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[Amazon.ca] [The Source] TP-Link EAP245 Ceiling Mount Access Point - $89.99 | EAP225 - $69.99

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Dec 26, 2010
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iTomHD wrote: So these access points take the Wi-Fi burden off your modem; but what about doing so with wired connections? I picked up 2 eap245s and will shut off wifi on my bell modem, but it will still have 30 something hard wired devices it needs to handle. Most routers tout their Wi-Fi capabilities which is a moot point when using these access points; so is there a tp-link router that blends in with the Omada software you guys use? Or any other such router suggestions?
If you have a home hub 3000, the wifi on the router is actually better than the eap245, since it supports 4x4 MU-MIMO. The routing capabilities on the router is lacklustering. You could opt to bridge it to an edgerouter X bundled with the EAP245 which would work much better overall compared to the current setup.
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Dec 24, 2011
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Expliciate wrote: If you have a home hub 3000, the wifi on the router is actually better than the eap245, since it supports 4x4 MU-MIMO. The routing capabilities on the router is lacklustering. You could opt to bridge it to an edgerouter X bundled with the EAP245 which would work much better overall compared to the current setup.
Isn’t the Edgerouter X a Ubiquiti product? Does d-link not have a comparable router?
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Apr 10, 2002
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crustydragon wrote: Can this mesh with existing UniFi Ac pro or will I run into problems? Thx!
No, it is not compatible with Ubiquiti products. It runs it's own controller software called Omada.
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iTomHD wrote: So these access points take the Wi-Fi burden off your modem; but what about doing so with wired connections? I picked up 2 eap245s and will shut off wifi on my bell modem, but it will still have 30 something hard wired devices it needs to handle. Most routers tout their Wi-Fi capabilities which is a moot point when using these access points; so is there a tp-link router that blends in with the Omada software you guys use? Or any other such router suggestions?
You can replace the home hub 3000 entirely if you want with and SFP to Ethernet adapter going to your own router and using PPPOE login. Personally I have the HH3000 with wifi turned off but still doing the routing work. 2 EAP245 and the Oc200 controller, I run 30 hardwired devices and about 15 wifi, some are run off a separate clan for IoT devices. I added a net gear PoE switch to power the APs and controller to keep things clean.
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Should I stagger these if I place them on each floor, or directly above each other?

Thinking one in the basement, closer to the backyard.
One in the main floor hallway and one upstairs hallway closer to the front, I have a balcony lookout hallway.
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Apr 10, 2002
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Your proposed plan sounds sensible.
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rebel_rfd wrote: Should I stagger these if I place them on each floor, or directly above each other?

Thinking one in the basement, closer to the backyard.
One in the main floor hallway and one upstairs hallway closer to the front, I have a balcony lookout hallway.
Yes, stagger them and then reduce the power levels so they don’t interfere with each other. You want power as low as possible, yet still gives a good signal. Trial and error to set them.
Use different channels for each AP also.
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iTomHD wrote: Isn’t the Edgerouter X a Ubiquiti product? Does d-link not have a comparable router?
No, d-link does not have a comparable product. The edgerouter X is also the most cost-effective and better-performing routers that can properly manage gigabit up and down speeds with hardware offloading. Most consumer-grade routers can't under the price-point of $200. Even the AC86U requires NAT acceleration enabled to manage gigabit speeds.
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Dec 24, 2011
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AstonM wrote: You can replace the home hub 3000 entirely if you want with and SFP to Ethernet adapter going to your own router and using PPPOE login. Personally I have the HH3000 with wifi turned off but still doing the routing work. 2 EAP245 and the Oc200 controller, I run 30 hardwired devices and about 15 wifi, some are run off a separate clan for IoT devices. I added a net gear PoE switch to power the APs and controller to keep things clean.
Fibre to the home isn’t available in my neighbourhood yet, so no SFP:/
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Dec 24, 2011
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Expliciate wrote: No, d-link does not have a comparable product. The edgerouter X is also the most cost-effective and better-performing routers that can properly manage gigabit up and down speeds with hardware offloading. Most consumer-grade routers can't under the price-point of $200. Even the AC86U requires NAT acceleration enabled to manage gigabit speeds.
While fibre to the home isn’t available here yet, which edge router would you suggest with future proofing in mind?
F2B995CB-ABEF-416C-AC08-F97B87C20BB7.jpeg
Last edited by iTomHD on Oct 18th, 2020 1:48 pm, edited 1 time in total.
[OP]
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Aug 4, 2006
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iTomHD wrote: Fibre to the home isn’t available in my neighbourhood yet, so no SFP:/

You should be able to use any router then. PPPOE login and you're good to go.
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Oct 28, 2019
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Take a look at Mikrotik as well. They generally offer a ton of options compared to similarly priced other devices. Plus you don't need a controller manage these devices and there are 3rd party developers who have created plugins to extend the functionality of Mikrotik devices.
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Jul 16, 2019
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Just bought one. Can I manage this remotely? Also curious how to do remote reboot as was previously mentioned by some here?
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Nov 21, 2002
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Expliciate wrote: No, d-link does not have a comparable product. The edgerouter X is also the most cost-effective and better-performing routers that can properly manage gigabit up and down speeds with hardware offloading. Most consumer-grade routers can't under the price-point of $200. Even the AC86U requires NAT acceleration enabled to manage gigabit speeds.
hardware offloading = "off load to hardware". They are basically same thing as nat accelerated they both mean relying on hardware accelerated functions to work. What they both do is use embedded hardware accelerated protocols to meet gigabit rates. The problem lies with traffic shaping as there are no ways to do that on hardware alone as its too inflexible with multiple simulateous connections so its all on the raw power of the soc and the edge-x is just an old mtk dual core mips at 800mhz but does support hyperthreading. Its no where near as powerful as ac86u which is a dualcore 1.8ghz soc that can traffic shape at about double what the edge-x can on its soc

My dlink 860l b1 is the exact same soc as the edge-x. So is the xiaomi 3g router both fairly cheap 60 cad routers that also offer internal wifi if needed and both can be flashed run openwrt to support most types of traffic shaping and perform exactly like the edge-x when running openwrt.
iTomHD wrote: So these access points take the Wi-Fi burden off your modem; but what about doing so with wired connections? I picked up 2 eap245s and will shut off wifi on my bell modem, but it will still have 30 something hard wired devices it needs to handle. Most routers tout their Wi-Fi capabilities which is a moot point when using these access points; so is there a tp-link router that blends in with the Omada software you guys use? Or any other such router suggestions?
handling what? and going where? home use or commercial?

handling traffic between 30 clients is nothing within the local network.

Handling traffic between 30 demanding clients to the internet at the same time at the isp subscription rate where the lower the subscription rate the harsher the conditions? Well That's called bufferbloat and can only be improved by traffic shaping. Eap controller software can't fix that at wan thats all on the router.

Now what router can shape traffic connections well enough to lower bufferbloat@wan the best?? That would be measured by what program manages with sqm the best and currently that's "piece of cake". Now what router natively supports cake and hits the fastest rate= thats your answer. Time to get googling.

But currently and cost wise. No router can do it with any type of hardware accel enabled. If you need offloading enabled to hit gigabit rate on your router your sol. Right now only x86 can. But rpi4 can hit 500-700 mbps and even a53 quadcores can upto 500-700 too depending on raw ghz and control of allocating duties to certain cores

2 answers for home users.

1) The simplest but most expensive and short term solution. Buy a true guaranteed works at gigabit rate both ways isp package for home users should suffice as there will be ample bandwidth available at wan for internet for the typical home user with alot of varying duties.

2) those who can't get true gigabit isp. Openwrt supported router enable "sqm piece of cake" that can max your isp package and clients. So a popular edge-x which is a dualcore mips mtk soc. Maxes around 100mbps wan to lan with offloading disabled. Fine for sub 100mbps isp packages. Add a gigabit switch where all your local clients connect directly to that and between them the switch will negotiate gigabit rates instead should suffice. Above 100mbps which I think the common isp package is advertised 300-500mbps. You need an arm a53 soc or x86 router that can run "cake". Gigiabit isp packages for home can get away with it do to ample available bandwidth for now.

It depends equally on your needs vs just having the best types of sqm/traffic shaping. Otherwise your just over paying beyond your usage.That' s why you'll see brands offering their own version of traffic shaping to help. example asus's "sqm qos" and might suffice for your needs. Or f_codel is very good and little less taxing than piece of cake so its a fair trade off. You wouldn't need to pay more to support cake if you can get by with an acceptable rate using a simpler traffic shaping program your hardware currently supports?

The slower the isp rate the better the traffic shaping program your gonna need for your clients. The more powerful soc the better the able to shape traffic at higher rates.
https://www.bufferbloat.net/projects/
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iTomHD wrote: While fibre to the home isn’t available here yet, which edge router would you suggest with future proofing in mind?
F2B995CB-ABEF-416C-AC08-F97B87C20BB7.jpeg
The ER-X without SFP should be plenty for most household use up till gigabit speeds.
lead wrote: hardware offloading = "off load to hardware"....
Sure, I'm aware that it is essentially hardware acceleration mumbled over marketing terminology. Sure if you want to compare pure SoC from product to product, there are plenty of consumer-grade routers that have a better chip than the ER-X. The problem is the implementation, where you would have to go out of your way to flash OpenWRT or other 3rd party firmware to mitigate.

At the end of the day, I don't think 90% of RFD cares about the technicalities along with tinkering around unofficial methods to get the job done.
The ER-X can deliver similar performance that can manage gigabit internet for the cheap $70 price tag, stock firmware without all the fuss and trouble.

It gets the job done well, and is cheap.

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