Cell Phones

Anyone here using Groundwire SIP app on iOS? Does Callkit work?

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  • Aug 4th, 2017 10:34 pm
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[OP]
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Feb 21, 2004
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Anyone here using Groundwire SIP app on iOS? Does Callkit work?

Anyone here on iOS using the Groundwire SIP App? Before I splurge 13$ on it, looking for feedback specifically on this platform.

I want to know if CallKit works well aka, do incoming calls work well with regards to push notifications (without the app being open or even in the background) and do they show them on the native iPhone call screen?
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Apr 20, 2017
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Most of the people are using SIP trunking. It has given good results; it is efficient and works much faster.
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HoTiCE_ wrote:
Jul 18th, 2017 10:21 pm
Anyone here on iOS using the Groundwire SIP App?
Yes, I do.

I want to know if CallKit works well aka, do incoming calls work well with regards to push notifications (without the app being open or even in the background) and do they show them on the native iPhone call screen?
Yes

However, there's a drawback with push notifications in that your SIP credentials are essentially being given to Acrobits, in order for them to register your SIP username and password on their proxy server so that you can receive push notifications from them. While Acrobits is reputable, giving another service your SIP username and password is a potential security issue.

Groundwire supports handoffs during calls between cellular data and Wi-Fi without call drops.
Last edited by Webslinger on Jul 31st, 2017 8:51 am, edited 1 time in total.
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[OP]
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Webslinger wrote:
Jul 31st, 2017 8:51 am
However, there's a drawback with push notifications in that your SIP credentials are essentially being given to Acrobits, in order for them to register your SIP username and password on their proxy server so that you can receive push notifications from them. While Acrobits is reputable, giving another service your SIP username and password is a potential security issue.

Groundwire supports handoffs between cellular data and Wi-Fi without call drops.
That's the old method of doing push notifications for SIP applications on smartphones

The new CallKit in theory wouldn't require that this 3rd party keeps your SIP credentials hence me looking at GroundWire. It seems like the only SIP application leveraging CallKit at this point on the iOS platform
Last edited by HoTiCE_ on Aug 1st, 2017 9:28 am, edited 1 time in total.
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HoTiCE_ wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 9:28 am
The new SmartKit in theory wouldn't require that this 3rd party keeps your SIP credentials
You may be confusing Callkit with Pushkit.


Regardless, if Acrobits changed something, they haven't updated their FAQ since 2011.

From https://www.acrobits.net/hesk/knowledge ... article=52

"Once you enable Push Notifications in Acrobits Softphone or Groundwire, we register your SIP account on SIPIS (our server that handles Push Notifications) whenever you exit the app (whether you move it to the background or close it). To your SIP provider or PBX, it looks just like any other registration, making you available for calls. Once SIPIS recieves an invite (incoming call), we send the relevant information to Apple, who sends you a Push Notification. Once you accept the Push Notification, Acrobits Softphone or Groundwire will open and SIPIS will connect the call to your device. At this point SIP Traffic will continue to be routed through SIPIS, while audio will go directly to the device.

Before we continue, I should note that this is just a simplified explanation of how Push Notifications work solely intended to give the average user a basic understanding of the process. If you have specific technical questions not answered here, feel free to open a ticket. "

It might be best to submit a ticket and ask: https://www.acrobits.net/hesk/
Last edited by Webslinger on Aug 1st, 2017 9:44 am, edited 1 time in total.
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HoTiCE_ wrote:
Aug 1st, 2017 9:28 am
It seems like the only SIP application leveraging CallKit at this point on the iOS platform
Bria supports CallKit

Has anyone tried CallKit with Bria?
[OP]
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You guys were right. They still require our SIP credentials despite CallKit, I did confuse both. Deal breaker for me!
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HoTiCE_ wrote:
Aug 2nd, 2017 11:22 am
You guys were right. They still require our SIP credentials despite CallKit, I did confuse both. Deal breaker for me!
Specifically, you're looking for Pushkit support without needing to transmit SIP credentials to the App developer.
I'm not entirely certain how that would work.

Consider that in order for incoming calls to occur at all, SIP registration needs to exist somewhere. SIP registration is not required for outgoing calls--but
it is required for incoming calls. And in order to receive a push notification, the push server needs to know there's an incoming call. If the app isn't
running, and if, consequently, the original SIP connection is closed, then the question is how do you maintain SIP registration so that the push server can
be notified of an incoming call? Acrobits uses SIPIS servers to maintain SIP registration when the app is closed.

The advantage to using push is, of course, to save on battery life.

Groundwire does support CallKit. But as soon as you enable push, you're sending your SIP username and password, securely over HTTPS, to their SIPIS servers for SIP
registration. When an incoming call comes in, a notification is sent to the push server.


Image

Not all of this diagram applies, but you can get the gist.

When dealing with a SIP service that limits registration requests (for example, Freephonline will temporarily issue an IP ban if more than 5 registration attempts are made within a 5 minute period), the user needs to be aware that the entire idea behind using a proxy for push notifications requires Acrobits to be able to unregister/register freely since they need to switch back and forth between the device used and the SIPIS proxy server. Also keep in mind that these SIPIS servers are in the U.S.

There may be a slight delay between the time the incoming call comes in and the time your phone receives a push notification.

So, yeah, it's not a perfect solution, but it does eliminate the need for your iPhone to be maintaining SIP registration.
Last edited by Webslinger on Aug 2nd, 2017 2:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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If you enable push with Bria, your info is similarly sent to Bria.
https://www.callcentric.com/support/device/bria/mobile
"If using the PUSH feature in Bria then your username and password will be transmitted to CounterPath systems."

I'm not sure I see away around this if the app being used isn't running. If the app isn't doing SIP registration, something needs to do it.

About a month ago, Push notifications in Bria for iOS was a beta feature: https://support.counterpath.com/topic/bria-mobile-beta.
It may still be.
Last edited by Webslinger on Aug 2nd, 2017 5:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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[OP]
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What iOS needs in fact is a native SIP client the way Android does on their phone systems.

I work in IT Security and I will never give away my credentials like that to a 3rd party. You would think these are big companies with the budget for security but don't be fooled, they cannot be trusted with it for the most part.

Either that or my VOIP provider (VOIP.ms) needs a native system
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HoTiCE_ wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 10:36 am
my VOIP provider (VOIP.ms) needs a native system
Yeah, unless the SIP service (ITSP) provider is willing to send push notifications to Apple or Google, I'm not sure how else to address the problem of having SIP credentials being used elsewhere.
SIP registration is required for incoming calls. Consequently, SIP registration is a prerequisite for push notifications. If the SIP app has all connections closed and never wakes at all (in order to save battery),
it cannot maintain SIP registration.
I work in IT Security and I will never give away my credentials like that to a 3rd party.
Sure, I can appreciate that concern, which is why I raised it in my initial reply to you.
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HoTiCE_ wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 10:36 am
What iOS needs in fact is a native SIP client the way Android does on their phone systems.

I work in IT Security and I will never give away my credentials like that to a 3rd party. You would think these are big companies with the budget for security but don't be fooled, they cannot be trusted with it for the most part.

Either that or my VOIP provider (VOIP.ms) needs a native system

"Push" is just one way to solve the battery life issue.

SIP signalling via TCP is another method if supported by your VoIP provider. TCP is now supported by VoIP.ms

Acrobits developed "push" back when VoIP providers didn't support mobile devices at all.

Nokia was the first to support VoIP natively in S60 OS. I'm told Android OS native SIP support is pretty junky compared to most apps
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l69norm wrote:
Aug 3rd, 2017 12:01 pm
SIP signalling via TCP is another method if supported by your VoIP provider. TCP is now supported by VoIP.ms
That's really the only alternative at this time to push, and unfortunately, using the TCP/backgrounding method still drains the battery more than Push. But yes, it's an option that doesn't require SIP credentials to be sent elsewhere.

https://doc.acrobits.net/cloudsoftphone/faq.html

Acrobits refers to this method as "backgrounding":
Backgrounding
The application will sleep in the background and will only awake for significant events (e.g. incoming calls, reregistering, network changes etc.) This option requires the provider to use TCP as a transport protocol and the registration period must be 600 seconds or longer. This option is not as battery efficient as Push Notifications but much better than Keep Device Awake. But if you support TCP (or TLS), this may still be your preferred option since it does not rely on SIPIS for incoming call notifications.

Backgrounding is supported by Groundwire:
Visit https://www.acrobits.net/hesk/knowledge ... article=60 for more information.
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For VoIP.ms on TCP, I'm using a registration timer of 3600 (60 mins) and a keep alive of 900 (15 mins). The impact on battery life is less than 10% overnight

The disadvantage is that if VoIP.ms has a server failure and redirects load to a different server, I won't detect this for up to 15 mins

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