Home & Garden

Anti Scald Mixing Valve

  • Last Updated:
  • Oct 21st, 2020 9:46 pm
Tags:
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 14, 2007
923 posts
336 upvotes

Anti Scald Mixing Valve

I had the water heater rental company bring an inspector in as every year when the temperature dips, I notice occasional drop in hot water temperatures.
Just now I checked it was 110F which is a good temperature, but other times it's lower than that. They demonstrated that the hot water coming from the heater was fine (pipe was hot to touch), but that the pipe that distributes to the rest of the house was much cooler. They said it was a problem with the mixing valve and required a replacement which wasn't covered. So my options are look for a plumber, or try to fix this myself. I've watched a few videos on youtube and this repair doesn't look too bad. In some cases, maybe just washing the inside, getting rid of scaling by soaking in vinegar for a while might even fix the issue. If not though, I would need to buy this valve, and this is such an obscure product there aren't many reviews for me to have an informed opinion. Here's where I'm looking for the community of DIYERs here to please recommend me which valve (brand name/model/features to look for/warranty) to choose. Also please stop me if you think this repair is too risky and I could mess something up real bad to try and save maybe $3-400.

Thanks
39 replies
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
36371 posts
22513 upvotes
Center of Universe
stryder1587 wrote: I had the water heater rental company bring an inspector in as every year when the temperature dips, I notice occasional drop in hot water temperatures.
Just now I checked it was 110F which is a good temperature, but other times it's lower than that. They demonstrated that the hot water coming from the heater was fine (pipe was hot to touch), but that the pipe that distributes to the rest of the house was much cooler. They said it was a problem with the mixing valve and required a replacement which wasn't covered. So my options are look for a plumber, or try to fix this myself. I've watched a few videos on youtube and this repair doesn't look too bad. In some cases, maybe just washing the inside, getting rid of scaling by soaking in vinegar for a while might even fix the issue. If not though, I would need to buy this valve, and this is such an obscure product there aren't many reviews for me to have an informed opinion. Here's where I'm looking for the community of DIYERs here to please recommend me which valve (brand name/model/features to look for/warranty) to choose. Also please stop me if you think this repair is too risky and I could mess something up real bad to try and save maybe $3-400.

Thanks
My advice...bypass the mixing valve altogether.
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
3124 posts
1480 upvotes
Woodbridge
Replacement should not cost of over 250 $ including labour. I am also of the opinion as @vkizzle to bypass it or remove it completely if you do not have too young or too old folks at home.
stryder1587 wrote: I had the water heater rental company bring an inspector in as every year when the temperature dips, I notice occasional drop in hot water temperatures.
Just now I checked it was 110F which is a good temperature, but other times it's lower than that. They demonstrated that the hot water coming from the heater was fine (pipe was hot to touch), but that the pipe that distributes to the rest of the house was much cooler. They said it was a problem with the mixing valve and required a replacement which wasn't covered. So my options are look for a plumber, or try to fix this myself. I've watched a few videos on youtube and this repair doesn't look too bad. In some cases, maybe just washing the inside, getting rid of scaling by soaking in vinegar for a while might even fix the issue. If not though, I would need to buy this valve, and this is such an obscure product there aren't many reviews for me to have an informed opinion. Here's where I'm looking for the community of DIYERs here to please recommend me which valve (brand name/model/features to look for/warranty) to choose. Also please stop me if you think this repair is too risky and I could mess something up real bad to try and save maybe $3-400.

Thanks
Temp. Banned
Jun 4, 2020
1634 posts
1689 upvotes
Clarington, ON
vkizzle wrote: My advice...bypass the mixing valve altogether.
I third the opinion of vkizzle and newlyborn
[OP]
Sr. Member
Sep 14, 2007
923 posts
336 upvotes
I dont have kids or old folks at home. How do I bypass it? I'm guessing there's a T shaped fitting that connects hot/cold/mix but doesn't have an anti scald function? I don't have any tools to cut pipes or anything like that, if this is an easy bypass, please guide me to a tutorial for this.
Deal Addict
Jun 16, 2009
3124 posts
1480 upvotes
Woodbridge
You should know basic plumbing. If its a copper line than brazing and if its pex lines than you should be well versed with crimping. Do you have all the necessary tools?
You will need to cap the cold line feeding into mixing valve and connect hot line coming off from the water heater directly to the line connected to mixing valve. Try youtube for videos.
stryder1587 wrote: I dont have kids or old folks at home. How do I bypass it? I'm guessing there's a T shaped fitting that connects hot/cold/mix but doesn't have an anti scald function? I don't have any tools to cut pipes or anything like that, if this is an easy bypass, please guide me to a tutorial for this.
Deal Fanatic
Dec 5, 2009
5724 posts
3534 upvotes
I removed mine. As long as you don’t have young children it should be fine.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jul 25, 2008
1291 posts
746 upvotes
Richmond Hill
Had the same problem when I moved in. The plumber just told me to remove it. I have young kids but its never been a problem. Teach them not to touch the faucet or how to turn the faucet. They’ll pull back if the water is too hot anyway.
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
3069 posts
1801 upvotes
Mississauga
Yeah..remove it altogether. The potential danger to kids and old are overblown. If kids are old enough where they turn on their own showers, they will know if the water is too hot to their liking. The fear of fire and burn is built into our genes. My 2 year old already knows and reacts to anything hot.
Deal Addict
Feb 10, 2006
2507 posts
478 upvotes
Kitchener
Hopefully you are renting the tank from enercare or another provider other than reliance. Call reliance home comfort and sign up for a plumbing protection plan. They are approximately $20 a month. Wait 7 days and then say you need a plumber. They will replace the mixing valve as it is covered under the plan. Reliance does not have any contracts so after they change the mixing valve call back and cancel the plan.

$20 to have then install a new mixing valve, keeps you to code and saves you time and possibly frustration. Remember to cancel the plan!
Tired of renting from Reliance? This might be useful reliance-home-comfort-2464779/2/#p34473179
Deal Addict
Feb 10, 2006
2507 posts
478 upvotes
Kitchener
IndyBeak wrote: Yeah..remove it altogether. The potential danger to kids and old are overblown. If kids are old enough where they turn on their own showers, they will know if the water is too hot to their liking. The fear of fire and burn is built into our genes. My 2 year old already knows and reacts to anything hot.
Accidents happen. I was at an elderly customers house a few years ago. His friend was paralysed in some way. Apparently the elderly man scalded himself to death. I'm sure they didn't alter the code because they wanted people to blow 400 on nothing.
Tired of renting from Reliance? This might be useful reliance-home-comfort-2464779/2/#p34473179
Member
Jul 14, 2012
329 posts
141 upvotes
Hamilton
Double_J wrote: Hopefully you are renting the tank from enercare or another provider other than reliance. Call reliance home comfort and sign up for a plumbing protection plan. They are approximately $20 a month. Wait 21 days and then say you need a plumber. They will replace the mixing valve as it is covered under the plan. Reliance does not have any contracts so after they change the mixing valve call back and cancel the plan.

$20 to have then install a new mixing valve, keeps you to code and saves you time and possibly frustration. Remember to cancel the plan!
"...I started playing porn REALLY loud with speakers facing my back yard. The kids stopped going out back after the parents heard that." - TheGreatGazoo
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
3069 posts
1801 upvotes
Mississauga
Double_J wrote: Accidents happen. I was at an elderly customers house a few years ago. His friend was paralysed in some way. Apparently the elderly man scalded himself to death. I'm sure they didn't alter the code because they wanted people to blow 400 on nothing.
Yes, accidents happen. But your anecdote, what is the probability of something like that happening. Set the code aside, don't you think it should be the other way around. The approach should be to have a mixing valve by default, and let people add it if they think someone in their home is at risk. Another example, infants can hurt themselves badly if they accidentally roll over the stairs. So do we make it mandatory for all homes to have baby proofing? Or just the parents who have infants in their homes baby proof thing based on their own requirements.
Deal Addict
May 30, 2010
1703 posts
1168 upvotes
vkizzle wrote: My advice...bypass the mixing valve altogether.
1- This now in the code, so doing so... you do you.
2- If you have kids, I strongly advise against it, kids are likely to open the water tap, not realizing it's set to full hot, and burn themselves.
3- If you have guests over, one of them gets burned, and decides to file a claim, your insurance company will investigate, and you are required/obligated to provide that investigator unfettered access, as per the terms of your policy, and as condition for coverage. Evidence of bypassing the valve will absolve your insurance company of liability coverage.

Again, you do you, and think about all repercussions.

A replacement bypass valve can be bought at Lowe's, HD for about $100 on the low end, $150 on the high end. It's fairly easy to replace if the original installer didn't just solder everything in place. If they did, then call a plumber, not a gas fitter to cut and replace with the proper ends, so in the future, you can do it yourself again.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
36371 posts
22513 upvotes
Center of Universe
my0gr81 wrote: 1- This now in the code, so doing so... you do you.
2- If you have kids, I strongly advise against it, kids are likely to open the water tap, not realizing it's set to full hot, and burn themselves.
3- If you have guests over, one of them gets burned, and decides to file a claim, your insurance company will investigate, and you are required/obligated to provide that investigator unfettered access, as per the terms of your policy, and as condition for coverage. Evidence of bypassing the valve will absolve your insurance company of liability coverage.

Again, you do you, and think about all repercussions.

A replacement bypass valve can be bought at Lowe's, HD for about $100 on the low end, $150 on the high end. It's fairly easy to replace if the original installer didn't just solder everything in place. If they did, then call a plumber, not a gas fitter to cut and replace with the proper ends, so in the future, you can do it yourself again.
I have two kids...no ER visits for burns yet.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
36371 posts
22513 upvotes
Center of Universe
my0gr81 wrote: Sample of one.
It wasn't even an issue before it became part of the building code...ask your parents.
Deal Addict
Sep 13, 2016
3069 posts
1801 upvotes
Mississauga
vkizzle wrote: It wasn't even an issue before it became part of the building code...ask your parents.
It would be good if proponents of the valve present some stats of how many baths were taken per year in Ontario and how many of them resulted in injuries or death due to scalding before the valve was made part of the code. Someone "could" get injured is not a good justification in my opinion. Someone could get injured by literally hundreds of things we have in our homes. And then about guests getting injured and suing because water was too hot. I can only say that one needs to take a hard look at their life, if they are inviting kind of guests who cannot turn the tap a little colder, but would rather sue their hosts.
Deal Addict
May 30, 2010
1703 posts
1168 upvotes
US stats, here:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3605550/

This accounts for reported injuries, countless others where no formal treatment was sought, or self treated. Safe to assume the Canadian stats are similar, since water and skin, doesn't really care about the 49th parallel.

Also, for those replying quoting my original comment, as I said, you do you and take the course of action that you think is best for you. Just because you don't believe what the science says (skin burns when subjected to hot water) or don't like the regulations that protect the young/elderly/vulnerable who can't make the mental judgement, or have the speedy reflexes to react to a sudden rush of hot water, doesn't mean the problem doesn't exist.

Treatment for skin burns is covered under health care in Canada. Plastic surgery to cover scars, restore normal looking skin is not. Neither is the lost wages, and drugs (pain, skin meds, etc) during the course of treatment. This is why, any guest that gets burned at another's house, would and should avail themselves of the third party liability provisions of their host's property and casualty insurance if in that situation. That is what insurance is for. Unless of course the host has been negligent, and disabled the fail safes that disqualifies them for coverage.

Top