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[Amazon Canada] TP-Link TL-PA9020P 2-Port Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Adapter Kit $99.99

  • Last Updated:
  • Aug 18th, 2019 9:55 am
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Aug 10, 2019
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Toronto

[Amazon Canada] TP-Link TL-PA9020P 2-Port Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Adapter Kit $99.99

Amazon CA has TP-Link TL-PA9020P 2-Port Gigabit Passthrough Powerline Adapter Kit for only $99.99 w/ free shipping
The TL-PA9020P Powerline Kit equips any room with blazing fast internet by transforming your outlets into Ethernet ports for reliable wired connection to all of your devices, no matter how far from your router.
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15 replies
Member
Jul 21, 2016
493 posts
759 upvotes
Leask
Never trust the speed rating on those. It assume a brand new home with off-the-grid new wires and nothing else plugged in.
Member
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Jul 29, 2010
239 posts
340 upvotes
Montreal
Moca adapters are more stable.
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Apr 2, 2008
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GTA
dazurn wrote:
Aug 17th, 2019 1:23 pm
Moca adapters are more stable.
This, or simply run some wires if possible.

I know people buying these adapters claim they cannot run wires. Just think over and over again and try. You might come up with an idea. Believe me, it happened to me, yes myself. I finally got a wire from basement to G/F and 2/F. i am now a happy camper.
¸

- - - - -
;)
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Nov 13, 2007
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I have the AV2000, and realistically, you're only going to get anywhere from 10 to 20% of the rated speed. I get about 120 Mbps which is fine since I use the powerline adapters to create a backhaul for my access points. Other than a power failure where I had to resync the units, they're solid units.
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Aug 4, 2006
2622 posts
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Toronto
+1 for doing everything to run an ethernet cable first. Then Moca if you already have coax running. Then these.
Last edited by AstonM on Aug 17th, 2019 3:03 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Dec 24, 2008
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Belle River
AstonM wrote:
Aug 17th, 2019 2:08 pm
+1 for doing everything to run a man Ethernet cable first. Then Moca if you already have coax running. Then these.
Any recommendations for moca devices?
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Jan 21, 2018
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InvaIid wrote:
Aug 17th, 2019 1:16 pm
Never trust the speed rating on those. It assume a brand new home with off-the-grid new wires and nothing else plugged in.
Actually those factors have little to do with it. The main factors reducing powerline ethernet speed to a fraction of the nominal maximum are:

1. Phase separation: you probably have a least two power phases wired in your house, and there is no physical connection between them, leaving only weak RF coupling at the breaker panel. If your adapters are plugged into two different phases, you will get terrible throughput. This is why you have to experiment with different outlets.

2. Distance through the wiring. Powerline ethernet high-frequency signals degrade over distance, so you will only get maximum speed between two adapters plugged into the same wall outlet a few inches apart. Each 50' or so through the wires probably cuts it in half, and of course going through additional connections and contacts reduces the signal strength still further. New higher speed models using higher frequency are more prone to distance drop-offs.

3. Certain specific items plugged into nearby outlets. Many things that you could plug into AC outlets have a bad effect on high-frequency signals, partially shorting them out. Protection circuits and neon lamps for example are bad. The nearer they are to your adapter outlet on the circuit, the worse the effect, especially if they are plugged into the same outlet.

4. Interference on the line in the powerline ethernet frequency band, which can come from defective devices leaking high-frequency signals onto the power line, or from another home nearby using powerline ethernet, or other external sources. For example some recent city streetlamps use powerline ethernet control signals in the same frequency band.

Powerline ethernet protocol has a fairly high overhead error-checking-and-correcting protocol to deal with the noisy environment, and that already cuts the effective speed significantly.

The latest generation use 3-prong plugs and have two separate channels between hot-neutral and hot-ground, which helps improve the throughput and work around interference that only affects one channel. The older 2-prong adapters could only use the single hot-neutral channel.

But overall you are lucky to get about 25-30% of the rated speed between two widely-separated outlets in your house.
Last edited by Scote64 on Aug 18th, 2019 12:29 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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Sep 23, 2010
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AstonM wrote:
Aug 17th, 2019 2:08 pm
+1 for doing everything to run a man Ethernet cable first. Then Moca if you already have coax running. Then these.
Ethernet, moca, Deca then these. :)
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Jul 29, 2010
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Montreal
hystavito wrote:
Aug 17th, 2019 2:30 pm
Any recommendations for moca devices?
These are the ones I use.

Actiontec Bonded MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Adapter, 2 Pack (ECB6200K02), Black https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B013J7O3X0/ref ... wDb7G2SB9H

The Zyxel ones are cheaper but not shipped by Amazon.

ZyXEL MoCA 2.0 Ethernet to Coax Single Adapter Bonded Up to 1.4Gbps Gigabit Ethernet (HLA4205) https://www.amazon.ca/dp/B07D8Y4N5J/ref ... wDbK7TYQWW
Last edited by dazurn on Aug 17th, 2019 3:05 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Deal Addict
Aug 4, 2006
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taank wrote:
Aug 17th, 2019 3:03 pm
wow did not realize that these so expensive..
They will do true gigabit though. Bell gave me some Arris G.hn coax adapters for my 4K box and I have speed tested it.
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Sep 22, 2012
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I reach around 60Mbps with this unit.

Not as fast as I was hoping for, but good enough for typical use.

I still keep a Wi-Fi adapter around for when I do larger downloads.
Newbie
Dec 9, 2017
28 posts
15 upvotes
I have another TP-Link Powerline Adapter. I consistently get 70 Mbps, which is my Fido connection speed, for Internet speed tests. Never tested LAN though. Can't be happier.

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