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TP-Link mesh Routers upto 30% off priced between $99 - $450

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  • Dec 14th, 2021 9:45 am
Thread Summary
Looking to upgrade your WiFi? RFD Reviews has a roundup of the best mesh routers!
31 replies
Sr. Member
User avatar
Nov 24, 2009
635 posts
98 upvotes
Fergus, ON
Careful with these, there are a few review like the following:
OMG! Please DON'T read Terms of Services if you want to use these. It's simply crazy. By using this product, you literally authorise TP-Link to correct ALL your personal information and share it with credit companies, any kind of third parties and ship your info anywhere in the world, including China.

I quote : "Information may be held at our offices and those of our group companies, service providers, credit reference check agencies, representatives and agents as described above. Information may be transferred internationally to China, the United States of America and other countries around the world, for the reasons described above. "

This shouldn't even be legal.
https://www.amazon.ca/gp/customer-reviews/RM4FFYIIQZ314/ref=cm_cr_dp_d_rvw_ttl?ie=UTF8&ASIN=B07NF6V8SC
If it weren't for electricity, we would all be surfing RFD by candlelight.
Newbie
Aug 23, 2020
24 posts
71 upvotes
That's is sketchy! Never expected a company with such credibility doing this. I guess this is a good example of how and why not to trust any company/product blindly unless you carefully read all the terms and conditions, no matter how popular it is.
Deal Addict
Oct 17, 2002
1201 posts
295 upvotes
Oakville
Arent all of these like this? Eero is no different: (https://dongknows.com/amazon-eero-pro-6 ... er-review/)

"Specifically, it must connect to the vendor’s server, and the user then manages it via a mobile app that also works via the same server. You can’t even set your eero up without first logging in via your eero account. And, among other things, when there’s no Internet, you can’t make changes to your home network.

In other words, everything that goes through your home eero potentially goes through its maker. The company prides itself on using (technical) information from users to improve its product over time.

Here’s the company’s lengthy privacy policy in case you have time. Among other things, the gist is eero wants you to believe that it won’t collect user activities. And I’m not here to suggest one way or another.

But privacy is not what a third party says they will do but what they can do. Or, in this case, what you let them do.

Would you allow a plumber access to your bathroom at all times just because they promise that they’ll look only at the pipes? Oh, how about checking with them each time you want to use or make changes to the bathroom? It’s your bathroom. Think about it! Maybe consider another plumber?"
Member
User avatar
Mar 16, 2005
265 posts
25 upvotes
Ms. iSauga
What personal information are you giving out anyways to use these products?
Sr. Member
Apr 24, 2011
509 posts
229 upvotes
Scarborough
Anyone have experience with these?

People have suggested to get a mesh wifi system to me but there are such mixed reviews on Amazon. Someone even mentioned a dedicated router provided more stability/range/speeds than the cheaper mesh systems.

My modem is in the basement and I struggle to stream 4K to the TV on main floor. Wifi periodically cuts out in the bedroom but other than that the Rogers modem seems to work 90% of the time

Using Fido 150 internet plan
Newbie
May 25, 2010
48 posts
21 upvotes
Mississauga
nims232 wrote: What personal information are you giving out anyways to use these products?
From what it sounds like to me is any web traffic and local network traffic is being monitored. I wish I knew this before spending over $300 on their mesh system.
Deal Addict
Aug 26, 2008
1073 posts
741 upvotes
Montreal
amoote wrote: This is why I don't use TP-link products
This is why people should avoid where possible cloud based products. Even if a company is well-intentioned today, who knows what data they're holding and who will own it a few years from now. And they make it increasingly compelling to release more and more information, which is altogether unnecessary if consumers look for alternatives.

As far as I know, Netgear and Asus make the only consumer mesh systems that don't require a cloud service.
Member
Nov 9, 2021
491 posts
916 upvotes
davidm wrote: This is why people should avoid where possible cloud based products. Even if a company is well-intentioned today, who knows what data they're holding and who will own it a few years from now. And they make it increasingly compelling to release more and more information, which is altogether unnecessary if consumers look for alternatives.

As far as I know, Netgear and Asus make the only consumer mesh systems that don't require a cloud service.
Thanks, going to replace out tp-link decos with the netgear orbi.

Seems the rbk23 is one of the most recommended systems.
Member
User avatar
Mar 16, 2005
265 posts
25 upvotes
Ms. iSauga
Cloud is here to stay. You don't have to rule out a product/service just because it is cloud based. I suspect they might be storing the configuration information of your router.

I highly doubt that they are monitoring your web traffic. There are so many other players who might be doing that regardless of what router you have. ;-)
Newbie
Sep 1, 2018
90 posts
95 upvotes
axis81 wrote: Anyone have experience with these?

People have suggested to get a mesh wifi system to me but there are such mixed reviews on Amazon. Someone even mentioned a dedicated router provided more stability/range/speeds than the cheaper mesh systems.

My modem is in the basement and I struggle to stream 4K to the TV on main floor. Wifi periodically cuts out in the bedroom but other than that the Rogers modem seems to work 90% of the time

Using Fido 150 internet plan
I have a 3-pack of TP-Link X20 (AX1800) for a month now and love the product. Yesterday I was in the forest and could barely see my house and it would still connect on wifi, very impressed with the range. No connection drop or anything, so far no complaint. The cool thing IMO is the backhaul which you can wire your PC, TV or another Deco.

Just a quick note, I am not an advanced user, I just plugged everything and changed the password.
Sr. Member
Apr 24, 2011
509 posts
229 upvotes
Scarborough
LaurentD88313 wrote: I have a 3-pack of TP-Link X20 (AX1800) for a month now and love the product. Yesterday I was in the forest and could barely see my house and it would still connect on wifi, very impressed with the range. No connection drop or anything, so far no complaint. The cool thing IMO is the backhaul which you can wire your PC, TV or another Deco.

Just a quick note, I am not an advanced user, I just plugged everything and changed the password.
That's some crazy range! Though it looks like you have their premium product so I assume it probably has more range than this entry level E4 AC1200 package?

Did some research and it seems the DECO E4 3-tower package is limited to 100MBPS whereas DECO M4 2-tower package supports gigabit speeds. Both are about the same price.
Newbie
Sep 1, 2018
90 posts
95 upvotes
axis81 wrote: That's some crazy range! Though it looks like you have their premium product so I assume it probably has more range than this entry level E4 AC1200 package?
It's also close to perfect conditions, since I don't have neighbours and trees that would block the signal. I doubt to have the same success in my old appartment with tons of other wifi around and walls all over the place.
Newbie
May 28, 2009
36 posts
18 upvotes
Hamilton, ON
Perfect timing, need an upgrade.
But I see Asus is also on sale - TP-Link AX5400 or Asus RT-AX58U? Can anyone comment? We're in a standard subdivision with lots of wifi networks around and 2 teenagers streaming lots of nonsense
TIA
Member
Jan 23, 2014
294 posts
199 upvotes
Markham
MrPaul wrote: Perfect timing, need an upgrade.
But I see Asus is also on sale - TP-Link AX5400 or Asus RT-AX58U? Can anyone comment? We're in a standard subdivision with lots of wifi networks around and 2 teenagers streaming lots of nonsense
TIA
Nesh has better range but router might be a bit faster(also depends on chipset)
Deal Addict
Sep 19, 2015
2255 posts
862 upvotes
Kleinburg, ON.
All this talk about what your router may be sending to its manufacturer, meanwhile, no one is remotely talking about what your ISP is tracking. Afterall, your ISP is your primary gateway to the Internet. How do you think folks who use public torrent trackers gets those cease and desist letters? Who else but your ISP has your web traffic data and your contact info?
Member
Nov 9, 2021
491 posts
916 upvotes
JKKim2983 wrote: All this talk about what your router may be sending to its manufacturer, meanwhile, no one is remotely talking about what your ISP is tracking. Afterall, your ISP is your primary gateway to the Internet. How do you think folks who use public torrent trackers gets those cease and desist letters? Who else but your ISP has your web traffic data and your contact info?
You get the letters because the copyright entity has been logging your IP address in the torrent swarm and forwards the letter request to whichever ISP owns the IP. The ISPs are not interested in logging torrent data to send letters.

This is not to say ISPs can’t track things but please don’t spread false info to keep the defeatist attitude running. If we can buy from an OEM who respects privacy, we should.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 20, 2016
2515 posts
2404 upvotes
Toronto
LaurentD88313 wrote: I have a 3-pack of TP-Link X20 (AX1800) for a month now and love the product. Yesterday I was in the forest and could barely see my house and it would still connect on wifi, very impressed with the range. No connection drop or anything, so far no complaint. The cool thing IMO is the backhaul which you can wire your PC, TV or another Deco.

Just a quick note, I am not an advanced user, I just plugged everything and changed the password.
I don't want to be the "ackchyually" guy - but I think what you're saying as "backhaul" is just the ethernet port. Backhaul is just the connection between the main node to the satellite ones. (or the subsequent closer satellite to the further satellite, depending on your topology...)

Just chipping in this because it's fairly meaningful when talking about mesh systems.

Your nodes are only as good as your backhaul.
If you connect them on the wire (normally a gigabit ethernet wire/cable) - they'll have a very low latency, super broad bandwidth, and minimal (close to zero drops/overhead);

But most of the Mesh systems make proper sense when used wirelessly (network-wise, obviously still connected to power); Then we have 2 types of backhaul, dedicated and shared.
Dedicated is good, because you having one band to your nodes talk to themselves, and the other(s) left for your devices. Most of tri-bands are like this, as you can use the 3rd band as backhaul.
Shared isn't the best, as you're using the same lanes for your nodes and your devices, which may simply "not be enough". Dual-bands don't have the luxury of keep one band as backhaul, so they normally share the 5ghz one with the backhaul.


As for range, while it's satisfying seeing your phone with all 3 bars/arcs, might remember that your phone also need to be powerful enough to send signals back to the router

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