Expired Hot Deals

[Amazon Canada] Silicon Power 1TB NVMe 3,400/3,000MB - HOT at $131.74

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 2nd, 2019 11:25 am
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Jul 1, 2009
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IHavocI wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 6:48 pm
Thank you for the response.

Debating on whether to return my XPG Gammix S11 Pro and buy this drive instead. I already have it installed.

Tough decision.
Sorry, I should have specified that the S11 Pro isn't a bad drive by any stretch. As long as you make sure not to fill it past, say, 70% (delete a game or two when approaching that amount, etc) you should be fine. It has just slightly slower speeds than the SP/Corsair drives under non-full conditions - you wouldn't notice it much unless you're looking for it or under specific use cases.

If you paid a good price for your Gammix and you think you can manage the capacity pretty well you might consider keeping it. That being said: I returned mine (HP EX950 - same drive-ish) when I ran across the limitation. Tough decision indeed. You can't go wrong either way, really.
Last edited by Elrondolio on Jul 30th, 2019 7:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Psykopathik wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 6:29 pm
I have a 256gb Corsair sata ssd.
Would these style drives be a big perfoemance boost?
It can be, depending on use, but in most cases it wouldn't be massively faster. It won't be anywhere near as dramatic as going from spinning to solid state of course. Increases in capacity also inherently give better speeds, SATA or NVMe. If you did purchase a fast x4 NVMe drive, you'd want to make sure your system supports it.
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Aug 31, 2010
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Victoria
Elrondolio wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 5:26 pm
I hear ya and see some validity in what you're saying. However, I've never met a drive I haven't filled... multiple times through its lifecycle (computer/laptops specifically, not in some other use cases in my home and business). Maybe that makes me atypical but I'd bet otherwise. Due to that fact alone I wouldn't purchase a 660P, P1, etc for my computer/laptop uses. To me, that'd be like buying a blender for a bit less money that slows to a crawl blending my smoothies when I fill the glassware. I'd much prefer to pay nearish or even identical prices for a blender that takes all my fruits and juices and blends them quickly. These are very fast, very capable drives for a pretty effective outlay vs storage vs speed comparisons at a great price.

Saying that: I purchased two cheap 1TB 660P's and put them to use in my Synology 918+ NAS as cache, sonarr-radarr-etc buffer and so on. They certainly have their uses in my home.
Did you notice the performance improved after using NVME ssds as cache? If put in one piece, will it work? Thanks!
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qianquan wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 7:13 pm
Did you notice the performance improved after using NVME ssds as cache? If put in one piece, will it work? Thanks!
When first installed I used them as Synology designed: cache, but I had other plans. As strictly cache the performance wasn't really worth it in my use cases but it did make some difference and quieted some of the thrashing I was experiencing. I mainly bought them to use as scratch/data drives for my various dockers. Synology doesn't make this procedure transparent in the least but a little shell work is all it takes to partition, format and mount them in any way you wish on boot. I really wanted them because my hard drives were being hit constantly via sonarr-radarr-etc and I wanted to prolong those expensive drives life by letting them sleep far more. So, with the current setup most of my dockers silently thrash the 660P's throughout the day letting my SHR2 volume sleep until final transfers are completed, etc. I use the SSD space in various ways. Works a treat.

I wouldn't recommend more than, say, one 512GB nvme for cache use only for the above reason (1 drive will cache reads only, 2 drives will enable write cache as well). But if at a good price: it makes sense. For really intensive NAS use they'd be invaluable as cache, of course.
Last edited by Elrondolio on Jul 30th, 2019 7:45 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Aug 12, 2015
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Is this SSD single sided or double? My lenovo laptop only has space for single.
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victor158128 wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 7:45 pm
Is this SSD single sided or double? My lenovo laptop only has space for single.
Double, so pass. You'll need more expensive drives for single sided.
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Jul 23, 2004
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Apologies for the incredibly stupid question, but I'm working on building a desktop rig with my son and I'm used to seeing a typical 2.5" SSD drive (that I've typically swapped out into my laptops). What is this type of drive? It looks like a stick of RAM. Does it require a specific adapter, i.e. not SATA? We haven't bought the motherboard or anything, so I have no idea where/how this works vs a regular SATA drive (i.e. Is this better/worse than SATA, anything I should look for?). TIA
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Bishop8 wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 8:07 pm
Apologies for the incredibly stupid question, but I'm working on building a desktop rig with my son and I'm used to seeing a typical 2.5" SSD drive (that I've typically swapped out into my laptops). What is this type of drive? It looks like a stick of RAM. Does it require a specific adapter, i.e. not SATA? We haven't bought the motherboard or anything, so I have no idea where/how this works vs a regular SATA drive (i.e. Is this better/worse than SATA, anything I should look for?). TIA
No worries! I screwed up the same thing during my build a few black Fridays ago before I knew about the different form factors, and purchased a 2.5" SSD as well... Samsung EVO line no less! Le ouch.

The search phrase you're looking for is "NVME SSD vs SATA SSD" and you'll find all the info you need Grinning Face With Smiling Eyes
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Bishop8 wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 8:07 pm
Apologies for the incredibly stupid question, but I'm working on building a desktop rig with my son and I'm used to seeing a typical 2.5" SSD drive (that I've typically swapped out into my laptops). What is this type of drive? It looks like a stick of RAM. Does it require a specific adapter, i.e. not SATA? We haven't bought the motherboard or anything, so I have no idea where/how this works vs a regular SATA drive (i.e. Is this better/worse than SATA, anything I should look for?). TIA
With a new build, any MB you buy will almost certainly have at least one M.2 connector where NVMe drives are installed. Typically these drives offer much higher theoretical performance vs SATA SSDs as well as ease of installation (and reduced clutter) since you don't need data or power cables.
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Bishop8 wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 8:07 pm
Apologies for the incredibly stupid question, but I'm working on building a desktop rig with my son and I'm used to seeing a typical 2.5" SSD drive (that I've typically swapped out into my laptops). What is this type of drive? It looks like a stick of RAM. Does it require a specific adapter, i.e. not SATA? We haven't bought the motherboard or anything, so I have no idea where/how this works vs a regular SATA drive (i.e. Is this better/worse than SATA, anything I should look for?). TIA
No stupid questions (except repeatedly repeated ones =/).

SATA drives run over the AHC interface with maximum throughput of 6 Gb/s theoretical. That translates to SATA SSDs maxing out at real-world 550 MB/s. As stated, they require mounting apart from the motherboard and require data cables and power cables.

NVMe v1.3 (like these drives) run over the PCIe 3.0 bus that is directly connected to the CPU or chipset, with up to x4 lanes. That translates to NVMe 1.3 SSDs maxing out at real-world 3500-ish MB/s. NVMe drives are mounted directly to the motherboard via M.2 slots of various sizes (2280 (80mm) being the most common in desktop/laptop land). Since they are directly connected, just like ram, again as stated they require no data or power cables. However, they can run hot as many times they don't have direct cooling or are mounted on the underside of a motherboard, etc. Some drives run cooler than others, some come with heat-spreaders, some are single sided and some are double sided so may not fit all systems, etc.

NVMe 1.4 (just being released into the wild but uncommon at this time) runs over the PCIe 4.0 bus at up to 5000+ MB/s... and more.

If you are spec'ing out and building a new AMD Ryzen system, you may want to look in to the new NVMe 1.4, PCIe 4.0 based drives. They are expensive right now but something to at least consider. Any NVMe drive will be far faster than a standard SATA SSD. Those still have their uses, of course (portability, etc).

Good luck on your build!
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Mar 31, 2008
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Airdrie
Bought one, thanks. Picked up the RAM deal and this, I guess I'm going to start building a new PC.
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Elrondolio wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 7:46 pm
Double, so pass. You'll need more expensive drives for single sided.
My question is how one is supposed to know if an NVMe PCIe Gen3x4 M.2 2280 SSD is single or double sided when the description doesn't seem to mention it? I'm pretty sure my Thinkpad X1 Extreme requires only single sided which used to be the most common and double sided SSDs were always labelled as such because they were rare. Doesn't seem to be the case anymore.
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Thanks for all the helpful comments everyone!

Trying to fit my son's budget, so I'm probably not going bleeding edge, but would this drive in the OP be a good one for a Ryzen 5 3xxx build? Haven't bought the chip or motherboard yet, but this stick should generically fit?

I ordered that Crucial RAM deal as well, so I think I'm building our system ass-backwards, haha. The pieces may not all fit, but dammit I got a good deal on everything! Smiling Face With Open Mouth And Smiling Eyes
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Great NVME
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[OP]
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Ctrl-Z wrote:
Jul 30th, 2019 10:01 pm
My question is how one is supposed to know if an NVMe PCIe Gen3x4 M.2 2280 SSD is single or double sided when the description doesn't seem to mention it? I'm pretty sure my Thinkpad X1 Extreme requires only single sided which used to be the most common and double sided SSDs were always labelled as such because they were rare. Doesn't seem to be the case anymore.
Yeah, non standard in description everywhere. These days you can guesstimate that less expensive drives will be double sided, more expensive single. But that doesn't hold up in many products so it really is asking, reading reviews and / or trying and returning.

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