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Any careers where I can learn on the job?

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  • May 26th, 2019 5:23 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Mar 29, 2012
1444 posts
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Vancouver

Any careers where I can learn on the job?

Hey guys, I quit my full-time warehouse job to try college...as a start to advancing my life past warehousing, I don't think i'll succeed. I'm 26, I think maybe I just don't have the patience to traditionally learn like this. I have so much trouble focusing and being engaged in class, it's more tiring than 16hr shifts I used to do.

I feel like i'm more the type of person to learn on the job rather than listen to lectures 4-6hrs a day. I'm not sure what I should do, are there any good paying careers out there where I can just learn on the job, or doesn't take years of school? I'm talking about something that pays more than $20/hr. I've already tried the trades path when I was younger, i've tried carpentry, tiling, sheet metal, heating & insulation. While the money was good, it was not something I could stand.
22 replies
Deal Addict
Apr 6, 2008
1807 posts
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I would disagree that warehousing is a dead end job...I knew people making 6 figures in a warehouse doing a job that can be taught in a week.

I was going to suggest trades, but sounds like you already tried that. What was the issue? The physical exertion?

You gotta remember that you are competing with everyone else in this world. Many people live on less than $20 an hour, some being a single income household. Life isn't easy. If there is a job that someone's making a middle class income, with very little education, the job is already filled. Life takes sacrifices. You have to start at the bottom, put your time and effort in, and when the time is right you get to move up in the world. No shortcuts short from rich parents or winning the lottery.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Mar 29, 2012
1444 posts
320 upvotes
Vancouver
fusion2k2k wrote: I would disagree that warehousing is a dead end job...I knew people making 6 figures in a warehouse doing a job that can be taught in a week.

I was going to suggest trades, but sounds like you already tried that. What was the issue? The physical exertion?

You gotta remember that you are competing with everyone else in this world. Many people live on less than $20 an hour, some being a single income household. Life isn't easy. If there is a job that someone's making a middle class income, with very little education, the job is already filled. Life takes sacrifices. You have to start at the bottom, put your time and effort in, and when the time is right you get to move up in the world. No shortcuts short from rich parents or winning the lottery.
idk... i've been doing warehousing for 4 years. though i loved it. most companies i've been in don't go pass $16-$20. even supervisors only make like $36k/yr... or something like that. I had a coworker who's friend was the supervisor and that's what he said. i was a logistics auditor and did everything-- loading, receiving, management of workers, etc... i only got paid $16/hr with no raises for the past 4 years, two different companies.

my problem with trades was a mix of the terrible environments, the people are always stressed out, and the work is very stressful, i was getting paid decent money and i felt really underpaid...
Deal Fanatic
Mar 21, 2010
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Toronto
SquirreI wrote: idk... i've been doing warehousing for 4 years. though i loved it. most companies i've been in don't go pass $16-$20. even supervisors only make like $36k/yr... or something like that. I had a coworker who's friend was the supervisor and that's what he said. i was a logistics auditor and did everything-- loading, receiving, management of workers, etc... i only got paid $16/hr with no raises for the past 4 years, two different companies.

my problem with trades was a mix of the terrible environments, the people are always stressed out, and the work is very stressful, i was getting paid decent money and i felt really underpaid...
What college courses did you try? You could try taking one that is more aligned with your experience, something supply chain related maybe - your experience might make it seem less like book learning and more relatable.
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Dec 27, 2009
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Do you have an ADHD diagnosis by any chance? For my daughter, the only way she can actually focus well enough for classes is to go back on her ADHD meds. She doesn't take them for her normal day to day life, but if she has to go on a career course or something like that she needs them. She also has sleep problems which doesn't help.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2011
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Center of Universe
How about sales?
Are you good interacting with people?
Do you like to be on the road for most of the day?
Deal Guru
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Mar 23, 2008
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Have you considered sitting down with a career counselor and figuring out what you want to do with your life? People on the Internet aren't going to know your skills/weaknesses, which makes it hard to really give you any guidance. We can name careers till the cows come home, but it's not going to help.

C
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Apr 6, 2008
1807 posts
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SquirreI wrote: idk... i've been doing warehousing for 4 years. though i loved it. most companies i've been in don't go pass $16-$20. even supervisors only make like $36k/yr... or something like that. I had a coworker who's friend was the supervisor and that's what he said. i was a logistics auditor and did everything-- loading, receiving, management of workers, etc... i only got paid $16/hr with no raises for the past 4 years, two different companies.

my problem with trades was a mix of the terrible environments, the people are always stressed out, and the work is very stressful, i was getting paid decent money and i felt really underpaid...
Then you were working for the wrong companies. I made over 16/hr 15 years ago working in warehouses, and it went up progressively from there. I moved into a skilled trade in the last 7 years but before that I made over 80,000/yr. Not even a supervisor, just a lowly "forklift driver"...
Member
Dec 11, 2013
420 posts
294 upvotes
Toronto
fusion2k2k wrote: Then you were working for the wrong companies. I made over 16/hr 15 years ago working in warehouses, and it went up progressively from there. I moved into a skilled trade in the last 7 years but before that I made over 80,000/yr. Not even a supervisor, just a lowly "forklift driver"...
Things have changed sir.

Companies I've worked with the last 7 years, what he described is how we did it as well.
Deal Addict
Apr 6, 2008
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JFlash20 wrote:
Things have changed sir.

Companies I've worked with the last 7 years, what he described is how we did it as well.
I disagree. There are still many companies around willing to pay well for seemingly "unimportant" jobs. Warehousing and logistics being one of those industries because it's necessary. Manufacturing has taken a hit, yes, but there are several other "spin off" industries that are doing well that offer well paying stable employment. It just takes luck and hard work.
Member
Dec 11, 2013
420 posts
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Toronto
fusion2k2k wrote: I disagree. There are still many companies around willing to pay well for seemingly "unimportant" jobs. Warehousing and logistics being one of those industries because it's necessary. Manufacturing has taken a hit, yes, but there are several other "spin off" industries that are doing well that offer well paying stable employment. It just takes luck and hard work.
Maybe give the OP a point in the right direction then.
Deal Addict
Apr 6, 2008
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JFlash20 wrote: Maybe give the OP a point in the right direction then.
I don't live near Vancouver where the OP is. The housing market out there is nuts so I would assume the job market is the same. However, the issue in my opinion isn't the job market, it's the individual themselves. They need to find something they enjoy, and pour themselves into it and be passionate. It might take awhile, but if things work out they can have a career that pays well and they'll enjoy. Education is only a part of the equation. I have a buddy who started as a part time McDonald's worker in high school...fast forward 15 years, he's now a store manager, company car, the big man in charge. It took awhile, with many years of hard work, but he only has grade 12. It can be done, just takes patience, perseverance, and a bit of good luck.
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Dec 27, 2009
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fusion2k2k wrote: I don't live near Vancouver where the OP is. The housing market out there is nuts so I would assume the job market is the same.
Clearly you don't, and you are dead wrong. Vancouver has always had shit wages. I moved away from the west coast (I was from Victoria - which isn't even as bad as Vancouver) for these reasons.
Member
Dec 11, 2013
420 posts
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Toronto
fusion2k2k wrote: I don't live near Vancouver where the OP is. The housing market out there is nuts so I would assume the job market is the same. However, the issue in my opinion isn't the job market, it's the individual themselves. They need to find something they enjoy, and pour themselves into it and be passionate. It might take awhile, but if things work out they can have a career that pays well and they'll enjoy. Education is only a part of the equation. I have a buddy who started as a part time McDonald's worker in high school...fast forward 15 years, he's now a store manager, company car, the big man in charge. It took awhile, with many years of hard work, but he only has grade 12. It can be done, just takes patience, perseverance, and a bit of good luck.
I mean this with the most possible respect, but you are very out of touch with the current environment.
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Apr 6, 2008
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JFlash20 wrote: I mean this with the most possible respect, but you are very out of touch with the current environment.
Are you suggesting that a kid in high school, hired today, given the right amount of hard work, determination and luck, could not one day become a store manager? Of course it can happen, and it does. The problem is people want to become the store manager in a couple of years, and it doesn't work like that most of the time.
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Mar 24, 2016
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JFlash20 wrote: Things have changed sir.

Companies I've worked with the last 7 years, what he described is how we did it as well.
Well said.
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Dec 27, 2007
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SquirreI wrote: I've already tried the trades path when I was younger, i've tried carpentry, tiling, sheet metal, heating & insulation. While the money was good, it was not something I could stand.
Maybe you just haven't done the right trade? That looks like all home construction, how about commercial or even industrial?

I'm in the trades, making almost 10g a week
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Aug 3, 2006
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SquirreI wrote: I feel like i'm more the type of person to learn on the job rather than listen to lectures 4-6hrs a day.
What's the difference? On the job you're learning through listening, understanding and then doing what's asked. In school you're learning through listening, understanding and then doing what's asked.
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Aug 2, 2010
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SquirreI wrote: Hey guys, I quit my full-time warehouse job to try college...as a start to advancing my life past warehousing, I don't think i'll succeed. I'm 26, I think maybe I just don't have the patience to traditionally learn like this. I have so much trouble focusing and being engaged in class, it's more tiring than 16hr shifts I used to do.

I feel like i'm more the type of person to learn on the job rather than listen to lectures 4-6hrs a day. I'm not sure what I should do, are there any good paying careers out there where I can just learn on the job, or doesn't take years of school? I'm talking about something that pays more than $20/hr. I've already tried the trades path when I was younger, i've tried carpentry, tiling, sheet metal, heating & insulation. While the money was good, it was not something I could stand.
Become a real estate agent, but yes you have to study for the course.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Mar 29, 2012
1444 posts
320 upvotes
Vancouver
fusion2k2k wrote: Then you were working for the wrong companies. I made over 16/hr 15 years ago working in warehouses, and it went up progressively from there. I moved into a skilled trade in the last 7 years but before that I made over 80,000/yr. Not even a supervisor, just a lowly "forklift driver"...
There's definitely no such pay like that in warehousing, at least over here. Even managers don't make $80,000/year. Maybe general manager. Supervisors don't even make that much, most make half that.
Mulder and Scully wrote: What's the difference? On the job you're learning through listening, understanding and then doing what's asked. In school you're learning through listening, understanding and then doing what's asked.


For one, i'm not getting paid, bills are racking up, having trouble finding a part-time job. Even applied to like cleaning jobs for minimum wage, but I think even minimum wage jobs are full this season. And another, i'm not really guaranteed a job after 2-4 years of college, It's totally different. I've worked for maybe 10-12 different companies in different industries since I was 14. Have had a job where I occasionally had to work 20 hours straight with only a 2 hour break in-between to sleep, mandatory 7 days a week, it was nothing to me as long as I got paid. But school is a totally different world. I could do something shorter, like 2 years max, but I think trying for a degree at this age with no job is too much for me mentally. I want a degree eventually though, so I have that possibility of moving to a different country to work, maybe I can look at doing it part-time. I didn't really look at the aspect of being broke and how it would affect me mentally when I decided to go to school.
tmkf_patryk wrote: Maybe you just haven't done the right trade? That looks like all home construction, how about commercial or even industrial?

I'm in the trades, making almost 10g a week
It was actually both industrial, well tilling, I did for i think it's commerical construction? and the rest was for manufacturing, built massive custom built industrial freezers which cost about 100k each. https://www.gea.com/en/products/gea-s-series.jsp (the ones we made were much more massive)

After working for GEA i was just sick of everything related to metal and measurements...the worst part was the people though. Literally everyday people were snapping and on edge. I'm thinking about getting into power engineering though, but I have no idea what the career is like. People i've asked about said they just walk around all day inspecting things, like washrooms, which doesn't really give me much detail. It doesn't sound so bad, as I used to be an auditor for warehousing which was pretty much investigating all day. But i'm pretty sure power engineers do much more than that.

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