes
Canada
rabbit wrote: I don't doubt that this is one of the best SSDs available, but with the price of the WD Blue around $120 lately, I would opt for one of those, instead.
Link for WD blue?
Live a little
Deal Guru
User avatar
Jun 27, 2004
13386 posts
2605 upvotes
Vancouver.bc.ca
Don't know if the WD Blue is still on sale. A few places have had it on sale the past couple of weeks, different form factors and at fluctuating prices. Try Newegg.ca or Amazon.ca.

edit// What I mean is that WD Blue SSDs have been popping up on sale frequently the past couple of weeks (or maybe more ... time flies), so if you don't need something right now, you may want to wait for one to pop up again.

edit 2// Amazon and Newegg are both $135, so not on sale. For $5 difference, I would get the Samsung.
Last edited by rabbit on May 22nd, 2021 10:19 am, edited 1 time in total.
Member
Aug 20, 2018
222 posts
744 upvotes
Thanks, guys; I appreciate the help. I’ll skip this one and keep an eye out.

Before getting back into computers, I’d thought that it was largely just “physical disk v SSD”, but it’s only when I’ve got into more reading that I’ve noticed that SSD itself has so many sub-parts.

It’s just so tough to find a place where everything is broken down, but I’m more than happy to read the little bits of info like what’s been posted here!
Sr. Member
User avatar
Mar 5, 2006
752 posts
159 upvotes
Springfield
RandomGuy22 wrote: There’s so many different threads that talk about different parts of different drives... and I still haven’t managed to find a clear place to read all the information in one place to make an informed decision.

Do any of the knowledgeable folk on here have a good site that they trust that I can go to to break down the different drive types? I’m looking for breaking down differences between things like NVME and NAND?
NVME stands for non volatile memory express. It just means that the SSD interfaces with the CPU using the PCI-express bridge (vs the SATA bridge). The advantage of this is the maximum available bandwidth. One quick rundown here.

NAND is just the type of flash memory used in the SSD. One quick rundown here

Terms like M2 and SATA 2.5" are typically used in reference to the form factor of the SSD.
M2 drives are smaller, and can be in either a NVME form factor that with interface with the PCI express bus, or SATA form factor and interface with the SATA bus.
2.5" form factor is typically reserved only for the SATA interface.

You'll also want to looks up DRAM vs DRAMless SSD's.
Generally (but not in all cases) budget SSDs are DRAMless (to allow them to be cheaper) but also generally perform worse.
Deal Addict
Jul 11, 2006
2529 posts
1252 upvotes
RandomGuy22 wrote: Thanks, guys; I appreciate the help. I’ll skip this one and keep an eye out.

Before getting back into computers, I’d thought that it was largely just “physical disk v SSD”, but it’s only when I’ve got into more reading that I’ve noticed that SSD itself has so many sub-parts.

It’s just so tough to find a place where everything is broken down, but I’m more than happy to read the little bits of info like what’s been posted here!
Testing a new drive and waiting for some results so... SATA...or serial ATA was a set of operating instructions originally destined for hard drives, drives that run a single laneway of travel back and forth. Think of the hard drive and the arm with a single needle, much like a record. Imagine that as a one lane road. NVMe is the newest set of operating instructions, more commonly known as a protocol, and meant for new flash drives, or drives that save information electronically, and not by magnetic media. The NVMe protocol works in conjunction with PCIe (peripheral component interconnect express) and the most important thing to remember about PCIe is that it is NOT a single lane, but works in multiple lanes of two, but more commonly 4. Think of a multilane highway with two directional travel. The two most common things we hear about here are SATA3 notebook SSDs and NVMe SSDs...which are most commonly M.2 SSDs. SATA 3 SSDs will get you up to 550MB/s disk throughput (transfer speed) while NVMe will get you up to 7GB/s. The hiccup is being able to understand what your PC will accept. Not very common so much anymore, is the fact that we have SATA3 M.2 SSDs that only reach 550MB/s and there are notebooks that will only accept such.

So... the best thing I always suggest is to understand exactly what your system needs and do so by simply googling the name of the system with 'ssd upgrade'. There have been plenty along the way who have sought out the wrong SSD for the wrong system. The next most important thing to know is exactly what you intend to use the SSD for. Someone simply surfing the net and following basic computer activities requires something much different than a photographer who works in RAW files and requires much more complex photo apps for developing such as DXO4. I use DXO 4 and can tell you that, up until acquiring my most recent laptop, I never felt good using that software on a laptop as it was slow.

Having said this, there is not a person on earth that can differentiate between the most basic and most advanced SSD in typical PC use. Fact of life. Everything you see on a SSD in basic PC use has to do with seek times. How fast does it take to execute a command from the second you hit the enter key. On a typical SSD, it is around .02ms where on a hard drive, it is more like 9ms. That is a significant difference and the reason that a SSD contained PC starts so much faster than a hard drive system. Also, when using a SSD system, it almost feels like the keyboard knows exactly what key you are going to press before you actually press it; it is just that fast. The part where things get tricky is SSD comparisons... Since all SSDs have about .02ms seek time, nobody can tell the difference between any SSD in basic SSD use...not even if it is a SATA SSD or NVMe SSD. IN fact, you wont be able to tell the difference between a 7GB/s SSD and a 550MB/s SSD.

Now... most newer PCs have moved over to M.2 SSDs...and specifically the 2280 (80mm) form factor M.2 SSD simply because it is so small and so easy to integrate. A notebook SSD on the other hand, is the typical size of the older hard drives you might see in laptops.

NAND... flash memory. DRAM... is a small chip on most SSDs that acts like a super highway and pushed information much faster to speed up your SSD. Think of the 407 highway. Interface is the was a SSD connects.... SATA/SATA3/PCIe 3/ PCIe 4. SATA as we said goes up to 550MB/s, PCIe 3 - 3.5GB/s, PCIe 4 - 7GB/s . If we were to go back in time, typical the next interface doubles that of prior.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

ITEMS FOR SALE TODAY (Linked)
  1. WD Black AN1500 2TB AIC NVME SSD 6.5GB/s r/wr
  2. Intel i9-10900K and ASRock Z490 Taichi Motherboard
Member
Aug 20, 2018
222 posts
744 upvotes
Wow thanks so much! I’m going to bookmark this page so that I can refer to some of this info and some of the links!

I now understand the difference between sata and nvme; primarily that one uses the sata cable which is inherently slower than pci (multi lane vs single lane analogy)

I also now understand what this whole kinda “real world” concept. You’re effectively saying that a lot of these SSDs are so quick that people can’t really tell the difference. The main time it’s noticeable (for the average person) is on boot, simply because there are a lot of processes at once. But, in the grand scheme of things, the amount of time you take booting is minimal anyway.

Honestly, thanks so much to all. I hope others find this as helpful as I have!
Deal Addict
Dec 24, 2001
1887 posts
921 upvotes
Toronto
RandomGuy22 wrote: There’s so many different threads that talk about different parts of different drives... and I still haven’t managed to find a clear place to read all the information in one place to make an informed decision.

Do any of the knowledgeable folk on here have a good site that they trust that I can go to to break down the different drive types? I’m looking for breaking down differences between things like NVME and NAND?
Deal Addict
Mar 5, 2016
1018 posts
697 upvotes
Temporel wrote: $131 from the newegg store on Ebay.

Read the fine print about return/refund/warranty policies before buying, I'm too lazy to read it. Lol!
FWIW, I contacted Samsung Canada about warranty regarding something purchased from an eBay web store. They claimed that since Newegg is an authorized reseller (at least for the 860 that I bought), then the drive would qualify for warranty if required.

At $131, this is a good price for a drive that was literally just released a few months ago. I bought an 860 1TB for about 115 back in December, and this "faster" drive is only ~$15 more. I say "faster" in quotes because the reality is that the majority of people will not notice any difference whatsoever.
Deal Guru
User avatar
Mar 8, 2003
10047 posts
2205 upvotes
Richmond Hill
Temporel wrote: $131 from the newegg store on Ebay.

Read the fine print about return/refund/warranty policies before buying, I'm too lazy to read it. Lol!
Good find.
Deal Addict
Nov 21, 2014
1932 posts
2824 upvotes
Atlantic
jaisan wrote: Coupon Code did not work! :(
Really dude? I posted that May 28........coupon is long expired.

Top