Health & Wellness

Anyone have any experience with IV Vitamin Therapy?

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  • Nov 27th, 2022 3:40 pm
[OP]
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Oct 16, 2019
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Anyone have any experience with IV Vitamin Therapy?

I've read about how High-dose Intravenous Vitamin C (HDIVC) exerts a powerful antiviral and anticancer effect.

For example, here is a book about its therapeutic potential against cancer: http://www.drrathresearch.org/attachmen ... r-Rath.pdf

From the book:

"Oral intake of vitamin C, even at a very large dose, can raise plasma vitamin C concentrations to a maximum of only 200 μm/L; whereas an intravenous administration can raise plasma concentrations to as high as 26,000 μm/L. Vitamin C concentrations of this magnitude can selectively kill tumor cells in vitro without any adverse effect on normal human cells. When 0.25-0.5 g/kg vitamin C was injected into rats intravenously or intraperitoneally, it produced an ascorbate concentration of 60-100 times higher in blood and tissue than with the same oral dose."

There is also interesting medical literature regarding antiviral utility:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10 ... 1/full#B15

"There is much evidence that critically ill patients have reduced plasma levels of vitamin C, which is explained by the increased depletion of the vitamin in their body so that one third of ICU patients may have as low vitamin C levels as vitamin C deficient patients (13, 14). In particular, a recent survey found that out of 18 COVID-19 patients, 17 had undetectable vitamin C levels and one patient had a very low level (15). Another recent study also reported low vitamin C plasma levels in COVID-19 patients, and non-survivors had half the plasma level of survivors"

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... Mechanisms

"All of these publications show the anti-viral properties that vitamin C can exert, which should be expected to work as well on SARS-CoV-2 infection, since it has worked with many other types of viruses. Moreover, a case report of a COVID-19 patient with early use of HDIVC showed positive outcomes illustrating the potential benefits of HDIVC in this condition (Gonzalez et al., 2020). The patient presented with chest X-ray opacities and infiltrations, body pain, dry cough and other COVID-19 symptomatology. As she tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, 25 grams of Vitamin C was administered three times daily for three days in a row. The following day after the first infusion, the patient noted a dramatic improvement. Her body pain and headache were gone. Additionally, the most important aspect to highlight is that the infusions did not cause any adverse effects to the infected patient. These promising findings should incite the community to include HDIVC as part of COVID-19 treatment, since it can rapidly improve and stabilize the patient without causing side effects."
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Deal Addict
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Oct 14, 2009
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Windsor, Ont.
The people that have the best experiences with high dose vitamin C are the people selling it to you.
[OP]
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Oct 16, 2019
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ugly wrote: The people that have the best experiences with high dose vitamin C are the people selling it to you.
Lazy, cynical, and logically-fallacious dismissal.
Deal Addict
Aug 17, 2008
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You can't believe everything you read on the internet. Lots of bad or misleading "research" to promote alternative medicine.

Always check what trusted sources say.

There is real research on potential of high dose vitamin C to "compliment" cancer treatments. But it's still preliminary, and it doesn't cure cancer (it just "might" boost the effectiveness of chemo and radiation, or reduce side effects of cancer treatment). As far as just getting vitamins by IV just for general health, most real experts (with no vested interests) will tell you that you are wasting your money.

Here's what Mayo Clinic says about High Dose Vitamin C to treat cancer:
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-con ... q-20057968
Subsequent well-designed, randomized, controlled trials of vitamin C in pill form found no such benefits for people with cancer. Despite the lack of evidence, some alternative medicine practitioners continue to recommend high doses of vitamin C for cancer treatment.

....vitamin C given through a vein (intravenously) has been found to have different effects than vitamin C taken in pill form. This has prompted renewed interest in the use of vitamin C as a cancer treatment.There's still no evidence that vitamin C alone can cure cancer, but researchers are studying whether it might boost the effectiveness of other cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy and radiation therapy, or reduce treatment side effects.
There are still no large, controlled clinical trials that have shown a substantial effect of vitamin C on cancer, but some preliminary studies do suggest there may be a benefit to combining standard treatments with high-dose IV vitamin C. Until clinical trials are completed, it's premature to determine what role vitamin C may play in the treatment of cancer.


And here is an article on Dr. Joe Mercola, one of the worst peddlers of bogus alternative medicine options. Specifically talks about claims that Vitamin C helps against COVID.
https://www.mcgill.ca/oss/article/covid ... own-doctor

Dr. Joe Mercola, an osteopathic physician who has made an impressive fortune selling supplements through his online store, has a new book out about the COVID-19 pandemic, a book which he co-authored with Ronnie Cummins, an organic food crusader. This book, as well as Mercola’s decades of peddling health misinformation on the Internet, exemplifies the dangerous blind spot of the wellness movement. Health gurus are not in the business of public health; they rise to fame by framing health as a personal choice and by selling immune boosters that have earned, they wrongfully claim, a scientific seal of approval.

-Dr. Joe Mercola is an osteopathic physician who sells supplements and wellness products and his net worth is $100 million
-He uses low-quality scientific studies to justify the many supplements he sells while denouncing high-quality studies that disagree with him because their funders are allegedly corrupt
[OP]
Newbie
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Oct 16, 2019
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I think the problem is that there's little monetary incentive to substantiate (with well-designed clinical trials) the utility of generic molecules that can't be patented & monopolized in treating illness. I wouldn't let a few anecdotal red herrings detract you away from the therapeutic potential of something as innocuous as vitamins and other nutrients.
Deal Addict
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Oct 14, 2009
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Cryptoleaf wrote: I think the problem is that there's little monetary incentive to substantiate (with well-designed clinical trials) the utility of generic molecules that can't be patented & monopolized in treating illness. I wouldn't let a few anecdotal red herrings detract you away from the therapeutic potential of something as innocuous as vitamins and other nutrients.
The greatest lie that supplement pushing grifters have ever told.
multimut wrote: -Dr. Joe Mercola is an osteopathic physician who sells supplements and wellness products and his net worth is $100 million
Seems like there's plenty monetary incentive.
Deal Addict
Apr 5, 2007
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Cryptoleaf wrote: I've read about how High-dose Intravenous Vitamin C (HDIVC) exerts a powerful antiviral and anticancer effect.

For example, here is a book about its therapeutic potential against cancer: http://www.drrathresearch.org/attachmen ... r-Rath.pdf

From the book:

"Oral intake of vitamin C, even at a very large dose, can raise plasma vitamin C concentrations to a maximum of only 200 μm/L; whereas an intravenous administration can raise plasma concentrations to as high as 26,000 μm/L. Vitamin C concentrations of this magnitude can selectively kill tumor cells in vitro without any adverse effect on normal human cells. When 0.25-0.5 g/kg vitamin C was injected into rats intravenously or intraperitoneally, it produced an ascorbate concentration of 60-100 times higher in blood and tissue than with the same oral dose."

There is also interesting medical literature regarding antiviral utility:

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10 ... 1/full#B15

"There is much evidence that critically ill patients have reduced plasma levels of vitamin C, which is explained by the increased depletion of the vitamin in their body so that one third of ICU patients may have as low vitamin C levels as vitamin C deficient patients (13, 14). In particular, a recent survey found that out of 18 COVID-19 patients, 17 had undetectable vitamin C levels and one patient had a very low level (15). Another recent study also reported low vitamin C plasma levels in COVID-19 patients, and non-survivors had half the plasma level of survivors"

https://www.researchgate.net/publicatio ... Mechanisms

"All of these publications show the anti-viral properties that vitamin C can exert, which should be expected to work as well on SARS-CoV-2 infection, since it has worked with many other types of viruses. Moreover, a case report of a COVID-19 patient with early use of HDIVC showed positive outcomes illustrating the potential benefits of HDIVC in this condition (Gonzalez et al., 2020). The patient presented with chest X-ray opacities and infiltrations, body pain, dry cough and other COVID-19 symptomatology. As she tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, 25 grams of Vitamin C was administered three times daily for three days in a row. The following day after the first infusion, the patient noted a dramatic improvement. Her body pain and headache were gone. Additionally, the most important aspect to highlight is that the infusions did not cause any adverse effects to the infected patient. These promising findings should incite the community to include HDIVC as part of COVID-19 treatment, since it can rapidly improve and stabilize the patient without causing side effects."
If nothing else, you should read who the AUTHORS are of the book you cited:
Dr. Rath has a reputation shall I say? https://www.theguardian.com/world/2008/ ... rath.aids2

Are you going to find research that shows A maybe a good candidate for Disease B? Yes, the question is, how good of a quality are those research papers?
https://www.covid19treatmentguidelines. ... vitamin-c/
https://www.medpagetoday.com/special-re ... res/100246
Deal Expert
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Oct 5, 2008
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https://www.cedars-sinai.org/blog/iv-vi ... erapy.html

In recent years, IV vitamin treatments have soared in popularity.

Celebrities and social media influencers say the treatments are the latest wellness must-have.

It sounds simple enough: Just 45 minutes to get an IV treatment packed with vitamins and minerals. The infusions can be done in the comfort of your own home, in a clinic setting, or even at music festivals.

The treatments are advertised with a host of reported benefits. In addition to the most widely cited benefit of curing hangovers, IV vitamin treatments can supposedly help fight exhaustion and boost the immune system.

However, there is little scientific evidence to back these claims.


Do IV treatments work?
For patients with certain gastrointestinal conditions, IV vitamin treatments can help provide necessary nutrition that their stomachs can't absorb.

But most people can get the nutrients they need from food or a multivitamin.

"The most important thing they're getting is water with salt, which you could get from a sports drink," says Dr. Torbati.

"These treatments are mostly harmless and really just result in people making expensive urine."
Deal Addict
Dec 29, 2012
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If I was critically ill, maybe with Covid-19, and nothing else is working, I'd be willing to get IV Vitamin C - but of course OHIP won't pay for this, and finding a sound integrative doctor to provide IV therapy is difficult and extremely costly.

We can't reject any treatments as not working just because there hasn't been extensive research done. New discoveries are made every day, e.g. cardio disease was once attributed to eating too much fat and high cholesterol, and now doctors are saying to go keto and to cut out carbs.
Deal Addict
Apr 5, 2007
1805 posts
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Canada
Catnippy wrote: If I was critically ill, maybe with Covid-19, and nothing else is working, I'd be willing to get IV Vitamin C - but of course OHIP won't pay for this, and finding a sound integrative doctor to provide IV therapy is difficult and extremely costly.

We can't reject any treatments as not working just because there hasn't been extensive research done. New discoveries are made every day, e.g. cardio disease was once attributed to eating too much fat and high cholesterol, and now doctors are saying to go keto and to cut out carbs.
There is a difference between trying something because "I am dying and desperate" vs. because I want to do it for its "powerful antiviral and anticancer effect".
The former falls into what you said. The latter falls into potentially pseudoscience.
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2004
1301 posts
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Looking thru pubmed not some ppl posting on their website with monetary gain

Literature review in 2020 showed no additional benefits
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32404636/

However there are some articles that show promiseing data but mostly case report on ADVANCED stage Ca. However more clinical studies are warranted the authors concluded.

So for run of the mill healthy GI individual don’t think HDIVC is warranted at the moment.

Some studies did show some deleterious effect with HDIVC.
Deal Addict
Jul 21, 2004
1301 posts
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Cryptoleaf wrote: I think the problem is that there's little monetary incentive to substantiate (with well-designed clinical trials) the utility of generic molecules that can't be patented & monopolized in treating illness. I wouldn't let a few anecdotal red herrings detract you away from the therapeutic potential of something as innocuous as vitamins and other nutrients.
Vitamins are not innocuous. Ingestion of high amount of vitamin A and D are toxic.

Vitamin and supplement is a ~$35 billion dollar industry annually in the US. But it is prettt much useless on those who are eating a normal well balance diet. All these excess vitamin B complex and C are excreted in urine.

Anyways. There are tons of peer reviewed high quality articles on how useless vitamin supplement on “healthy individual on a well balanced diet”. Not those who are restrictive due to malabsorptions, dietary restriction etc

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