Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon.ca] SANSI 17W (170 Watt Equivalent) A19 Dimmable LED Bulb, 2500 Lumens, 5000K, E26 Base, 5-yr Warranty. 30% off. $26.59

  • Last Updated:
  • Feb 24th, 2019 11:53 pm
Deal Addict
User avatar
Dec 19, 2007
3515 posts
2044 upvotes
Manitouwadge, Ontari…
Sure like 4 years ago at all the stores in Ontario. I mean I bought like 200 of them did you guys not as well?
---
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
May 17, 2006
5964 posts
1917 upvotes
GTA
elgros4 wrote: 5000K will burn your eyes. I recommende 2200 to 3000k max.
The higher, the more bluelight it will emit and disturb your sleep.
death_hawk wrote: I'd be more concerned about 2500 lumens disturbing my sleep...
You are meant to have the lights off before going to bed.
Sr. Member
Sep 13, 2011
568 posts
258 upvotes
ANJOU
By disturb, I meant prevent obviously. Before you go turn them off. I am surprised that bluelight problem seem new to somes,or maybe I don't get canadian humour ?
Newbie
Nov 26, 2003
58 posts
111 upvotes
Can also consider this one if you’re up for brighter, more and no constraint on size:

Sansi 27W (250 Watt Equivalent) A21 Dimmable LED Light Bulbs, 3500 Lumens, 5000K Daylight, 270° Omni-directional, E26 Medium Screw Base LED Floodlight Bulb, 5-Year Warranty, (2 Pack) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07B8XV2VX/ref ... CCbMZXC2B5

2 pack 3500 lumens for $62.99 minus $5 coupon.

I have both the 17W and 27W. Both are extremely bright for an A19/A21 lumiere. One excellent use case is to light up those “glare-free” fixtures where light loss % is very high by design, like the Louis Poulsen PH Artichoke.
Deal Addict
Sep 10, 2010
2339 posts
790 upvotes
Ottawa
chatbox wrote: These are typically for controlled lighting environments. (Not typically daily home use) i.e. They have their place.
https://photography.tutsplus.com/articl ... -cms-22708
https://www.diyphotography.net/take-cla ... ght-bulbs/
It lists 80 CRI. Isn't that a little low for a controlled light environment? I remember seeing bulbs in the 90 CRI range, or maybe I am remembering wrong.
Jojo_Madman wrote: Light colour is a matter of personal opinion ... some people only prefer 2200~3500K as it's close to what most incandescent lights were most times. Personally, I hate it as it casts a yellow hue on everything and does a poor job of rendering true colors.

Our home is completely 5000~5500K lighting and get compliments all the time about how "natural" feeling the lighting is ... and when we explain the colour temperature, people are shocked to know that it's that. Problem is people mix lighting colour temperatures in a home and it sticks out.
the thing to remember is that temperature is only part of the colour accuracy. You probably also have High CRI lights. The flashlight people used to love the bright white 5000K lights, until the manufacturers started coming out with lower temp lights that had high CRI. Now everybody is loving those lower temp lights with high CRI because it is easier on the eyes and gives better colour rendering.

5000K can often washout the colours with a tinge of blue, while 3000K can often not make the colours pop because of the yellow. Your 5000K may look great, but unless it is High CRI, you may be missing a lot, and don't even notice it.

I think what people are referring to with the 5000K and sleep is because you shouldn't be having bright white lights on before you sleep. The bright white 5000K lights trick your brain into thinking it is still daytime and you don't produce the chemicals in sleep as quickly. Some people might have trouble falling asleep if they are exposed to 5000K before bed as happens when using your cellphone. That is why there are apps now that lower the amount of blue light from your screen during the night time. Some places of work have also started having employees use different colour lenses in their glasses for night shift workers because of how the temperature of the lights mess with sleep patterns.
Sr. Member
User avatar
Oct 24, 2016
630 posts
460 upvotes
ON
Can someone please help me understand what’s so special about this bulb at this price? About 1-2 years back I bought many led’s at 99 cents. I thought I got a good deal only to see a year later prices go down even further. Granted those under a dollar are 60 or 80 watt equivalent but still....unless I’m missing something?
Isn't it great to live in the 21st century where deleting history has become more important than making it.
Sr. Member
Mar 16, 2018
527 posts
525 upvotes
Hamilton
Oof 5000k - hate it when a friend uses daylight bulbs in living spaces. "Welcome to my family room that doubles as a hospital OR!"
Member
Feb 22, 2017
330 posts
372 upvotes
Ontario
It would be nice to just have smart bulbs that had colour temperature that tracked the day, and stuck to 3000 at night.
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2007
2192 posts
1531 upvotes
SW Ontario
eugene188 wrote: It lists 80 CRI. Isn't that a little low for a controlled light environment? I remember seeing bulbs in the 90 CRI range, or maybe I am remembering wrong.



the thing to remember is that temperature is only part of the colour accuracy. You probably also have High CRI lights. The flashlight people used to love the bright white 5000K lights, until the manufacturers started coming out with lower temp lights that had high CRI. Now everybody is loving those lower temp lights with high CRI because it is easier on the eyes and gives better colour rendering.

5000K can often washout the colours with a tinge of blue, while 3000K can often not make the colours pop because of the yellow. Your 5000K may look great, but unless it is High CRI, you may be missing a lot, and don't even notice it.

I think what people are referring to with the 5000K and sleep is because you shouldn't be having bright white lights on before you sleep. The bright white 5000K lights trick your brain into thinking it is still daytime and you don't produce the chemicals in sleep as quickly. Some people might have trouble falling asleep if they are exposed to 5000K before bed as happens when using your cellphone. That is why there are apps now that lower the amount of blue light from your screen during the night time. Some places of work have also started having employees use different colour lenses in their glasses for night shift workers because of how the temperature of the lights mess with sleep patterns.
Yes high CRI
I'd rather be outdoors camping, kayaking, and mountain biking ...
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 9, 2002
2539 posts
484 upvotes
Burlington
csa/cul?
Nothing in the listing.
If not, not worth the insurance risk.
Not sure how amazon can get away with selling non-csa products. yes, in many cases CSA is a 'pay to play', but still, ins companies will take any opportunity to deny payout.
Not your standard VoIP. Different and novel options & advice for my RFD friends.
Newbie
User avatar
Dec 9, 2017
90 posts
107 upvotes
I have 3000k main floor and recently switched to 5000k upstairs. Upstairs looks better and a lot more light. Anything under 3000k is not as efficient, imho.
Will be switching it all to 5000k. I hate the yellow hint or poor lighting in a room.
Thanks op!
Deal Fanatic
Apr 17, 2003
8653 posts
4160 upvotes
MVRD
eugene188 wrote: It lists 80 CRI. Isn't that a little low for a controlled light environment? I remember seeing bulbs in the 90 CRI range, or maybe I am remembering wrong.



the thing to remember is that temperature is only part of the colour accuracy. You probably also have High CRI lights. The flashlight people used to love the bright white 5000K lights, until the manufacturers started coming out with lower temp lights that had high CRI. Now everybody is loving those lower temp lights with high CRI because it is easier on the eyes and gives better colour rendering.

5000K can often washout the colours with a tinge of blue, while 3000K can often not make the colours pop because of the yellow. Your 5000K may look great, but unless it is High CRI, you may be missing a lot, and don't even notice it.

I think what people are referring to with the 5000K and sleep is because you shouldn't be having bright white lights on before you sleep. The bright white 5000K lights trick your brain into thinking it is still daytime and you don't produce the chemicals in sleep as quickly. Some people might have trouble falling asleep if they are exposed to 5000K before bed as happens when using your cellphone. That is why there are apps now that lower the amount of blue light from your screen during the night time. Some places of work have also started having employees use different colour lenses in their glasses for night shift workers because of how the temperature of the lights mess with sleep patterns.
Good catch...needs to have a higher CRI if possible.
Newbie
Dec 29, 2008
52 posts
91 upvotes
Mississauga
All my light bulbs are 2700k warm white because warm white is less harsh on your eyes and helps you "wind down" after work and sleep better at night. During the day when I occasionally work from home, i keep my windows open so I get natural light. I use 5000k lights in my garage so I can work on my car, but will never go inside my house.
Deal Expert
Jan 17, 2009
17737 posts
24799 upvotes
ONTARIO
ssjlancer wrote: To each their own. 5000k+ is hospital lighting. Keeps the doctors and nurses awake on their shift.
This was my thought as well. I bought the wrong bulb before and had to stop using it after one day. Just way too white.. It IS too much like you're in a hospital or an office building or something. It's gross.

Top