Computers & Electronics

Backup solution for videos, photos

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[OP]
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Dec 6, 2012
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Regina

Backup solution for videos, photos

I run a small business transferring video tapes, photos and other vintage media to modern media. I keep my customers files for 30 days after the work is completed just incase they want extra copies or I need to redo something.

Currently in my editing rig I have one hard drive for capturing files, one hard drive as the monthly backup.

I am looking for an affordable backup solution. I was thinking of using two external hard drives that would be identical incase one died. Or a raid 1 setup in an enclosure.

I would also like to backup my computers as well as my personal videos and photos.

Any suggestions?
Looking to buy Epson HT2150ST
28 replies
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Jan 21, 2018
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In our business we use a RAID array for our working database. We run a backup program called SecondCopy that copies every new or changed file to secondary storage about once an hour, and keeps several generations of files that are changing. Once a day that entire "changes" dataset gets dumped to tertiary backup, and overnight we also run an incremental backup snapshot of the entire system. When those storage disks fill up, we retire them to archival storage permanently, so we can pull up anything from 6 months ago, a year ago, 7 years ago etc.. Disks are relatively cheap, and only keep getting bigger.
Deal Expert
Jan 27, 2006
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The question of "how bulletproof do you want the back-up to be" always comes up in these types of discussions.

For example - do you want to be protected from a drive failure or data corruption issue? Or how about a computer or facility issue (ie floods, fire...)?

As Scote64 stated, drives are cheap these days... I will add that broadband is fairly cheap as well. So, I would have an immediate backup somewhere physically close by (ie on a RAID) but I would also have a second copy within a reasonable distance but physically separate from the working system (ie an ethernet connected standalone RAID box placed high up on the other side of your office or on another floor of your house if you are working from home). The physical distance will protect you from physical damage like floods and a certain extent fires. If you value the work enough, you can get off-site storage (using that broadband access) either via a back-up service OR a DIY type thing with a VPN and computer located at another physical location.

There is also a lot of value in off-line backups as well where a periodic full copy is taken with incremental 'deltas' on a regular basis. The off-line backups help in case of some kind of randomware attack where the data has been corrupted but you might not notice right away but those affected files are backed up overwriting your originals.
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get a couple of google account and do what linus does

[self promotion rule violation, removed twice already][self promotion rule violation, removed twice already]Trolling or Threadcrapping Trolling - woooooooo 3k on a laptop woooooooo 3k on a laptop woooooooo 3k on a laptop woooooooo 3k on a laptop
[OP]
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Dec 6, 2012
1637 posts
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Regina
Thanks everyone so far for your suggestions.
Looking to buy Epson HT2150ST
[OP]
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Dec 6, 2012
1637 posts
833 upvotes
Regina
Any suggestions on a raid system? Was thinking of building a pc for this with freenas.

A little overkill but I found an Amd 3200g for $100 locally and motherboards around $70.
Looking to buy Epson HT2150ST
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Jan 27, 2006
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Depends on what you want it to look like. Personally, if I was working on large video files for a living, I would like to have a RAID 0+1 (for speed) in my workstation and then a second RAID 5 (or something similar) set-up somewhere else but if you are going to only keep those files for a temporary period of time (ie your original 30 day limit), you don't really need a lot of drives as the drives themselves are BIG these days.

Personally, I would look for something physically small for the second unit then I can place it anywhere and if it's just for a NAS, then you really don't need much processing power either. I would actually get one of those small form factor PCs that DELL or HP sells that are off-lease and plug in a freenas supported disk controller card and plug in your drives. If you want something that uses ECC memory, then you would need to find a good used server chassis - anything made in the last 8 years should have enough power.
[OP]
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Dec 6, 2012
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Thinking about it I think a 2 bay nas will be sufficient for now.
Looking to buy Epson HT2150ST
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Jan 27, 2006
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waloshin wrote: Thinking about it I think a 2 bay nas will be sufficient for now.
If its just a 2 bay unit, then definitely get one of those small form-factor workstations that holds two drive bays - they'll have enough power, small, well built, and come pre-built. You might not even need to load FreeNAS and just get a RAID card if the motherboard doesn't support RAID natively. The nice thing about those SFF workstations is that they are almost dead-silent.
[OP]
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craftsman wrote: If its just a 2 bay unit, then definitely get one of those small form-factor workstations that holds two drive bays - they'll have enough power, small, well built, and come pre-built. You might not even need to load FreeNAS and just get a RAID card if the motherboard doesn't support RAID natively. The nice thing about those SFF workstations is that they are almost dead-silent.
Was thinking HPE Proliant MicroServer Gen10 and adding a raid card vs TS-231P2 or a TS-431P2.
Looking to buy Epson HT2150ST
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Jan 27, 2006
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waloshin wrote: Was thinking HPE Proliant MicroServer Gen10 and adding a raid card vs TS-231P2 or a TS-431P2.
You can go there but realistically, you seem like you are just looking for a file-sharing device (ie something to present a share to the network) without anything being too fancy - please correct me if I'm wrong. If that's the case, you could just take a step back and get one of those refurb'd SFF from refurb.io or Bauer Systems for under $200 (heck you can get two of them and have a spare in case you need the parts), plug in a RAID card and basically be done with it. Most of those SFF come with a Windows license which you can still update to Windows 10 so the cost is low.

The nice thing about running a Windows-based OS is that you can run other software on that box to support what you are doing - ie automated backup/copy/sync software - rather than running it on your main workstation. Sure, it's not hot-swappable and the drives may not rebuild without user intervention but you have to factor in how many times you are going to be doing that. And BTW> regardless of what route you take, I would have an extra drive or two of the same make/model as spares since in a few years, if a drive fails, chances are that drive won't be available for a replacement and most RAID set-ups work better with identical drives.
[OP]
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Dec 6, 2012
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Regina
You are right my desktop has enough power that I have no reason to run vms all I need is a file server to keep things backed up nothing too fancy.
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Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
28914 posts
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If it were me I'd set up a pair of FreeNAS (or Ubuntu with ZFS) locally and maybe sneakernet a backup home with me.
craftsman wrote: I will add that broadband is fairly cheap as well.
But OP needs upload speed which usually means not cheap, especially when it's a business account too.
I highly doubt OP has fiber so using someone like Cable which in the case of Shaw means 300/20. 20mbps is only good for about 200GB per day which isn't much when we're talking about video. And that's pinning the connection for a solid 24 hours.
That's not to say it's not a good idea, but it's just not really feasible because ISPs are jerks.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
Jr. Member
Apr 18, 2012
157 posts
49 upvotes
Saint-Jean-Sur-Riche…
Hi, I am very interested by this thread, as I am a enthusiast photographer and have more than 130K photos (most in RAW format, each reaching now an average of 45 MB for each 36 mbpx FF sensor body).
Like others said, I am already grateful for the very interesting suggestions or points of view provided so far, this is very constructive!

I am slowly progressing in my steps of reorganizing my backup workflow, But I'd say I am on a budget, so looking for the best options in that regards.
I'd like to share someting a work colleague told me about :
an interesting product called http://unraid.net and the paid license is not too expensive.

In a nut shell, it allows to boot a linux OS from an USB key (), and where you can use any type of connection for your storage. You can apparently connect any HD you already have (sata, usb, whatever... it just depends what the HW it's running from can support...). I have like 2 x 5TB, + 1 4TB, and maybe 4 or 5 1TB usb external drives , plus 3 x 1-2 TB sata...
It could Stripe a raid over your current storage, ans you can upgrade the connected devices when it dies, or when you have some spare money (or waiting for good deals on RFD :) )....
Just plug it on your LAN to get a low-cost NAS...
At some point, it reduce the ecological print by giving a second life to your existing HW if you are like me and hardly throw away things...
I am not decided yet for my final solution, but I thought this info would be of some interest in here...

Please let me know what are your thoughts about that product...
best regards
Syl
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Jan 10, 2017
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cotesyl wrote: Hi, I am very interested by this thread, as I am a enthusiast photographer and have more than 130K photos (most in RAW format, each reaching now an average of 45 MB for each 36 mbpx FF sensor body).
Like others said, I am already grateful for the very interesting suggestions or points of view provided so far, this is very constructive!

I am slowly progressing in my steps of reorganizing my backup workflow, But I'd say I am on a budget, so looking for the best options in that regards.
I'd like to share someting a work colleague told me about :
an interesting product called http://unraid.net and the paid license is not too expensive.
Do you have Amazon Prime?
They offer unlimited Photo backup (includes all types of RAW that I know of), no conversion. This would be the best solution for you if you are looking for backup.

If you are expecting to keep a quick 30 day pull in case a customer needs/changes their mind like OP needs, a NAS that is local on your network would be the solution.
Using old PC hardware with Gigabit Ethernet, you would only need to purchase matching hard drives for unraid, which would only protect you from one failing hard drive out of the bunch.
This would offer speed and protection in case of hardware failure.
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
28914 posts
14447 upvotes
cotesyl wrote: I'd like to share someting a work colleague told me about :
an interesting product called http://unraid.net and the paid license is not too expensive.
I mean... thousands of people use it, but I'm personally not a fan.
While most people certainly don't need more than 24 drives, their literature saying that you can have "unlimited" drives is patently false.
It's technically true except you can't use more than 24 or 28 (I can't remember) actual data drives.
Plus it lacks active error correction.
Just plug it on your LAN to get a low-cost NAS...
I'm cheap and would rather save the $60-120 and use something like FreeNAS.
Same concept: Install onto a USB key and then set up storage.
It's not nearly as flexible in terms of random drive sizes, but I MUCH prefer ZFS over pretty much every other file system.
ZFS is truly unlimited. That is unless you want to boil the world's oceans....
At some point, it reduce the ecological print by giving a second life to your existing HW if you are like me and hardly throw away things...
Me in a nutshell. I'm running hundreds of terabytes on LGA1366 era hardware.
But it's not the base hardware that's the issue. It's the drives. $200x24xa bunch of nodes gets expensive. $500 or even $1000 for the NAS itself is peanuts in comparison.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
Jr. Member
Apr 18, 2012
157 posts
49 upvotes
Saint-Jean-Sur-Riche…
MadCanadian wrote: Do you have Amazon Prime?
They offer unlimited Photo backup (includes all types of RAW that I know of), no conversion. This would be the best solution for you if you are looking for backup.

If you are expecting to keep a quick 30 day pull in case a customer needs/changes their mind like OP needs, a NAS that is local on your network would be the solution.
Using old PC hardware with Gigabit Ethernet, you would only need to purchase matching hard drives for unraid, which would only protect you from one failing hard drive out of the bunch.
This would offer speed and protection in case of hardware failure.
Thanks for your answer, Yes I have prime, but I am never sure I want to keep it, so on the long term, it's not an option for now.
And like others said, I am not convinced with the upload performance/cost because I have intermediate not-unlimited packages with my ISP I'd have to change that.
I am more looking at making a local copy of local master data files on a solution like NAS, and performing offsite backups, on other HDDs, or could be on a cloud service as well... trying to automate the process, because good will never suffice.
:-)
Jr. Member
Apr 18, 2012
157 posts
49 upvotes
Saint-Jean-Sur-Riche…
death_hawk wrote: I mean... thousands of people use it, but I'm personally not a fan.
While most people certainly don't need more than 24 drives, their literature saying that you can have "unlimited" drives is patently false.
It's technically true except you can't use more than 24 or 28 (I can't remember) actual data drives.
Plus it lacks active error correction.


I'm cheap and would rather save the $60-120 and use something like FreeNAS.
Same concept: Install onto a USB key and then set up storage.
It's not nearly as flexible in terms of random drive sizes, but I MUCH prefer ZFS over pretty much every other file system.
ZFS is truly unlimited. That is unless you want to boil the world's oceans....


Me in a nutshell. I'm running hundreds of terabytes on LGA1366 era hardware.
But it's not the base hardware that's the issue. It's the drives. $200x24xa bunch of nodes gets expensive. $500 or even $1000 for the NAS itself is peanuts in comparison.
Thanks for the suggestion, I'll have a look!
LGA1366... I think I remember this, was it SCSI ? I remember drivers were somewhat tricky at that time... :rolleyes:
Deal Expert
Aug 22, 2006
28914 posts
14447 upvotes
cotesyl wrote: Thanks for the suggestion, I'll have a look!
LGA1366... I think I remember this, was it SCSI ? I remember drivers were somewhat tricky at that time... :rolleyes:
If it did it was probably the tail end of SCSI but even then I think that quit with LGA771.
The only tricky thing for me was booting the stupid flash tool so I could reflash my SAS2008 firmwares otherwise I've had no troubles with them.
Do you not have anything else to do rather than argue with strangers on the internet
Nope. That's why I'm on the internet arguing with strangers. If I had anything better to do I'd probably be doing it.
Sr. Member
Jan 18, 2017
768 posts
350 upvotes
death_hawk wrote: I'm cheap and would rather save the $60-120 and use something like FreeNAS.
Same concept: Install onto a USB key and then set up storage.
It's not nearly as flexible in terms of random drive sizes, but I MUCH prefer ZFS over pretty much every other file system.
ZFS is truly unlimited. That is unless you want to boil the world's oceans....


Me in a nutshell. I'm running hundreds of terabytes on LGA1366 era hardware.
But it's not the base hardware that's the issue. It's the drives. $200x24xa bunch of nodes gets expensive. $500 or even $1000 for the NAS itself is peanuts in comparison.
Curious to hear your input. I'm deciding between a cheapo 2-bay Synology/QNAP or throwing together a system for FreeNAS/unRaid. I currently only have a 4TB drive, and planning to add another 4TB for Raid1. The FreeNAS/unRaid build would be more money upfront, but the advantage is expandability - correct? When I fill up the 4TB; I can simply add more drives to expand storage; whereas the 4TB drives would be a "sunk cost" in the 2-bay NAS. Can I simply add, say a pair of 10TB drives down the road? Then 20TB drives when those fill, etc? Thanks,

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