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Any tips or tricks to stop mint from spreading?

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  • May 24th, 2019 12:33 pm
[OP]
Sr. Member
Aug 30, 2015
747 posts
473 upvotes
Kitchener, ON

Any tips or tricks to stop mint from spreading?

Hey guys, I moved to this house last September and the lawn was perfect and zero weeds, I imagine it was recently resod? Now that spring is here I noticed a BUNCH of mint (chocolate?) spreading under my fence from the neighbour's backyard. I've tried pulling as many as I could but it's taken over the left portion (I'd say 10-15% of the area). Anything I could do at this point to contain it? This is the first time I live in a house so my gardening skills are nonexistent!

Thanks
22 replies
Temp. Banned
Dec 18, 2009
1710 posts
909 upvotes
Toronto
Either napalm or dig every last bit of it out.

When I was young and foolish, I planted some mint and lemon balm. In 2 years I was swimming in it. Took me many more years to finally get rid of it all. Good luck!
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Nov 10, 2015
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Monte Creek, BC
hoponpop wrote: Either napalm or dig every last bit of it out.

When I was young and foolish, I planted some mint and lemon balm. In 2 years I was swimming in it. Took me many more years to finally get rid of it all. Good luck!
We have lemon balm too, and this year it's going crazy. I sometimes supply a guy who's a chef with it but now it looks like we could supply every restaurant in town.
Same thing with strawberry mint that we planted a couple of years ago.
They are both very nice to use though.

O.P. If it's close to your fence try using Killex or a similar product, if you feel comfortable using it. But use it very sparingly as it's pretty harmful to the birds and the bees.
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Temp. Banned
Dec 18, 2009
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Toronto
poleman wrote:
O.P. If it's close to your fence try using Killex or a similar product, if you feel comfortable using it. But use it very sparingly as it's pretty harmful to the birds and the bees.
Here we go again. Another RFD gardening thread devolving into poisoning the ground. And for what? It'll just come back in a month. Let me guess - stronger poison at that time? Sorry poleman but every "weed" thread turns into a battle of the best poison on this forum. Has nobody heard of weeding?
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Feb 4, 2010
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hoponpop wrote: Either napalm or dig every last bit of it out.

When I was young and foolish, I planted some mint and lemon balm. In 2 years I was swimming in it. Took me many more years to finally get rid of it all. Good luck!
I didn't realize lemon balm was invasive....I think I might have planted that...going to remove it and put into the mint planter
Member
Jan 13, 2007
490 posts
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Toronto, Ontario
From my personal experience, the best way to get rid of mint is to dig it all up. Mint spreads rapidly and once they start, they are really hard to keep under control, so you have to do it right, quickly and efficiently.
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Nov 10, 2015
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Monte Creek, BC
hoponpop wrote: Here we go again. Another RFD gardening thread devolving into poisoning the ground. And for what? It'll just come back in a month. Let me guess - stronger poison at that time? Sorry poleman but every "weed" thread turns into a battle of the best poison on this forum. Has nobody heard of weeding?
It wouldn't turn into a battle if you didn't put your two bits worth in.
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Deal Addict
Dec 15, 2009
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Ontario
hoponpop wrote: Has nobody heard of weeding?
Have you ever tried to remove mint via weeding?

Fact is the stuff is confirmed from his neighbours yard. Weed night and day and mint will still crawl back into his yard.
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Feb 5, 2009
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riffr aff wrote: Have you ever tried to remove mint via weeding?
I have, don't see what is the big deal, I like mint because we use it in food, teas, drinks, just remove it when it spreads and keep it to the contained area.
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Nov 12, 2006
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hoponpop wrote: Here we go again. Another RFD gardening thread devolving into poisoning the ground.
Here we go again. Another RFD gardening thread devolving into an anti-pesticide rant.
Deal Addict
Aug 30, 2011
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Ottawa
Barrier, 12" down and 8" up. A nuisance to do, but it should prevent the mint from spreading into your yard. Weeding is pointless as it will keep coming.
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Dec 15, 2009
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Homerhomer wrote: I have, don't see what is the big deal, I like mint because we use it in food, teas, drinks, just remove it when it spreads and keep it to the contained area.
It never stops growing is the point. OP can't go into neighbours yard so he will be weeding mint until he moves or dies. It is a PITA.
Deal Addict
Mar 22, 2017
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Mint spreads very aggressively - it spreads via seed, spreads underground, and spread if any part of it touches the ground. It's a super-weed.

To kill it, you can tarp it - just put a tarp over the infested area and the heat and lack of light will kill it. Takes a few weeks. Can also use glyphosate to kill it. Can also build a barrier around it - need to build high and deep. To weed by hand, try a thatching rake - it'll grab the root system. It'll come back over and over again, but every time you rake it up it's weaker. With it being in the ground at the neighbour's, you're in trouble unless you erect a barrier though.
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Nov 15, 2008
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Would be concerned that the pesticide travels through roots to the neighbour's mint and they are using it in the kitchen, unaware. Maybe contact the neighbour and agree to a shared approach.
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Mar 22, 2017
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lecale wrote: Would be concerned that the pesticide travels through roots to the neighbour's mint and they are using it in the kitchen, unaware. Maybe contact the neighbour and agree to a shared approach.
Could perhaps use an edging shovel to chop the roots at the property line, then use the glyphosate. Can use the shovel to trench for a plastic barrier as well (need to use a deep one that ends well above ground though).
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Jan 21, 2018
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It's best to try manual removal and re-seeding first, but in the end you may have to get pretty extreme to prevent an invasive plant from spreading. Dig up the entire surface layer, tarp the area to safely kill everything in the soil, then re-seed. And it may come back quickly if it's in the neighbourhood and conditions are right for it to grow.

Weed killers like Killex using 2,4-D are extremely effective against a large class of fast-growing weeds, but I think everyone has an instinct that anything that kills plants so effectively must have some sort of toxic side effect on humans or the environment. However, after many studies over many years, and a lot of dispute, the jury is still out on 2,4-D - no harmful effects proven.
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Aug 30, 2011
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Scote64 wrote: .......Weed killers like Killex using 2,4-D are extremely effective against a large class of fast-growing weeds, but I think everyone has an instinct that anything that kills plants so effectively must have some sort of toxic side effect on humans or the environment. However, after many studies over many years, and a lot of dispute, the jury is still out on 2,4-D - no harmful effects proven.
I think you are mistaking 24D for RoundUp. The science is clear on the toxicity of 24D, it is definitely not harmless.
http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/ex ... d-ext.html
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Mar 22, 2017
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OttawaGardener wrote: I think you are mistaking 24D for RoundUp. The science is clear on the toxicity of 24D, it is definitely not harmless.
http://pmep.cce.cornell.edu/profiles/ex ... d-ext.html
I do find it funny how glyphosate keeps on getting hammered on PR, despite strong overall evidence of its safety, while other chemicals like paraquat, diquat, etc that are actually bad for you fly under the radar. Few people are up in arms about dichloropropene, chlorpyrifos, metam sodium, etc.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
15436 posts
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Eastern Ontario
Mint can certainly be invasive, as it’s roots search out the least bit of dampness in the soil.
And hence it spreads like wildfire.

Most folks who grow mint in their gardens, therefore do so in a container, to CONTAIN It.

Question...
Are you absolutely sure it’s a variety of mint ?

Most are solid green in colour, and ALL will have a minty smell to some extent when you rub the leaves
Be that... Peppermint, Spearmint, Chocolate Mint, Lemon Mint etc

It is my experience as a homeowner these past 40-odd years, that in most cases something spreading under the fences from a neighbours yard isn’t mint, but most likely a groundcover, that they found in a garden centre, and thought it nice looking and ideal for a shady spot... but did NO RESEARCH ON IT.

The most common of the bunch, that I’ve encountered is Bishop’s Weed
(aka Ground Elder, Gout Weed, and Snow on the Mountain)
https://www.bhg.com/gardening/plant-dic ... hops-weed/
You’ll probably know it by its variegated leaves ... this is the most common variety
Although it does come in others solid coloured varieties
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aegopodium_podagraria

Honestly ... it’s a b!tch to eradicate
As it says in the Wikipedia article
If this it what you are facing, I wish you luck
Cuz mint is 100x easier to get rid of !!!

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