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[Amazon.ca] Venus Induction Capable Espresso Coffee Maker, Stainless Steel, 6 cup. | 32% Off | $39.97

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  • Oct 8th, 2020 10:59 am
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Sr. Member
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Jun 10, 2004
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1190 upvotes
Toronto

[Amazon.ca] Venus Induction Capable Espresso Coffee Maker, Stainless Steel, 6 cup. | 32% Off | $39.97

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  • Makes 6 espresso cups = 10 fl. oz.
  • Stainless Steel construction good for all heat sources including induction. Not Dishwasher Safe
  • Ready in 4-5 minutes
  • Fits right on the stovetop
  • Features a black nylon heat-resistant handle

-Callahan-

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20 replies
Newbie
Jan 1, 2019
47 posts
88 upvotes
I have this, great little moka pot. Used for over a year now and looks great still. I’d recommend pre boiling water and pre heating the stove , so you spend as little time heating the grounds up unnecessarily.
Jr. Member
Dec 19, 2018
120 posts
137 upvotes
Montreal
harold_callahan wrote: Not Dishwasher Safe
You shouldn't wash it with dish soap at all. Just rinse it with hot water and your coffee will taste better and better!
Thank me later...
You friendly neighborhood italian guy.
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Jun 6, 2010
6745 posts
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Toronto, Ontario
AndreaL87013 wrote: You shouldn't wash it with dish soap at all. Just rinse it with hot water and your coffee will taste better and better!
Thank me later...
You friendly neighborhood italian guy.
Why would it tastes better and better?
If I buy something that is not in deep discounted, my father will punish me; everyone will laugh at me. I will be the strange kid who doesn't fit in.
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Deal Addict
User avatar
Mar 8, 2006
2719 posts
433 upvotes
Toronto
theflyingsquirrel wrote: Why would it tastes better and better?
My understanding is the layers of coffee stain which eventually turn black offset the metallic taste. I have a bialetti and occasionally wash with soap because I'm not used to not doing so. (I'm not Italian.)
Sr. Member
Apr 18, 2017
583 posts
1152 upvotes
AndreaL87013 wrote: You shouldn't wash it with dish soap at all. Just rinse it with hot water and your coffee will taste better and better!
Thank me later...
You friendly neighborhood italian guy.
You should thoroughly clean it. Old coffee acids will alter future flavors and water cannot clean off the acids alone. If you don't properly clean it, it will affect flavor in the long run.

That being said, for the brand this is a great price!
Jr. Member
Dec 19, 2018
120 posts
137 upvotes
Montreal
theflyingsquirrel wrote:
Why would it tastes better and better?
pipolchap wrote: My understanding is the layers of coffee stain which eventually turn black offset the metallic taste. I have a bialetti and occasionally wash with soap because I'm not used to not doing so. (I'm not Italian.)
Yes, that's one reason. More or less the same principle of the bad coffee taste when using a new machine and you need to prepare some before having a good one.
Also another reason is that some parts (the filter and the kind of small pipe in the upper part) are completely closed so some residual soap could remain inside them and then carried by boiling water when it flows through them negatively affecting the coffee taste.
I'd like to add that Bialetti is the leader brand for production of moka pots and even if in Italy they are much cheaper, I think it's a fairly good price for something that, if it's well taken care of, can last tens of years.
Jr. Member
Dec 19, 2018
120 posts
137 upvotes
Montreal
User131439 wrote: You should thoroughly clean it. Old coffee acids will alter future flavors and water cannot clean off the acids alone. If you don't properly clean it, it will affect flavor in the long run.

That being said, for the brand this is a great price!
For sure every once in a while, especially if it's too much stained you could, but I'm not really sure about your statement. Do you have something to support your theory?
I don't think coffee bars usually wash coffee machines with soap after preparing each coffee.
Member
Jul 31, 2007
339 posts
217 upvotes
Whats the difference between this and a regular moka pot?
Jr. Member
Dec 19, 2018
120 posts
137 upvotes
Montreal
MtX wrote: What's the proper steps for making coffee this way?

Is this guide pretty accurate? https://www.javapresse.com/blogs/stovet ... pot-coffee

Slow brewing at low-medium temp, and pouring immediately when you hear the liquid gurgle (so that you don't pour out the last 5% which may contain grinds.
I'd say it's pretty accurate.
Every family has its own traditions and believes. What I use to do is using hot water from the sink (don't need to boil it before if you are not in a rush) and fill the chamber just below the valve.
Then put coffee powder (I use Lavazza's ones because are produced to be used with a moka too, but you can use whatever brand you want) in the filter without pressing it (if you do the moka may explode if the valve fails).
The guide you linked says to level the cofee powder with a knife but I use to put a teaspoon more so it is just slightly under pressure when closing it and the coffee you get is a bit more intense.
Finally set the skillet at low/medium heat. The water in the chamber shouldn't actually boil during the process, but just build pressure to push hot water through the filter. The temperature of boiling water is indeed too high and extracts bitter compounds from the coffee (kind of burned taste). For the same reason, when it starts to gorgle you have to remove it right away from the skillet to lower the temperature. Some water should always remain in the chamber and the upper part shoulnd't be completely full of coffee.
Anyway all of these are just suggestions based both on science and family traditions. Feel free to experiment a bit.
Also, the coffee coming out from a moka pot will never be a real espresso (water pressure and powder compactness are not high enough). It's not as dense and intense as the espresso coming from a coffee machine, but it's something between that and standard black coffee.
Deal Fanatic
Aug 15, 2003
8444 posts
212 upvotes
Toronto
AndreaL87013 wrote: I'd say it's pretty accurate.
Every family has its own traditions and believes. What I use to do is using hot water from the sink (don't need to boil it before if you are not in a rush) and fill the chamber just below the valve.
Then put coffee powder (I use Lavazza's ones because are produced to be used with a moka too, but you can use whatever brand you want) in the filter without pressing it (if you do the moka may explode if the valve fails).
The guide you linked says to level the cofee powder with a knife but I use to put a teaspoon more so it is just slightly under pressure when closing it and the coffee you get is a bit more intense.
Finally set the skillet at low/medium heat. The water in the chamber shouldn't actually boil during the process, but just build pressure to push hot water through the filter. The temperature of boiling water is indeed too high and extracts bitter compounds from the coffee (kind of burned taste). For the same reason, when it starts to gorgle you have to remove it right away from the skillet to lower the temperature. Some water should always remain in the chamber and the upper part shoulnd't be completely full of coffee.
Anyway all of these are just suggestions based both on science and family traditions. Feel free to experiment a bit.
Also, the coffee coming out from a moka pot will never be a real espresso (water pressure and powder compactness are not high enough). It's not as dense and intense as the espresso coming from a coffee machine, but it's something between that and standard black coffee.
Thanks. Nice to know. Do I even try to use espresso roast beans or just stick with regular dark roast...... I am coming from a Breville espresso machine from my previous residence
Member
May 18, 2018
354 posts
289 upvotes
User131439 wrote: You should thoroughly clean it. Old coffee acids will alter future flavors and water cannot clean off the acids alone. If you don't properly clean it, it will affect flavor in the long run.

That being said, for the brand this is a great price!
I think it says to periodically clean it with vinegar, there's a process explained in the manual. I definitely wouldn't wash it with soap each washing, only use warm water, that's it.

Also if you really want the best tasting moka pot coffee you gotta have a decent grinder and fresh beans. Lots of people buy these moka pots and expect them to do magic with preground stale coffee, not gonna happen. You have to get the grind right, if you try to use drip grind size it will not come out good in a moka pot. A moka pot grind size is somewhere between espresso grind and drip, you have to dial in the sweet spot on your grinder.
Sr. Member
Dec 3, 2005
691 posts
668 upvotes
S
johncraven wrote: Whats the difference between this and a regular moka pot?
stainless steel, not aluminum, so induction-compatible.
Jr. Member
Dec 19, 2018
120 posts
137 upvotes
Montreal
MtX wrote: Thanks. Nice to know. Do I even try to use espresso roast beans or just stick with regular dark roast...... I am coming from a Breville espresso machine from my previous residence
If you don't have a grinder I suggest you to try with espresso ones... you can find some grinds on the bottom of the cup after drinking your coffee but you shouldn't be able to feel them in your mouth.
You can try "Crema e gusto" or "Qualità Rossa" from Lavazza. They are cheap enough and you can easily find them at every supermarket. Even if it's suggested to use with a coffee machine, it's ok for the moka as you can see from the picture on the package.
Every italian brand sells coffee to be used with a moka, since it's the standard way to drink coffee at home in Italy. So I'd say you can stick with them at the beginning and try different mixes from there.
I didn't have a good experience with Cimo though.

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