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(Warm) AmazonBasics AAA Rechargeable Batteries (12-Pack) - $13.29

  • Last Updated:
  • Sep 19th, 2021 4:45 pm
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
Oct 9, 2019
44 posts
433 upvotes
Kitchener, ON

[Amazon.ca] (Warm) AmazonBasics AAA Rechargeable Batteries (12-Pack) - $13.29

Size: AAA
# of Batteries: 12
Rated Capacity: 800 mAh

These go on sale every couple of months. Supposedly they are one of the best budget batteries. I did consider the EBL ones but the NY Times article suggested otherwise, due to the performance not being as good even though they have more mAh

https://www.nytimes.com/wirecutter/reviews/best-rechargeable-batteries/
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77 replies
Newbie
Jul 13, 2016
82 posts
159 upvotes
I can't believe anyone buys non-rechargeable batteries. Even if you only recharge these things 10 times then lose them, that's like 120 batteries.

Of course alkalines peak at maybe 1000 mAh and these are 800, so you have to derate by 20%. So this is more like buying 96 AAA batteries for 13 bucks.

They're *more* recyclable than Alkaline, but they're also more fragile - if they're punctured they tend to burn, not just leak, so I guess there's at least one disadvantage.
Deal Addict
Mar 12, 2016
1112 posts
2071 upvotes
soupmaster666 wrote: I can't believe anyone buys non-rechargeable batteries. Even if you only recharge these things 10 times then lose them, that's like 120 batteries.

Of course alkalines peak at maybe 1000 mAh and these are 800, so you have to derate by 20%. So this is more like buying 96 AAA batteries for 13 bucks.

They're *more* recyclable than Alkaline, but they're also more fragile - if they're punctured they tend to burn, not just leak, so I guess there's at least one disadvantage.
The biggest disadvantage, time and effort, which everyone places different value on
Deal Addict
Jan 28, 2007
1060 posts
504 upvotes
sushibucket wrote: The biggest disadvantage, time and effort, which everyone places different value on
so there is no "time & effort" involved in using non-rechargeable batteries.?
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 15, 2008
2977 posts
2120 upvotes
Victoria
soupmaster666 wrote: I can't believe anyone buys non-rechargeable batteries.
In general, I agree. But there are some products that don't work with rechargeables. In my personal experience, this includes water sprinkler timers and wireless microphones. I've been using NiMh in nearly every home device for the past 10+ years. It pained me to buy alkalines for my sprinkler!
Deal Addict
Feb 19, 2017
4143 posts
2682 upvotes
Vancouver
sushibucket wrote: The biggest disadvantage, time and effort, which everyone places different value on
There is really no time or effort required in recharging. You just take them out like you would need to anyways and if you are smart you pre charge some in advance to do the swap. Charging is really just plug the charger into an outlet and removing it a few hours later. Not exactly much effort. It’s no different than charger s toothbrush or shaver
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 24, 2009
1160 posts
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Montreal
soupmaster666 wrote: I can't believe anyone buys non-rechargeable batteries. Even if you only recharge these things 10 times then lose them, that's like 120 batteries.
Convenience.

Wireless alarm sensors, wireless mice, remotes, kitchen scales eat through NimH charges like crazy. Then you need to have charged ones on hand as they tend to discharge, which means getting out the battery tester then having to charge them.

And having to do this a lot…
Member
Oct 14, 2007
415 posts
468 upvotes
Thedford
Thanks O.P.

Just ordered two packs. I've had good performance from the older Japanese made Basics cells, which some suspect were re-badged Eneloops. I have never used these new batteries before, but at a little over a dollar a battery how bad can they be? So I'll give them a try.

I will use them in Panasonic phones, LED flashlight and remotes. At least they won't leak.
Member
User avatar
Dec 29, 2008
396 posts
458 upvotes
Mississauga
randomroyalty wrote: Convenience.

Wireless alarm sensors, wireless mice, remotes, kitchen scales eat through NimH charges like crazy. Then you need to have charged ones on hand as they tend to discharge, which means getting out the battery tester then having to charge them.

And having to do this a lot…
the discharge of rechargeable battery has pretty much been solved by all the low self discharge batteries, eg these amazon basic ones and eneloop.
Deal Addict
Mar 12, 2016
1112 posts
2071 upvotes
Paigne wrote: There is really no time or effort required in recharging. You just take them out like you would need to anyways and if you are smart you pre charge some in advance to do the swap. Charging is really just plug the charger into an outlet and removing it a few hours later. Not exactly much effort. It’s no different than charger s toothbrush or shaver
I can tell you after working 70 hours a week, I don't even want to do that, I'd rather spend the time on redflagdeals ;D
Sr. Member
Feb 18, 2010
928 posts
399 upvotes
Greely
cooper83 wrote: In general, I agree. But there are some products that don't work with rechargeables. In my personal experience, this includes water sprinkler timers and wireless microphones. I've been using NiMh in nearly every home device for the past 10+ years. It pained me to buy alkalines for my sprinkler!
The OP posted alkaline rechargeables. I believe these are 1.5 volts when charged, but IDK how many cycles they will last...
Sr. Member
User avatar
Aug 21, 2014
605 posts
179 upvotes
Reading conflicting info online on how to determine the odds of a battery leaking. What do you think?
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
Oct 9, 2019
44 posts
433 upvotes
Kitchener, ON
ebms5000 wrote: Any recommendations for a charger?
I have Nitecore D4 $44.99. A bit overkill but it's a pretty good brand (I always try to get a good one if I'm only buying it once in my life). If you want something a little bit cheaper try the Nitecore New i4 Currently it's out of stock and only sold by third parties but normally is $26
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Last edited by Dealbyte on Sep 14th, 2021 12:39 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Member
Oct 14, 2007
415 posts
468 upvotes
Thedford
ebms5000 wrote: Any recommendations for a charger?
Lots of charges out there of varying quality. You want one that reliably senses when the battery is charged, some don't always do that very well and can overcharge the cell reducing its life. If you can find a Maha Powerex C9000 they are very good. A cheap Panasonic will work nicely too.

Good Luck

https://www.amazon.ca/Panasonic-BQ-CC17 ... 117&sr=8-7
[OP]
Newbie
User avatar
Oct 9, 2019
44 posts
433 upvotes
Kitchener, ON
old sparks wrote: The OP posted alkaline rechargeables. I believe these are 1.5 volts when charged, but IDK how many cycles they will last...
Actually it's NiMH I got a bit confused too at first when it stated

- Brings together very best capabilities of AAA alkaline (ready to use) and rechargeable (reusable) batteries

But further down it states its NiMH
Sr. Member
Feb 14, 2006
858 posts
999 upvotes
Hammonds Plains
ebms5000 wrote: Any recommendations for a charger?
https://www.ikea.com/ca/en/p/stenkol-ba ... -50506525/

Panasonic also makes a similar one. They have a bundle with enloops at a reasonable price too. Basically - single cell charging is the goal. If you need 2 batteries to initiate a charge run from it. You can look for reviews, Ladda YH-990BF was what I was originally looking for
Jr. Member
Jan 4, 2010
188 posts
142 upvotes
soupmaster666 wrote: I can't believe anyone buys non-rechargeable batteries. Even if you only recharge these things 10 times then lose them, that's like 120 batteries.

Of course alkalines peak at maybe 1000 mAh and these are 800, so you have to derate by 20%. So this is more like buying 96 AAA batteries for 13 bucks.

They're *more* recyclable than Alkaline, but they're also more fragile - if they're punctured they tend to burn, not just leak, so I guess there's at least one disadvantage.
Eh, there are some devices that won't work - rechargeable are 1.2V, alkalines are 1.5V. Don't assume rechargeable batteries work interchangeably.

I've had rechargeable batteries fail, I've had enough to see them wear out and some were useless out of the package. Really depends on how low discharge these really are (....are they really rebadged Enerloops or knock offs). The reality is if your use case works with these, great - if they don't, you go back to alkalines. Don't get judgey.
Sr. Member
Feb 18, 2010
928 posts
399 upvotes
Greely
Dealbyte wrote: Actually it's NiMH I got a bit confused too at first when it stated
I am also confused. Further down in the technical details, it states Battery cell composition: Alkaline. But agree everything else points to Ni-MH chemistry (HR03)...

I d/l'd the documentation at amazon.com for 85AAAHCB. The PDF indicates Ni-MH, but the amazon.com website also mentions Alkaline...
Deal Addict
Feb 19, 2017
4143 posts
2682 upvotes
Vancouver
sushibucket wrote: I can tell you after working 70 hours a week, I don't even want to do that, I'd rather spend the time on redflagdeals ;D
Multitask Face With Stuck-out Tongue And Tightly-closed Eyes

While browsing on RFD, put the battery in your charger. Then in your way to bed, plug it in a random outlet. Unplug it in the morning when you wake up.

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