• Last Updated:
  • Sep 1st, 2021 12:05 pm
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2010
2547 posts
2495 upvotes
Ottawa

Backseat Baby Mirror

We are expecting our second at the end of September. When baby arrives, we will have two rear facing kids in the back seat of our RAV4 for at least a couple of years.

Does anyone have suggestions for a mirror, or combination of mirrors, that can sit on the middle headrest and still see both rear facing car seats?

I know we technically can install one on the head rest for each passenger seat, but that's generally not recommended because of the risk of the mirror falling off and striking the kid in an accident, so we're trying to stick with placing a mirror on the centre seat headrest.
Last edited by Dynatos on Aug 29th, 2021 8:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
9 replies
Deal Addict
Mar 24, 2015
1311 posts
611 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
I don't have a recommendation but following as I'm looking for a solution too for our twins. Can't sit in the middle as it's too tight and need to be able to keep an eye on them.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 2, 2012
4392 posts
2562 upvotes
Toronto
Dynatos wrote:
I know we technically can install one on the head rest for each passenger seat, but that's generally not recommended because of the risk of the mirror falling off and striking the kid in an accident, so we're trying to stick with placing a mirror on the centre seat headrest.
Is this really a thing? For both our kids we had the mirror on the passenger back seat so directly in front of them. They are so lightweight and strapped on with a huge harness to the seat headrest, I can't see there being any actual risk of it ever injuring them. We have our 3rd kid arriving soon and will use the same one for them.
https://carseatblog.com/38603/mythbuste ... rs-deadly/
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2010
2547 posts
2495 upvotes
Ottawa
rob444 wrote: Is this really a thing? For both our kids we had the mirror on the passenger back seat so directly in front of them. They are so lightweight and strapped on with a huge harness to the seat headrest, I can't see there being any actual risk of it ever injuring them. We have our 3rd kid arriving soon and will use the same one for them.
https://carseatblog.com/38603/mythbuste ... rs-deadly/
That link concludes that the risk is plausible. That's enough for me to try to mitigate the risk entirely.
Deal Addict
User avatar
Jan 2, 2012
4392 posts
2562 upvotes
Toronto
Dynatos wrote: That link concludes that the risk is plausible. That's enough for me to try to mitigate the risk entirely.
The risk was plausible assuming you buy the heaviest mirror that doesn't secure well.
"After extensive research, I haven’t been able to find mention of any injuries from backseat mirrors and certainly no fatalities from them. In terms of physical injuries caused by mirrors, I think we are left to assume that it is possible for a child to be injured by a poorly attached heavy mirror that becomes dislodged in a crash."

If you buy a super lightweight mirror with soft edges, and with a secure harness on it, the risk to me is negligible and not worth worrying about.

If you look at any baby product you have in your car or home today, take the worst designed brand for each one and you'll find some element of plausible risk and reports of accidents happening. That doesn't mean the general product itself is unsafe, it just means you have to ensure you buy a good well made version. i.e. there are many cases of cheap poorly designed cribs collapsing or causing injury, making a crib in general a "plausible risk" to use one. Yet I'm sure you use one in your home as that doesn't mean all cribs are unsafe. The convenience/usefulness of it far outweighs the potential for harm.

You need to do what you feel comfortable with, but to me some things like this that have essentially zero reported injuries are not worth stressing over and people are being way overly cautious.
Member
May 21, 2012
321 posts
261 upvotes
Burlington
There are two possible issues with backseat mirrors. The first is that they can become a projectile in a crash, but so can everything else in the vehicle. People have been injured by purses/tools/etc. in collisions. Cell phones, travel mugs, diaper bag, etc. all pose a risk. It is up to the individual to decide how much risk they are willing to accept. (Although humans are terrible at properly assessing risk.) The risk is lower with a lightweight mirror than a heavy one with lights/batteries. The risk also varies with how well the mirror is attached to the seat.

The second risk is that the mirror can be a distraction for the driver. It takes time to glance in the mirror and that is time that the driver is not looking at the road ahead. Some people will want to check the mirror often, which increases the risk. On the other hand, for some anxious people, a glance in the mirror can lower their anxiety and allow them to concentrate on driving better. And of course, there are going to be special cases of specific medical concerns, etc. where the advantages of the mirror outweigh any potential risks.

It is parental discretion as to whether they want to use a mirror after understanding the risks and benefits.
Deal Expert
Feb 7, 2017
22774 posts
21610 upvotes
Eastern Ontario
Sometimes …

IMO … all this new stuff ain’t worth the bother

Were no backseat mirrors when we had our kids

And they all sat in backwards facing buckets the first year or so.

TRUTH … 99% of the time you buckled those car seats in … and kid was asleep before we got to the end of our street / road

Babies & cars are like that

Now front facing and older kids … ya we glanced in the standard rear view mirror often to see what those active little toddlers were up to
Deal Addict
User avatar
Oct 2, 2018
2074 posts
2275 upvotes
Toronto
Get a light weight (plastic) mirror with very good harness to attach, you'll be fine.

We didn't have mirrors when our kids were young however have no issue putting on in if doing it all over again, or for when i get grandkids.

Good to get some advice, but nothing glaring tells me not to move forward if you wish.
Youth is the gift of nature, age is a work of art.
[OP]
Deal Addict
Oct 24, 2010
2547 posts
2495 upvotes
Ottawa
muskrat191 wrote: There are two possible issues with backseat mirrors. The first is that they can become a projectile in a crash, but so can everything else in the vehicle. People have been injured by purses/tools/etc. in collisions. Cell phones, travel mugs, diaper bag, etc. all pose a risk. It is up to the individual to decide how much risk they are willing to accept. (Although humans are terrible at properly assessing risk.) The risk is lower with a lightweight mirror than a heavy one with lights/batteries. The risk also varies with how well the mirror is attached to the seat.

The second risk is that the mirror can be a distraction for the driver. It takes time to glance in the mirror and that is time that the driver is not looking at the road ahead. Some people will want to check the mirror often, which increases the risk. On the other hand, for some anxious people, a glance in the mirror can lower their anxiety and allow them to concentrate on driving better. And of course, there are going to be special cases of specific medical concerns, etc. where the advantages of the mirror outweigh any potential risks.

It is parental discretion as to whether they want to use a mirror after understanding the risks and benefits.
In our view, it prevents the driver from craning their neck to check on a crying baby while driving. To me, the risk of having the distraction (i.e. the mirror) is less than the risk of becoming distracted because I don't have it.

We've found that, with our toddler still rear facing, it reduces tantrums as well. He has a fit if he can't see us, and the mirror lets him see the driver through the rear-view.

The advice on the lack of risk by attaching securely to the headrest is a good one. We've decided to buy a second mirror and attach both to the headrests.
Deal Addict
Mar 24, 2015
1311 posts
611 upvotes
Ottawa, ON
Dynatos wrote:
We've found that, with our toddler still rear facing, it reduces tantrums as well. He has a fit if he can't see us, and the mirror lets him see the driver through the rear-view.

The advice on the lack of risk by attaching securely to the headrest is a good one. We've decided to buy a second mirror and attach both to the headrests.
We will do the same, get two mirrors. My twins are spitting up a lot these days. They have reflux and cry every time there is a big spit up, so mirrors would definitely help to know why they are crying and if there are any discomfort. I can't sit in between them as it's too tight so I have to sit in front with my husband and I remember telling him so many times, I wish I could see lol. We made a 2hr drive last week and they both cried for at least 1hr. We made a stop to check on them but if we can avoid making stops it would be better. I think once they are a bit older we won't need the mirrors anymore.

Top