• Last Updated:
  • Sep 13th, 2020 5:18 pm
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 7, 2007
153 posts
32 upvotes
ontario

Baby Formula

Hi Everyone,

We welcomed out newborn last week. I had a question about formula. I seen some posts on this forum talking about the costco kirkland brand being a good choice.

The pediatrician only wants us to breast feed but at the moment we don't have enough so we are supplementing with formula. The hospital gave us enfamil that was premixed (no added water necessary). At home my wife had bought similac advance powder. I already purchased a second container (964g) at Walmart for about 40 bucks.

I was wondering what are the preferred formula brands for the best price. Do you think we should be using powder formula? The pediatrician gave us no direction with this and only wanted breast milk. We will see him next Friday again.

Thanks for any replies.
14 replies
Member
Aug 16, 2014
266 posts
236 upvotes
Oshawa, ON
Hey! We started out on the premix just like you, my wife breastfed whenever she could, but it wasn’t enough. We ended up giving our baby the premix as it’s completely sterile, whenever she needed the extra milk that my wife couldn’t give.

They say to use the premix for the first couple months as that’s when your babys immune system needs as little bacteria as possible.

The powder is obviously more at risk to contain bacteria because you open and close the lid several times a day.

If you already bought powder formula, I would only suggest to put it aside for a couple months and use it later as it’s expiry will be way down the line.

Try to give them the premix if you’re able to afford the extra money. It’ll be one less thing for you to worry about.

Edit: we use the Costco powder and the similar advance pre mix
Jr. Member
Aug 3, 2010
192 posts
362 upvotes
North York
Our baby girl was born 4 weeks ago and we're in the same boat. Not enough milk produced and baby not latching so we are pumping and supplementing with premixed formula (Similac Advance 59 mL). We're only using premixed formula at the moment as our midwife + online articles have stated that it is the only safe alternative for young babies. Problem is, they are very expensive, so far I've purchased 10 x 24 packs when they were on sale a week ago (~$23) and this whole feeding thing has been a huge source of anxiety for us, working with a few lactation consultants to hopefully get her breastfeeding exclusively.

Good luck!
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 7, 2007
153 posts
32 upvotes
ontario
Hi thanks for your reply can you please tell us what premix you're referring to our baby only uses about 60 ml
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 7, 2007
153 posts
32 upvotes
ontario
As a follow-up to the last post. the baby puts her hands and her socks in her mouth is it a really big deal that if we use powdered formula? We are definitely sterilizing bottles as required though.
Deal Addict
Feb 20, 2014
1225 posts
433 upvotes
Toronto
Powdered formula is perfectly fine to use if your baby isn’t premature. Just boil tap water and use that to mix with the formula.

I used powdered formula and I’ve known many parents who have as well. It’s also cheaper!

Keep in mind though that once opened, powdered formula is only good for 30 days.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Nov 13, 2010
6764 posts
1249 upvotes
Scarborough
Keep pumping the more you pump the more increase will be the supply
Hospitals have deals with supplies so they use all their equipment from bottles, formula, etc etc. They use enfamil.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 7, 2007
153 posts
32 upvotes
ontario
Thanks for all replies.

What do you all think of the kirkland powder formula for backup? Mom has certainly been producing more breast milk the last few days.
Deal Expert
Aug 2, 2001
16577 posts
6703 upvotes
We went with the Enfamil Ready to Feed "Nursettes" at the beginning when they were eating only a little (they are only 59ml bottles). This is what our hospital gave us as well while we were there. We then moved onto the Kirkland formula you reference. We would boil the water once a day, store it in clean bottles, then make each bottle "fresh". We did not sterilize the bottles (other than when we first got them), we simply washed them.

One tip - get a couple funnels (and clean them) for putting formula into the bottles. Otherwise you're trying to get the formula from the scoop into the bottle and with the pressure of a screaming baby or fatigue being 3am you might spill formula on more than one occasion. Obviously get a bottle brush for cleaning.

Another tip - the nurse leading our pre-natal classes told us that her best tip for new parents is to move towards their last feeding of the night being a bottle since it will hold the baby longer and you'll get more sleep. Even if you breast feed, she said she recommends throwing in a bottle in the mix for that feeding.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 9, 2011
9016 posts
10446 upvotes
Vancouver
tribute4 wrote: The pediatrician only wants us to breast feed but at the moment we don't have enough
How do you know you don't have enough? Was that diagnosed by a doctor? My wife is a public health nurse for newborns and she constantly encounters moms who believe they aren't producing enough milk, but rarely is there a problem. There's plenty of milk, it's just new mom lack of confidence in her own body's ability. Unless you have a low milk supply diagnosis from a doctor, I wouldn't go with formula, especially not since your pediatrician recommends against formula.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 7, 2007
153 posts
32 upvotes
ontario
TrevorK wrote: We went with the Enfamil Ready to Feed "Nursettes" at the beginning when they were eating only a little (they are only 59ml bottles). This is what our hospital gave us as well while we were there. We then moved onto the Kirkland formula you reference. We would boil the water once a day, store it in clean bottles, then make each bottle "fresh". We did not sterilize the bottles (other than when we first got them), we simply washed them.

One tip - get a couple funnels (and clean them) for putting formula into the bottles. Otherwise you're trying to get the formula from the scoop into the bottle and with the pressure of a screaming baby or fatigue being 3am you might spill formula on more than one occasion. Obviously get a bottle brush for cleaning.

Another tip - the nurse leading our pre-natal classes told us that her best tip for new parents is to move towards their last feeding of the night being a bottle since it will hold the baby longer and you'll get more sleep. Even if you breast feed, she said she recommends throwing in a bottle in the mix for that feeding.
Haha great post. Yesterday at 3am I poured a full scoop of formula over the nipple instead of the bottle opening.screaming baby and all.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 7, 2007
153 posts
32 upvotes
ontario
Kiraly wrote: How do you know you don't have enough? Was that diagnosed by a doctor? My wife is a public health nurse for newborns and she constantly encounters moms who believe they aren't producing enough milk, but rarely is there a problem. There's plenty of milk, it's just new mom lack of confidence in her own body's ability. Unless you have a low milk supply diagnosis from a doctor, I wouldn't go with formula, especially not since your pediatrician recommends against formula.
Thanks for your post. We find that after she pumps, she gets about 15ml per breast. (Up from 5 about a week ago). Total 30ml isn't enough for the baby it seems so that's why we got the formula. It's like the breast is dry no more comes out even if she squeezes and pumps more. My wife has been producing more the last few days so it looks like things are progressing in a good direction. Hopefully in a week or so we will be at the 80 to 100 mark. Currently about 30% of the feeds are Breast Milk, the rest was formula.

Edit: the doctor didn't diagnose low milk supply or anything. He encouraged us to keep trying to BF. Unfortunately the baby isn't latching which is why my wife's pumping.
Deal Fanatic
User avatar
Jan 9, 2011
9016 posts
10446 upvotes
Vancouver
Pumping always draws out less milk than a baby can. So when you see small amounts after pumping, it is easy to conclude low supply, but that is not the case. Keep on it! The more you breast feed, the more gets produced, and the more supply you have. Don’t give up, it’ll come! Get help from a public health nurse on the latching. Follow your paediatrician’s advice and skip the formula. Every time you use formula instead of breast feeding, you are reducing breast milk supply.
Deal Addict
Jan 2, 2015
1775 posts
1114 upvotes
NOT centre of Univer…
tribute4 wrote: Thanks for your post. We find that after she pumps, she gets about 15ml per breast. (Up from 5 about a week ago). Total 30ml isn't enough for the baby it seems so that's why we got the formula. It's like the breast is dry no more comes out even if she squeezes and pumps more. My wife has been producing more the last few days so it looks like things are progressing in a good direction. Hopefully in a week or so we will be at the 80 to 100 mark. Currently about 30% of the feeds are Breast Milk, the rest was formula.

Edit: the doctor didn't diagnose low milk supply or anything. He encouraged us to keep trying to BF. Unfortunately the baby isn't latching which is why my wife's pumping.
Feeding newborns is always such a stressful time for new Panrents. I remember the difficulties and frustration. We had a very tiny Abby that they were concerned with growth, so monitored a lot. Some tips
- what one pumps is not The amount the baby is getting. Generally, babies are more effective in getting milk than a pump. The true way to measure the amount of how much the baby is getting after a feed is to change the diaper just before feeding, weight the baby, fee, and then weight again immediately after feed. The difference is the intake. This is what a lot of lactation consultants do. You must have a very accurate digital scale.
- pump immediately after each feed, there shouldn’t be a lot left but it will increase the milk production. It is a lot of work for the mom, so dad will need to take the baby right after. This was one of the more stressful parts for me, I seriously felt like a diary cow. So if one can’t keep it up, don’t stress

Formula tips
- unless the doctors says to use the premixed, one does not need it. Powder is fine.
- Our trick was to boil water ahead of time (do not use distilled). Put it the water in two sterile thermos. One thermos should contain the hot boiled water, the other one boiled water that has been cooled first.
- when mixing the formals put the water in from the two bottles (start with the hotter water and add the cooler water to get the right temp). Add the measured formula and mix.
- do small amounts and you can keep making an ounce at a time as needed so it doesn’t get wasted.


If you boil the water, and sterile everything ahead of time, it perfectly safe for the baby. I used this technique usually at night or when I was by myself to save time.
On a 'smart' device that isn't always so smart. So please forgive the autocorrects and typos. If it bothers you, then don't read my posts, but don't waste my time correcting me. If you can get past the typos, then my posts generally have some value.
[OP]
Jr. Member
Apr 7, 2007
153 posts
32 upvotes
ontario
Thanks a lot for your reply. After reading this thread she has been working on the latch.

Top