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Anyone need Plumbing help or advice

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Deal Guru
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Sep 21, 2010
13769 posts
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Montréal
Either I didn't have an upstairs neighbor ever since I moved in or the pipes have gotten noisier. I can hear whenever they use the water in the above bathroom area (I guess it's when they flush the toilet since it's about 30 seconds in duration). The noise really 'sounds off' through my toilet even though I obviously didn't use mine at the time. The condo's only a few years old. Is this any concern? Do you guys hear your neighbors' water running?
The richest 1% of this country owns half our country’s wealth, 5 trillion dollars, one-third of that comes from hard work, two-thirds comes from inheritance, interest on interest accumulating to widows and idiot sons, and what I do.. <find the rest>
Jr. Member
Aug 19, 2007
187 posts
96 upvotes
Toronto
Hello, I have a ground floor, concrete on slab that I've run radiant heat for. (supplemental as I have a furnace as well). I've received a number of quotes/opinions on how to approach the domestic hot water and radiant flooring.

1) Boiler for the floor Hot water tank for HW
2) Boiler for the floor, tankless for HW
3) Navi/other combi boiler - tankless domestic HW and feeds the floor (I'm afraid this won't be enough for a 5 person, 5 bathroom house
4) Heat Exchanger working with the HW Tank to feed the floor and provide HW. 75 Gallon tank. This is the most cost effective solution I've found to date at about $4500

would love to get some thoughts/professional opinions. Also need someone to take the job in the next week or two if you have any recommendations.

Thanks!
Deal Addict
Oct 22, 2002
1886 posts
334 upvotes
A question on A/C condensate line + flow-through humidifer plumbing:

Currently my A/C condensate + flow-through humidifier drains are tee'd together with clear vinyl tubing. They drain to an open floor drain in what will soon become a basement bathroom.

I'm re-arranging things (removing the floor drain) and would like to drain the A/C + humidifier instead into a sink drain. Would the following setup be acceptable (using a dishwasher connection wye before the trap)?

Condensate.jpg

I've looked through section 7 of the building code but can't find any special requirements for condensate or humidifier drains . The drain outlets of the A/C and humidifier are much higher than the rim of the sink will be.
Sr. Member
Feb 28, 2016
978 posts
635 upvotes
I'm looking for a bit of help with the design I have in mind for my bathroom reno in a single story home with a crawlspace. I attached a sketch of what I'm looking to build as far as drainage lines go (please excuse the sloppy writing). All piping is going to be ABS as that's what's pre-existing and readily available. In the attached picture, both my washer drain and bathroom sink will be draining into the 3" stack, I believe I got this all figured out. Now where the 3" stack transitions from a wet vent to the drainage line (part with the circled "3"), I believe I have to go with a Wye vs. a Sanitary T here. Behind that I plan to go with a cleanout at the end of the run. Downstream from where the wet vent dumps in, I will have the water closet draining into the pipe also. I believe this (part with the circled "2") will have to also be a Wye vs. a Sanitary T. Can somebody confirm this? Thanks,

Image
[OP]
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Oct 15, 2007
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paintballdude05 wrote: I'd say as long as you're before the trap, you'll be okay.
abstract808 wrote: A question on A/C condensate line + flow-through humidifer plumbing:

Currently my A/C condensate + flow-through humidifier drains are tee'd together with clear vinyl tubing. They drain to an open floor drain in what will soon become a basement bathroom.

I'm re-arranging things (removing the floor drain) and would like to drain the A/C + humidifier instead into a sink drain. Would the following setup be acceptable (using a dishwasher connection wye before the trap)?


Condensate.jpg


I've looked through section 7 of the building code but can't find any special requirements for condensate or humidifier drains . The drain outlets of the A/C and humidifier are much higher than the rim of the sink will be.

you may be OK, but its not proper or code compliant.

a condensate drainage line must not be directly connected to a plumbing system. it must be indirectly connected with an air gap

section 7.4.2.1 (1)(d)(vi)(vii)
Last edited by Red_Army on Jan 18th, 2017 8:09 pm, edited 3 times in total.
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[OP]
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Oct 15, 2007
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responded to your PM. it all would qualify as a wet/stack vent
also you must use a wye fitting. a tee-wye/sanitary tee may only be used in its vertical position, unless its being used for dry venting

paintballdude05 wrote: I'm looking for a bit of help with the design I have in mind for my bathroom reno in a single story home with a crawlspace. I attached a sketch of what I'm looking to build as far as drainage lines go (please excuse the sloppy writing). All piping is going to be ABS as that's what's pre-existing and readily available. In the attached picture, both my washer drain and bathroom sink will be draining into the 3" stack, I believe I got this all figured out. Now where the 3" stack transitions from a wet vent to the drainage line (part with the circled "3"), I believe I have to go with a Wye vs. a Sanitary T here. Behind that I plan to go with a cleanout at the end of the run. Downstream from where the wet vent dumps in, I will have the water closet draining into the pipe also. I believe this (part with the circled "2") will have to also be a Wye vs. a Sanitary T. Can somebody confirm this? Thanks,

Image
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
Deal Addict
Oct 22, 2002
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Red_Army wrote: you may be OK, but its not proper or code compliant.

a condensate drainage line must not be directly connected to a plumbing system. it must be indirectly connected with an air gap

section 7.4.2.1 (1)(d)(vi)(vii)
Thanks for finding it in the code....I understand the reasoning for an air gap, but I don't think there's any chance of a backup or siphoning of waste into the humidifier or A/C drain line. I could always tee off with an open-ended tube to add an air gap if it was ever necessary.

I suppose I could also put the drain tube into the sink, but that's pretty unsightly.
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Dec 19, 2009
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abstract808 wrote: Thanks for finding it in the code....I understand the reasoning for an air gap, but I don't think there's any chance of a backup or siphoning of waste into the humidifier or A/C drain line. I could always tee off with an open-ended tube to add an air gap if it was ever necessary.

I suppose I could also put the drain tube into the sink, but that's pretty unsightly.
Why do you think they make codes?
It's to protect stupid people from doing stupid things!
There is a chance of a backup so they made a code to protect you.
It's also meant to keep the little bacterial creatures from getting from the sewer line and climbing up into your humidifier and start growing and get airborne from your furnace and get up yur nose.
[OP]
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Oct 15, 2007
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Also, I meant air Break, Not air gap. There's a difference
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Deal Addict
Oct 22, 2002
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Ok, I think I understand indirect connections:

7.3.3.11. Indirect Connections
(1) Where a fixture or device is indirectly connected, the connections shall be made by terminating the fixture drain above
the flood level rim of a directly connected fixture to form an air break.
(2) The size of the air break shall be at least 25 mm.

Unfortunately my furnace room wasn't built with a floor drain, and it wasn't possible to add one (it's surrounded by load-bearing walls with deep footings). So I'm trying to figure out the best way to drain things. The current drain tubing snakes it way through a wall into a floor drain in another room, which I'm renovating into a bathroom.

If I use a condensate pump, with its drain connected as my picture above, would that be ok?
[OP]
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Oct 15, 2007
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abstract808 wrote: Ok, I think I understand indirect connections:

7.3.3.11. Indirect Connections
(1) Where a fixture or device is indirectly connected, the connections shall be made by terminating the fixture drain above
the flood level rim of a directly connected fixture to form an air break.
(2) The size of the air break shall be at least 25 mm.

Unfortunately my furnace room wasn't built with a floor drain, and it wasn't possible to add one (it's surrounded by load-bearing walls with deep footings). So I'm trying to figure out the best way to drain things. The current drain tubing snakes it way through a wall into a floor drain in another room, which I'm renovating into a bathroom.

If I use a condensate pump, with its drain connected as my picture above, would that be ok?
NO. its the exact same thing. you still require an air break
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
Deal Addict
Sep 26, 2007
1165 posts
236 upvotes
Gatineau
Hello
I'm having an issue connecting my thermostatic valve shower fixture. It came with a male-male 3/4 to 1/2 NPS (straight) threads on both sides. Therefore, I have a hard time connecting the 1/2 straight thread to the existing withing which are NPT (tapered). Teflon tape does not cut it. It ends up leaking.
Should I try pipe dope (Megaloc? Great White?), or it's bound to fail? It baffles me why this is the stuff that came with my fixture. I was totally unable to find any adapter that transitions from straight to tapered...
See attached picture. Where it ends up leaking is from the chrome (straight) fitting into the female 1/2 (tapered) coupler. It screws in for many turns, but can't get a seal.
Image
[OP]
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Oct 15, 2007
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Try using the pink teflon tape made by masters. That white stuff is garbage
Everything has been said before, but since nobody listens we have to keep going back and beginning all over again. - Andre Gide
Deal Addict
Dec 19, 2009
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Why do you need the brass nipple and coupling when you can just screw it into the drop ear elbow?

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