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[Amazon.ca] Zojirushi NP-NVC10 Induction Heating Pressure Rice Cooker 5.5 Cups (Made in Japan) - $458.99

  • Last Updated:
  • May 30th, 2019 11:03 pm
Member
Jan 10, 2017
296 posts
220 upvotes
Had it for a few years. Rice comes out perfectly every time... Also makes perfect quinoa. I usually make 10cups and then then vac pack and freeze the remainder in desired quantities which you can reheat in the microwave oven in minutes.
Member
Nov 20, 2017
431 posts
634 upvotes
Told a Japanese friend about this discussion a bunch of "gaijin" were having about the merits of $100+ rice cookers, she couldn't believe it and just started laughing.

From my time in Japan, most Japanese are somewhat food snobs by default... but beyond the neurofuzzy "I can't measure rice and water ratios to save my life" tech, it's just paying money for status and unnecessary feature creep. Which is cool if you're into that sort of thing.

More important is type and brand of rice you're cooking, where it's from, age, and preparation technique. My friend said Koshihikari rice was considered high-end, noooo idea where to get it but now I'm a man on a kiss-ion!
Member
Jul 29, 2016
217 posts
108 upvotes
Toronto
prodacc wrote: Told a Japanese friend about this discussion a bunch of "gaijin" were having about the merits of $100+ rice cookers, she couldn't believe it and just started laughing.

From my time in Japan, most Japanese are somewhat food snobs by default... but beyond the neurofuzzy "I can't measure rice and water ratios to save my life" tech, it's just paying money for status and unnecessary feature creep. Which is cool if you're into that sort of thing.

More important is type and brand of rice you're cooking, where it's from, age, and preparation technique. My friend said Koshihikari rice was considered high-end, noooo idea where to get it but now I'm a man on a kiss-ion!
Agree with most of the points, and that's exactly why I bought and enjoy this rice cooker because Zojirushi automates the best rice cooking skill learned from human, and with couple hundred dollars, I can enjoy this knowledge.

Also it worth mention about brand of rice, cause I found Zojirushi simply makes a regular brand rice much more tasty.
Deal Addict
Nov 2, 2005
4058 posts
1311 upvotes
WFH
I'm curious, what does induction bring to an appliance like this?
Member
Jul 2, 2014
453 posts
145 upvotes
Maple, ON
I bought one for my parents. I couldn't taste the difference between the rice being cooked in this and a regular one from Canadian Tires. But then again, im not a picky eater either.
Deal Addict
Apr 10, 2017
1036 posts
376 upvotes
Honestly, my rice couldnt get any better with my Instant Pot (have the Ultra model). It costs 1/3 of this.

and I've been eating rice for 33yrs.
Sr. Member
Dec 16, 2010
737 posts
566 upvotes
Canada
My wife is Korean and we've had our Zojirushi for over 7 years. With daily rice meals, this thing is still amazing. Produces awesome tasting rice every time.

Makes cooking rice so simple. Just rinse the starch out, have a little more water over the surface and voila! Amazing tasting rice.

We found a difference with purchasing Korean rice as well.

Cheers!
Deal Addict
Dec 23, 2008
4699 posts
1375 upvotes
Ottawa
Biscayne05 wrote: Honestly, my rice couldnt get any better with my Instant Pot (have the Ultra model). It costs 1/3 of this.

and I've been eating rice for 33yrs.
Since I dumped my rice cooker with instant pot, my 6 years old daughter never eat rice again, instant Pot only good for congee
Deal Addict
Nov 11, 2008
1313 posts
625 upvotes
Vancouver
prodacc wrote: Told a Japanese friend about this discussion a bunch of "gaijin" were having about the merits of $100+ rice cookers, she couldn't believe it and just started laughing.

From my time in Japan, most Japanese are somewhat food snobs by default... but beyond the neurofuzzy "I can't measure rice and water ratios to save my life" tech, it's just paying money for status and unnecessary feature creep. Which is cool if you're into that sort of thing.

More important is type and brand of rice you're cooking, where it's from, age, and preparation technique. My friend said Koshihikari rice was considered high-end, noooo idea where to get it but now I'm a man on a kiss-ion!
sonyHdr12 wrote: Since I dumped my rice cooker with instant pot, my 6 years old daughter never eat rice again, instant Pot only good for congee
Biscayne05 wrote: Honestly, my rice couldnt get any better with my Instant Pot (have the Ultra model). It costs 1/3 of this.

and I've been eating rice for 33yrs.
I found Instant Pot (regular model) to be the worst automatic rice cooker there is. Cooks unevenly as the heating element is just at the bottom. I tried varying the water ratio and total amount of rice but it didn't matter much. Also, the rice easily sticks to the stainless steel pot, which is annoying.

I've tried many other rice cookers too (family, friends), including the original Tatung (double boiler) rice cooker / steamer.

I also bought a $300 Tiger IH rice cooker when I was in Japan when our currency was higher and brought it back. It runs on 100V and was marketed for Japanese market. It's the best rice cooker I've tried...although not the best rice I've eaten as some places I've eaten in Japan had even better outcomes.

Worst rice I've eaten was one time I ran out of rice and was desperate on short notice and bought rice from Save-On-Foods from their "Western Family" generic brand. Worst rice I tasted...it literally tasted like and had the texture of soft plastic. (To the point that I suspect that the rice was fake or tainted in some way)

I typically buy rice here from the better brands, like the Ox Head rice.

So here's what I would say: The rice cooker makes a difference. The rice you use also makes a difference. Not sure to what degree on each but I can definitely tell the difference between rice cookers easily. The rice cookers they sell in North America, by and large, are not good enough. They just don't have the discerning market as a country like Japan would.
Deal Fanatic
Oct 1, 2004
6203 posts
620 upvotes
Toronto
What kind of rice do you guys use from TNT? Japanese? Thai? Mainland China?
Deal Fanatic
Apr 17, 2003
9853 posts
5898 upvotes
dirtmover wrote: I'm curious, what does induction bring to an appliance like this?
Induction makes the heating (and lack of heating) more immediate because you are no longer dealing with the heating element to heat the container. The lack of this latency makes it more accurate to predict what the temperature is that's reaching the rice.
Member
Nov 20, 2017
431 posts
634 upvotes
lil_dreams wrote: Will this be the "one" rice cooker I use for the rest of my life?

I thought $1xx was already fancy.
shamans wrote: So here's what I would say: The rice cooker makes a difference. The rice you use also makes a difference. Not sure to what degree on each but I can definitely tell the difference between rice cookers easily. The rice cookers they sell in North America, by and large, are not good enough. They just don't have the discerning market as a country like Japan would.
That's pretty fair -- for a bit more detailed buying advice, think it's safe to say:

- You will very likely taste a difference between:
A $20-50 budget, off-brand rice cooker or non-rice cooker (e.g. instant pot) that doesn't vent - VS - a brand name (Tiger, Zojirushi, etc.) $70-150 rice cooker, especially if sold in Japan/Korea, but the benefits taper off there.

- You will likely taste a difference between the same type (long-grain, short-grain, etc.) of rice imported from Asia - VS - rice imported from "most" places outside of Asia.

- You *may* be able to tell between brands from Japan - VS - the rest of Asia; it varies from brand to brand, and the mouthfeel best suited to your meal. Get some small 1-2kg bags and figure out what your pallette prefers.

(Some Chinese brands can be good too; I get the health concerns, but even the Japanese government wasn't transparent about fallout from Fukushima. I arrived in 2012, and some rice production was suspected to be produced with irradiated water, even by locals, but the government didn't comment in detail apart from NHK statements saying everything is fine and contained)

Beyond a mid-range, name-brand rice cooker and cooking Asian rice, you can pretty confidently say it's feature creep/status for rice cookers, and preference for rice.

But this thread's rice cooker is shiny name-glitz.
Deal Addict
Nov 11, 2008
1313 posts
625 upvotes
Vancouver
prodacc wrote: That's pretty fair -- for a bit more detailed buying advice, think it's safe to say:

- You will very likely taste a difference between:
A $20-50 budget, off-brand rice cooker or non-rice cooker (e.g. instant pot) that doesn't vent - VS - a brand name (Tiger, Zojirushi, etc.) $70-150 rice cooker, especially if sold in Japan/Korea, but the benefits taper off there.

- You will likely taste a difference between the same type (long-grain, short-grain, etc.) of rice imported from Asia - VS - rice imported from "most" places outside of Asia.

- You *may* be able to tell between brands from Japan - VS - the rest of Asia; it varies from brand to brand, and the mouthfeel best suited to your meal. Get some small 1-2kg bags and figure out what your pallette prefers.

(Some Chinese brands can be good too; I get the health concerns, but even the Japanese government wasn't transparent about fallout from Fukushima. I arrived in 2012, and some rice production was suspected to be produced with irradiated water, even by locals, but the government didn't comment in detail apart from NHK statements saying everything is fine and contained)

Beyond a mid-range, name-brand rice cooker and cooking Asian rice, you can pretty confidently say it's feature creep/status for rice cookers, and preference for rice.

But this thread's rice cooker is shiny name-glitz.
I ordered one so I'll let you know if I see any difference from my mid-range Tiger IH rice cooker from Japan. :)

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