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Western Digital 6TB WD Red Plus NAS Hard Drive, CMR, WD60EFZX- $164.99

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May 17, 2011
85 posts
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Montreal, QC

[Amazon.ca] Western Digital 6TB WD Red Plus NAS Hard Drive, CMR, WD60EFZX- $164.99

Hi folks,

I know the 4TB was on sale recently, but if you need the 6TB it's on sale on Amazon, NewEgg and MemoryExpress and direct with WD (no stock though). If buying multiple drives for a NAS, get them from diffrent suppliers to avoid getting drives from the same batch (just in case it was a bad batch)

Happy hunting
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Jun 5, 2010
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Ontario
I need some Red Plus drives for a new NAS I bought a couple months ago. I will give Newegg a try. Last time I bought a drive from Amazon, the bare drive came in one of those bubble wrap bags. Corner was literally dented.
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Nov 1, 2017
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I wanna create a backup for my 16TB FreeNAS server.
2 of these in raid0 would probably be enough to cover the bulk of the data.

What would be the best method? (outside of adding new drives to the existing freenas machine)
Member
Sep 18, 2012
233 posts
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Quebec City
PerformingAzura wrote: I wanna create a backup for my 16TB FreeNAS server.
2 of these in raid0 would probably be enough to cover the bulk of the data.

What would be the best method? (outside of adding new drives to the existing freenas machine)
If you want to backup data, do not use raid0, if you lose a drive = you lose all data.

For 2 disks, use raid1. (you can loose a drive).
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li442il wrote: If you want to backup data, do not use raid0, if you lose a drive = you lose all data.

For 2 disks, use raid1. (you can loose a drive).
But they're trying backup a 16TB NAS using two x 6TB, saying they'd at least get most of the data. Using Raid 0 would only get them 6TB. Yes, I understand they would lose the redundancy.
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li442il wrote: If you want to backup data, do not use raid0, if you lose a drive = you lose all data.

For 2 disks, use raid1. (you can loose a drive).
Skilas wrote: But they're trying backup a 16TB NAS using two x 6TB, saying they'd at least get most of the data. Using Raid 0 would only get them 6TB. Yes, I understand they would lose the redundancy.
+1

The 16TB is a 3x8TB in raid5. I have snapshots enabled so no worries if I mistakenly delete something or get hit by ransom ware.

But I have nothing to protect myself if multiple drives died or something similar.

I supposed I could build another 3x8TB raid 5 but I'm trying to do this for as little money as possible :)

My current freenas server cost me 50$ and doubles as a NVR as well.
[OP]
Newbie
May 17, 2011
85 posts
86 upvotes
Montreal, QC
PerformingAzura wrote: +1

The 16TB is a 3x8TB in raid5. I have snapshots enabled so no worries if I mistakenly delete something or get hit by ransom ware.

But I have nothing to protect myself if multiple drives died or something similar.

I supposed I could build another 3x8TB raid 5 but I'm trying to do this for as little money as possible :)

My current freenas server cost me 50$ and doubles as a NVR as well.
It depends on how robust of a backup plan you want... if money is the concern, for the cost of these 2x 6TB drives, you can buy an external 12-14TB external drive and have your NAS backed up on that... it's not ideal but it's cheap.

Personally, I have my NAS's critical data backing up to my brother's NAS (and vice versa) and also to Onedrive, I also have my less critical data backing up to a 2 drive Synology NAS that I got second hand (with new drives of course).

You have to pick and chose what strategy works for you and strickes a balance between cost and protection...
Member
Oct 19, 2009
248 posts
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Toronto
PerformingAzura wrote: ...
The 16TB is a 3x8TB in raid5. I have snapshots enabled so no worries if I mistakenly delete something or get hit by ransom ware.
...
I would not assume that snapshots protect you from ransomware attacks. Snapshots occupy the same media (at least for some filesystems). I would assume the worst-case and take the view that my snapshots and my files are equally vulnerable. Offline storage is your safest bet if you need to recover from a ransomeware attack.
Sr. Member
Apr 6, 2008
575 posts
555 upvotes
Toronto
PerformingAzura wrote: +1

The 16TB is a 3x8TB in raid5. I have snapshots enabled so no worries if I mistakenly delete something or get hit by ransom ware.

But I have nothing to protect myself if multiple drives died or something similar.

I supposed I could build another 3x8TB raid 5 but I'm trying to do this for as little money as possible :)

My current freenas server cost me 50$ and doubles as a NVR as well.
Raid 0 (striping your data across 2 disks) only gives you faster write speed as you write half-stripes of data to each disk. But for a backup, all you have is time - people aren't usually waiting around for their backups to hurry up and finish. In Raid 0, if you lose 1 disk, you lose 100% of your backed up files, as you only have half-stripes of data on any disk. If it's a backup, I would think JBOD would work fine. If you lose 1 disk, you only lose 50% of your files, rather than 100%.

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